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I have a variable with a type similar to:

map<bool, map<string, pair<string, int> > > items;

which I pass around to different functions.

Is there a less tedious way for me to iterate over it then saying

for (map<bool, map<string, pair<string, int> > >::iterator p = items.begin();
    p != items.end(); p++)
    ...

every time? (i.e. can I somehow omit the type name, with a macro or template or something? A manual typedef doesn't count.)

I'm using Visual C++ 2008.

share|improve this question
8  
A map with a bool key? Are you sure you need that? – 6502 Aug 10 '11 at 11:33
    
@6502: Right now it's representing 64-bit vs. 32-bit, but it'll likely change at some point (becoming an enum or int or whatever, since it could also be both, neither, IA64, etc...). That's somewhat beside the point, though. :P – Mehrdad Aug 10 '11 at 11:34
3  
In C++0x (supported in Visual C++ 2010 and GCC 4.4+), you can use range-based for loops: for (auto idx: items) { ... } – Norcalli Aug 10 '11 at 11:35
    
@Norcalli: Right, but that's exactly why I said VC++ 2008. :) – Mehrdad Aug 10 '11 at 11:40
1  
@Alex, VC++ 2010 implements C++0x, though not all of it. Range based for-loops are not imlpemented. But for this case, auto keyword can be used. – Ajay Aug 11 '11 at 4:15
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use BOOST_FOREACH. You'll have to use a typedef for clarity though:

typedef std::map<std::string, std::pair<std::string, int> > inner_map;
typedef std::pair<bool, inner_map> map_entry;

BOOST_FOREACH(map_entry& p, items)
{
    ...
}

I prefer a plain typedef and a for loop though. I see typedef the same way I see a variable assignment:

typedef std::map<std::string, std::pair<std::string, int> > inner_map;
typedef std::map<bool, inner_map>::iterator map_iterator;

for (map_iterator i = items.begin(); i != items.end(); ++i)
{
    ...
}

Those typedefs can also be private members. This coding style is much clearer, since you see at a glance the types involved.

Or you can use plain std::for_each, if you are ready to write a functor. I don't really like this in standard C++ since the loop body is no longer local (this can be an advantage in some cases however):

struct some_functor
{
    template <typename K, typename V>
    void operator()(std::pair<K, V>& item)
    {
        // In the context below, K is bool and
        // V is map<string, pair<string, int> >
    }
};

and then later

std::for_each(items.begin(), items.end(), some_functor());

If you upgrade to VS2010, you have alternatives: auto and std::for_each with a lambda (which I prefer). With C++0x, technically, you also have range-based for loops (not available in VS2010).

To conclude, I'd do:

class meaningful_data
{
    typedef std::map<std::string, std::pair<std::string, int> > inner_map;
    std::map<bool, inner_map> items;

public:
    typedef std::pair<bool, inner_map> value_type;
    typedef std::map<bool, inner_map>::iterator iterator;
    typedef std::map<bool, inner_map>::const_iterator const_iterator;

    iterator begin() { return items.begin(); }
    const_iterator begin() const { return items.begin(); }
    iterator end() { return items.end(); }
    const_iterator end() const { return items.end(); }

    // Add some interface here (as small as possible)
};

and iterate like this:

for (meaningful_data::iterator i = d.begin(); i != d.end(); ++i)
{
    ...
}

or

BOOST_FOREACH(meaningful_data::value_type& i, d)
{
    ...
}

You'll probably want to encapsulate such a complex type, at least with a few typedefs (you're not forced to use a full blown class if the inner_map type ought to be public).

share|improve this answer
    
OK it seems like BOOST_FOREACH is what I need, except for the fact that Boost is like 32,000+ files (I'm already hesitant of adding one extra file...) and 40 MiB compressed, which is a little ridiculous for what I'm trying to do. Is there a more "lightweight" version? (I can't figure out how they did it, otherwise I'd try implementing it myself...) – Mehrdad Aug 10 '11 at 11:45
    
@Mehrdad: it is very tricky to implement. Since it is a macro, you must not evaluate the arguments more than once. See artima.com/cppsource/foreach.html for how they did it. Not worth the trouble IMO. Just use a typedef. – Alexandre C. Aug 10 '11 at 11:46
    
Edit -- BOOST_FOREACH is actually apparently still not what I need, since I need to declare the key's data type! :( – Mehrdad Aug 10 '11 at 11:48
    
@Mehrdad: forget about deducing the data type for you. This is not possible in standard C++. The closest you can get to it is std::for_each + functor with template operator(). – Alexandre C. Aug 10 '11 at 11:50

I recommend using typedef, which is probably a way of saying "no, you can't" ;)

Otherwise, if you were to switch to a compiler that supports auto as defined in C++0x, you could say:

for (auto p = items.begin(); p != items.end(); ++p) // ...

