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I need to define a read and a print function for a class that has an array of objects as a private variable. I have to read in objects from a text file and print them to the screen. To do this I need to overload the << and >> operators. I understand I need to use loops to read and print the information stored in the array but I'm not sure how to accomplish this. My lecturer has given us a skeleton code which is basically function prototypes and the main function which I need to stick to. I understand how this works with public structs as I have done this exact scenario using that but the private variables of class' are tripping me up.

class EmployeeList {
public:
  //Constructors
  EmployeeList();
  EmployeeList(istream&);
  //Accessors
  bool isEmpty() const;
  bool isFull() const;
  int size() const; //Number of employees in list
  Employee item(int i) const; //i'th employee
  //Mutators
  void setItem(int i,const Employee& e);
  //I/O functions, sets the i'th emplyee to e
  void read(istream&);
  void print(ostream&) const;

private:
  enum {MAXSIZE = 100};
  Employee list[MAXSIZE];
  int count; //Number of employees in the current list
};

EmployeeList::EmployeeList() {
  count = 0;
}

EmployeeList::EmployeeList(istream& in) {
  //list[MAXSIZE] = in;
}

bool EmployeeList::isEmpty() const {
  return (count == 0);
}

bool EmployeeList::isFull() const {
  return (count == MAXSIZE);
}

int EmployeeList::size() const {
  return count;
}

Employee EmployeeList::item(int i) const {
}

void EmployeeList::setItem(int i, const Employee& e) {
}

void EmployeeList::read(istream& in) {
  Employee tempList;
  while (in >> tempList) {
  }
}

void EmployeeList::print(ostream& out) const {
  for (int i=0; i < size(); i++) {
  }

  cout << out;
}

The above part is the Class EmployeeList while the below part are overloading functions. The commented out parts are ideas that I thought might work but didn't.

istream& operator>>(istream& in, EmployeeList& l) {
  l.read(in);
  return in;
}

ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const EmployeeList& l) {
  l.print(out);
  return out;
}

Below is the main function given to us.

int main() {
  authorInfo();
  ifstream infile("a1in.txt");
  if(!infile) {
      cout << "file 'alin.txt' not found.";
      return EXIT_FAILURE;
  }
  EmployeeList theList(infile);

  cout << endl;
  cout << theList.size() << " employees read:\n" << theList << endl;
  process(theList);
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;

}

Hope someone can steer me in the right direction! Let me know if you need more of the code. Thanks!

EDIT: Employee read and print functions:

void Employee::read(istream& in) {
  in >> name >> id >> salary;
}

void Employee::print(ostream& out) const {
  out << getName() <<" "<< getID() <<" "<< getSalary() << endl;
}

Employee overloading:

istream& operator>>(istream& in, Employee& e) {
  e.read(in);
  return in;
}

ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const Employee& e) {
  e.print(out);
  return out;
}

EDIT 2: Updated read() function. The line with the while is where the error is.

void EmployeeList::read(istream& in) {
  Employee inEmployee;
  while (in >> inEmployee && count < MAXSIZE) {
      list[count] = inEmployee;
      count++;
  }
}

EDIT 3: Here is the print() function I have so far. It does indeed print but I get the default constructor information rather than information from the file. Is this a read or print function issue? I'm thinking read function still.

void EmployeeList::print(ostream& out) const {
  cout << endl;
  for (int i=0; i < count; i++) {
      out << list[count];
  }
} 
share|improve this question
    
Why is the private variable tripping you up? In the public section a quick glance looks like all you should need is there.. –  BugFinder Aug 10 '11 at 11:25
    
Whitespace in name, id, or salary will break Employee::read. –  Mike DeSimone Aug 11 '11 at 6:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Array Bounds

In your class, you have:

Employee list[MAXSIZE];

Given this, there is an error the code you tried:

EmployeeList::EmployeeList(istream& in) {
  list[MAXSIZE] = in;
}

list only has elements from list[0] to list[MAXSIZE - 1]. list[MAXSIZE] is one past the end of the array, and is invalid.

Constructors

That said, I'd strongly recommend against having a constructor that takes an istream&. It is far better to construct an empty object with the default constructor, then use its read(istream&) method (via operator <<) to load the data. In other words, rather than:

EmployeeList theList(infile);

use:

EmployeeList theList;
infile >> theList;

If you're required to have a constructor that takes an istream&, just have it call read() after initializing the object:

EmployeeList::EmployeeList(istream& in): count(0) {
  read(in);
}

Note that only one constructor is called, so the initialization in EmployeeList::EmployeeList() does not happen in EmployeeList::EmployeeList(istream&). I hear the new version of C++ deals with this unnecessary repetition, but for the time being that's where we are.

