Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm restructuring a page for a client at -removed by author- (it's in Hebrew, but that's irrelevant).
I'm having some CSS problems with the footer (gray background) - I want the gray background to fit according to the content inside that box - so if the list grows the background div's height increases, and if the list shrinks, so does the background. I know this can be achieved with 100% height, and I know the basics of the concept. I understand that the parent containers must be set to 100% height as well, and that way the background will stretch.
But if you look at the footer on the page I linked to, and the 2 containers it's in, it's stretching down much farther than it should (using Web Developer Toolbar you can see each container's height). Also, it's containers seem to be set at different heights, even though they should also be stretching according to the content.
I tried putting height, min-height, clear and positioning settings everywhere - I just can't get it to work right.
I know the whole "CSS 100% height" question is pretty common. Believe me, I've read and I've searched for someone with this same issue - but I found nothing.

share|improve this question
1  
You forgot to add the link. Also, a few line breaks in your post would make it much more readable, and make it more likely that you get help. –  daveyfaherty Aug 10 '11 at 10:22
    
I didn't forget, I just didn't want to actually link to it because of my client - please forgive me for that. Also - only just noticed I can apply line breaks with HTML. –  Rick Anthony Aug 10 '11 at 11:09
    
Ah, I know how that is. Glad you got your problem solved anyway! –  daveyfaherty Aug 10 '11 at 12:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Padding, margin and borders are not counted in the height and width, so 100% height or width on an element with 10px padding on each side will actually take up 100% plus 20 pixels. And add even more if you're using margin and borders.

The way around this is to use the CSS box-sizing:border-box; property, which allows you to switch the box model so that borders and padding are taken into account (margin still remains outside the box, so if you're using 100%, don't use margins).

This effectively makes the box model work in the same way as the old Quirks Mode box model.

Find out more about the box-sizing feature here: http://css-tricks.com/7323-box-sizing/

box-sizing has fairly good cross-browser support, but note that it doesn't work in IE7 or below, and requires a vendor prefix for some browsers.

See more about the browser support here: http://caniuse.com/#search=box-sizing

share|improve this answer
    
You're a life-saver, this has been driving me crazy. When I read about box-sizing a while ago, I never really thought to use it because I was worried about the compatibility issues in older browsers. But I see now that box-sizing was indeed the answer to my mystery. Also, I have to thank @ItaiSagi for his comment, because without <div style="clear:both;"></div> right after my ul, the background didn't stretch. Cheers to both of you. –  Rick Anthony Aug 10 '11 at 11:35
    
@RickAnthony Good old crossbrowser inner element solution: jsfiddle.net/nrNyU Above is the problem, below is the solution. ( Also in the code. comment line separates. ) –  Joonas Aug 10 '11 at 12:56
    
@Lollero Thanks, that illustrates it very well. Didn't know about JSFiddle - it'll definitely come in handy. –  Rick Anthony Aug 10 '11 at 13:44

This is a wild guess, because there's no link. Do the divs have padding? Padding is always added to a div's height, even that height is 100%.

share|improve this answer

Don't do that to yourself... Just clear it.

float the <ul>'s to the left or right, and add a <div style='clear:both'> right before the end of parent div.

Behatzlacha, ahi.

share|improve this answer
    
Hahaha thank you –  Rick Anthony Aug 10 '11 at 11:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.