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When I use an imperative language I often write code like

foo (x) {
    if (x < 0) return True;
    y = getForX(x);
    if (y < 0) return True;

    return x < y;
}

That is, I check conditions off one by one, breaking out of the block as soon as possible.

I like this because it keeps the code "flat" and obeys the principle of "end weight". I consider it to be more readable.

But in Haskell I would have written that as

foo x = do
    if x < 0
        then return x
        else do
            y <- getForX x

            if y < 0
                then return True
                else return $ x < y

Which I don't like as much. I could use a monad that allows breaking out, but since I'm already using a monad I'd have to lift everything, which adds words I'd like to avoid if I can.

I suppose there's not really a perfect solution to this but does anyone have any advice?

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Out of curiosity, why the do-block and returns at all? To me it would seem the conversion of this code would be non-monadic. –  stusmith Aug 10 '11 at 9:54
    
@stutsmith Oh, well just cause of getForX is monadic, i guess. –  Owen Aug 10 '11 at 9:56
    
OK, well I've added my non-monadic solution as an answer anyway, just for reference. –  stusmith Aug 10 '11 at 10:01
    
On the third line in your haskell version I think you want then return True. –  HaskellElephant Aug 10 '11 at 10:30
    
@HaskellElephant you're right, Thank you. –  Owen Aug 10 '11 at 10:54
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4 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

For your specific question: How about dangling do notation and the usage of logic?

foo x = do
  if x < 0 then return x else do
  y <- getForX x
  return $ y < 0 || x < y

Edit

Combined with what hammar said, you can even get more beautiful code:

foo x | x < 0     = return x
      | otherwise = do y <- getForX x
                       return $ y < 0 || x < y
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2  
These are all good answers but the "dangling do" I think will help me the most. –  Owen Aug 10 '11 at 10:27
    
Because, while beautiful, the second code fragment doesn't answer the Owen's question: how to flatten several nested ifs. Also, wow, I would have guessed that to be a syntactic error. @Owen, I suppose it's a matter of preference, but I think the first fragment hides the structure of the computation: you can't immediately tell how the condition affects the rest of the code. If you can't use a short-circuiting monad (I usually write a monad instance for Either which stops on the first Left), the large if is probably a better idea. –  scvalex Aug 10 '11 at 12:07
    
@scvalex It's an exception in GHC's parser. IIRC, it will only work with do and possibly proc. –  FUZxxl Aug 10 '11 at 15:35
1  
@FUZxxl: In section 2.7 of the Haskell report, the layout rules are defined such that the non-brace lexeme immediately following a where, let, do or of determines the indentation level. So this not GHC-specific, but part of the standard, even Haskell 98. –  hammar Aug 10 '11 at 21:19
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Using patterns and guards can help a lot:

foo x | x < 0 = return x
foo x = do
    y <- getForX x
    if y < 0
        then return True
        else return $ x < y

You can also introduce small helper functions in a where clause. That tends to help readability as well.

foo x | x < 0 = return x
foo x = do
    y <- getForX x
    return $ bar y
  where
    bar y | y < 0     = True
          | otherwise = x < y

(Or if the code really is as simple as this example, use logic as FUZxxl suggested).

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The best way to do this is using guards, but then you need to have the y value first in order to use it in the guard. That needs to be gotten from getForX wich might be tucked away into some monad that you cannot get the value out from except through getForX (for example the IO monad) and then you have to lift the pure function that uses guards into that monad. One way of doing this is by using liftM.

foo x = liftM go (getForX x)
  where
    go y | x < 0     = True
         | y < 0     = True
         | otherwise = x < y
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Isn't it just

foo x = x < y || y < 0 where y = getForX x

EDIT: As Owen pointed out - getForX is monadic so my code above would not work. The below version probably should:

foo x = do
  y <- getForX x
  return (x < y || y < 0)
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2  
Well it would be except that getForX is monadic. –  Owen Aug 10 '11 at 10:22
    
The logic's a little different though, since getForX is always "called" regardless of the value of x. –  Owen Aug 11 '11 at 0:36
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