Naming

Another thing: your code will be less confusing with better variable names. In this case:

void EmployeeList::read(istream& in) {
  Employee tempList;
  while (in >> tempList) {
  }
}

Don't say tempList because it's not a "temporary list", it's a single Employee that has been read. Better would be:

void EmployeeList::read(istream& in) {
  Employee inEmployee;
  while (in >> inEmployee) {
    list[count++] = inEmployee;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks this was all very helpful! –  RedFred Aug 10 '11 at 12:36
    
+1 for sound advice. I disagree with the recommendation against writing a constructor that takes an istream&, though: if you want an immutable object loaded from a stream, that's a good way to go about getting it. –  Jon Purdy Aug 11 '11 at 3:00
    
I can see your point, but recommend against it for two reasons: 1) it violates DRY since it has to repeat at least the default constructor's code (fixed in C++11) and 2) implicit typecast from istream to EmployeeList could be surprising (solved by using the explicit keyword). So not a show stopper, but not things I'd want to put in an introductory course ("The C++ you're using is not standard C++, run in fear"). –  Mike DeSimone Aug 11 '11 at 3:05
    
Do you guys have any thoughts on my current read and print functions? (Edit 2 and 3). I think it's to do with my read function still. –  RedFred Aug 11 '11 at 3:20
    
Put a cerr << inEmployee; in your read() function's while loop. Also, the count < MAXSIZE test should be its own if() statement in the loop, resulting in a print to cerr and a break if the list runs out of space. –  Mike DeSimone Aug 11 '11 at 6:26

This looks like a homework so i'll try to just give you a hint:

void EmployeeList::read(istream& in) {

  Employee tempList;
  while (in >> tempList) {
  //here you are creating a tempList so after you fill in the values in tempList 
  //the tempList is to become a part of Employee list[MAXSIZE]; 
  }
}

and how do you fill in the values? You do this using your constructor and maintaining the count

EmployeeList::EmployeeList(istream& in) {
  //here...
}
share|improve this answer

You could start off by figuring out how to read in input. The approach, which is likely incomplete, that I would take is this:

EmployeeList::EmployeeList(istream& in) {
  count = 0;
  read(in);    // delegate it to avoid duplication
}

void EmployeeList::read(istream& in) {
  Employee tempList;
  while (in >> tempList && count < MAXSIZE) {
    list[count] = tempList;
    ++count;
  }
}

You will need to overload operator>> for Employee class for this to work.

share|improve this answer
    
I am getting an "error: no match for 'operator>>' in 'in >> inEmployee'" when I compile now. Would this be to do with my Employee class? Would it help if you could see that also? –  RedFred Aug 10 '11 at 12:35
    
Have you overloaded operator>> for Employee class as I suggested? In your code, only overload for EmployeeList class is shown. –  Martinsh Shaiters Aug 10 '11 at 12:45
    
Yes I have in the same fashion as with EmployeeList. –  RedFred Aug 10 '11 at 12:52
    
Could you post your current code for EmployeeList::read()? –  Martinsh Shaiters Aug 10 '11 at 13:01
    
Added it as an edit. –  RedFred Aug 10 '11 at 21:23

Here is how I would write this, without the skeleton constraint. Feel free to adapt to your assignment requirements.

Source: http://www.ideone.com/R9EeF

Iostreams are hard to master. You have to read about std::getline, the std::ios flags and stringstreams to understand how to parse an employee list with them.

I prefer giving you a working template (that you cannot use for your assignment since I don't make use of the skeleton at all), since there is a lot to say about iostreams.

Also feel free to ask questions, so that I can enhance my answer with your actual problems.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty sure we can't use stringstream and I'm not sure I would need to? Also we can't use vectors it must use classes. Due to this I don't really know about either of those things which means I can't really follow your code very well. –  RedFred Aug 10 '11 at 21:10
    
@RedFred: I use vector because otherwise it is very difficult to roll back if the read failed. Also stringstream is very convenient once you have read a string delimited by a character, but not strictly necessary. I repeat: writing a correct istream reader is very cumbersome, the code I show you is only intended to show a way to do it correctly. It is intended to be read, (at least superficially) understood, and used as a template, not copied and pasted into your assignment. –  Alexandre C. Aug 10 '11 at 21:34

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