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Below is my code, basically if the answer is "Y" then the script runs a message if it's something else then it closes.

#! usr/bin/perl
print "Do you wish to run Program? [Y/N]:";
$answer = <>;
if($answer == "Y") {
 print "COOOL\n";
} else {
 system "exit"
}
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5  
What the heck is system "exit", and what do you expect it to do? –  tchrist Aug 10 '11 at 13:30
    
dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/3775141/… –  Joel Berger Aug 10 '11 at 16:46
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7 Answers 7

Perl will tell you exactly what the problem is, if you ask it. Just add "use warnings" to your code.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;

print "Do you wish to run Program? [Y/N]:";
$answer = <>;
if($answer == "Y") {
 print "COOOL\n";
} else {
 system "exit"
}

Then running it, gives:

$ ./y
Do you wish to run Program? [Y/N]:Y
Argument "Y" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at ./y line 6, <> line 1.
Argument "Y\n" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at ./y line 6, <> line 1.
COOOL

It's even better if you add "use diagnostics" as well.

$ ./y
Do you wish to run Program? [Y/N]:Y
Argument "Y" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at ./y line 7, <> line 1 (#1)
    (W numeric) The indicated string was fed as an argument to an operator
    that expected a numeric value instead.  If you're fortunate the message
    will identify which operator was so unfortunate.

Argument "Y\n" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at ./y line 7, <> line 1 (#1)
COOOL

Programming in Perl is far easier if you let Perl help you find your errors.

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2  
why not suggest use strict as well. Doesn't help in this case but it certainly will at some point. –  Joel Berger Aug 10 '11 at 17:01
1  
I agree. It certainly will. But I didn't want to overcomplicate things. Small steps :) –  Dave Cross Aug 11 '11 at 8:35
    
I would have added use strict as a note at the bottom of the answer to the effect of: You should also use strict; as well, which will help you find more errors. –  Brad Gilbert Dec 16 '11 at 18:22
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Remove newline. == is for numerical equality, for string you need eq.

chomp($answer);
if($answer eq "Y") {
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I tried the chomp but now this happens. hey@ubuntu:~/Desktop$ perl msg.pl Do you wish to run Program? [Y/N]:hey@ubuntu:~/Desktop$ –  sirplzmywebsitelol Aug 10 '11 at 9:57
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When you wonder what's going on, start tracing your input. Ensure it is what you think it is:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

print "Do you wish to run Program? [Y/N]:";
$answer = <>;

print "Answer is [$answer]\n";

Since you put the braces around the variable, you'll notice any extra whitespace. You should see extra stuff in $answer:

Answer is [Y
]

That's your clue that you need to do something to handle that.

And, strict and warnings help you find problems before they are problems.

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Probably it will be better to use Term::Prompt or IO::Prompt. Don't reinvent the wheel :)

use IO::Prompt;
prompt -yn, 'Do you wish to run Program?' or exit;
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3  
No, reinvent the wheel when you are learning. Really. You'll never learn to program if you don't do it yourself a couple of times. :) –  brian d foy Aug 10 '11 at 13:02
    
I agree, at least for the small things like prompts. Of course you don't want someone reimplementing an XML parser of LWP or DBI etc. –  Joel Berger Aug 10 '11 at 16:45
    
Yes, I want someone reinventing LWP. I've been using Mojolicious for everything I used to use LWP for, and it's much easier to work with and extend. If Sebastian never reinvented it, I wouldn't have gotten something better. I wish someone would reinvent the XML parser. –  brian d foy Aug 10 '11 at 17:01
    
@brian, interesting, guess you got me there, I never thought of using Mojolicious outside of its stated purpose, I'll take a look –  Joel Berger Aug 10 '11 at 17:34
    
@bryan, right! But you find Mojolicious extremly useful and you don't rewrite it everytime you need to. –  Dimitar Petrov Aug 12 '11 at 14:18
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You have newline character, chomp $answer and $answer eq "Y"

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I tried the chomp but the code continues to fail on me. #! usr/bin/perl print "Do you wish to run Program? [Y/N]:"; chomp($answer); if($answer eq "Y") { print "COOOL\n"; } else { system "exit" } –  sirplzmywebsitelol Aug 10 '11 at 9:57
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You are using a numerical == to compare your strings.

You probably want to use "eq":

if($answer eq "Y") {
    print "COOOL\n";
} else {
     system "exit"
}

And as others have suggested you'll want to remove the newline at the end. Use chomp.

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1  
"probably" ? :) –  Karoly Horvath Aug 10 '11 at 9:40
    
@yi_H ha, yep that should probably read "definitely". For this example anyway. Perl happily allows you to try to use == for string comparison, so I assume it does have it's uses (reference equality presumably). –  Tom Jefferys Aug 10 '11 at 9:45
    
nope. "x" == "y". it just tries to interpret it as a number. "0x" != "1y" –  Karoly Horvath Aug 10 '11 at 9:50
    
Didn't know that! Thanks. –  Tom Jefferys Aug 10 '11 at 9:58
    
@yi_H where do you get the "1y"? All text strings used in numeric context try to extract a leading number value which defaults to 0 if not found perl -E 'say("x" + 0)' vs perl -E 'say("5x" + 0) (note adding zero forces numeric context just as == does) –  Joel Berger Aug 10 '11 at 17:06
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Besides the chomp/chop and eq vs ==, you also need to keep in mind the case of the answer. You are testing for UPPERCASE 'Y', I'm willing to bet you are entering lowercase 'y' and they are not equal. I would suggest using:

 if (($answer eq 'y') || ($answer eq 'Y')) {

or use uc.

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1  
Perl doesn't have "toupper". You're thinking of "uc". –  Dave Cross Aug 10 '11 at 15:02
    
if ($answer =~ /y/i) { do stuff } allows yY and yes and YES etc. True there may be false positives like Yukon but I only worry about that for big projects or as suggested below use IO::Prompt etc. –  Joel Berger Aug 10 '11 at 16:57
    
Dave, you have editing powers :) –  brian d foy Aug 10 '11 at 16:59
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