(Oh, by the way, I also recommend ++p to avoid copying the iterator)

share|improve this answer
1  
I might be wrong and this is a bit off-topic, but can't we assume that any decent and modern compiler will "replace" any x++ by ++x for standard types when the return value is not used ? – ereOn Aug 10 '11 at 12:05
2  
@ereOn: The way I see it is why bother not using ++x? Sure, the compiler might optimize it, but it might not. Why should I tell it to do something I don't want, relying on the compiler to change it into something that I do want, when I could just tell it what I wanted in the first place? :) – Magnus Hoff Aug 10 '11 at 12:19
    
@ere0n - Depends on what you mean by standard types. In general, ++x might be totally different from x++, so the compiler cannot assume they do the same if the result isn't used. However, it can cull the copy of the iterator with x++ (even if it has side effects, this is explicitly allowed). – ltjax Aug 10 '11 at 12:31
    
+1 for recommending a typedef (to the OP: what's wrong with a typedef solution?), and if I could, +1 again for ++p. Even though the name of the language is C++, the standard idiom in C++ is to always use ++c unless you really, really do want c++ for its return value. This is exactly opposite the standard idiom in C, which is to use c++ unless you really, really do want ++c for its return value. Willy nilly use of c++ in C++ code is a dead giveaway that the programmer in question is a C++ newbie. – David Hammen Aug 10 '11 at 12:44
    
@Magnus Hoff: You are absolutely right. I also use the prefixed form whenever I can. I just wanted to make sure what I believed was right: it's better to use ++x instead of x++ when possible, but it doesn't cost much if you don't. Thanks for the clarification. – ereOn Aug 10 '11 at 16:09

You could use the standard for_each algorithm:

#include <algorithm>

struct your_functor {
  template<typename T>
  void operator()(T const &item) {
    // Your loop body here.
  }
}

std::for_each(items.begin(), items.end(), your_functor());
share|improve this answer

You can use BOOST_AUTO

share|improve this answer

You can write your own algorithm function.

template<class C>
void do_what_I_want_to_do(C& c)
{
    for (C::iterator i = c.begin(); i != c.end(); ++c)
    {
        // do something
    }
}

do_what_I_want_to_do(items);

That may or may not be an improvement for you.

share|improve this answer

Sure, use typedefs:

typedef std::map<std::string, std::pair<std::string, int> > Item;
typedef Item::const_iterator                                ItemCItr;

typedef std::map<bool, Item>                                ItemMap;
typedef ItemMap::const_iterator                             ItemMapItr;

for (ItemMapItr it = m.begin(), end = m.end(); it != end; ++it)
{
  const Item & item = it->second;

  for (ItemItr jt = item.begin(), jend = item.end(); jt != jend; ++jt)
  {
     /* ... */
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
"...A manual typedef doesn't count." – Nick Dandoulakis Aug 10 '11 at 11:36
    
@Nick: Oh OK, never mind then. I think that's still the prettiest solution in general and outside C++0x, but I appreciate that that's not what the OP is after. – Kerrek SB Aug 10 '11 at 11:38

After seeing all the "no you can't do this" answers, I took some time to try to find at least a partial workaround.

This version almost works, with the caveat that every reference to the iterator also requires a reference to the container. It might not be a good idea to actually use this (because of the heap allocation and other things) but I thought I'd share it anyway:

#include <map>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template<typename T>
bool _end(T& src, void *iterator = NULL)
{ return static_cast<typename T::iterator>(iterator) < src.end(); }

template<typename T>
struct _IterateHelper
{
    typename T::iterator *pIterator;
    _IterateHelper(T& dummy, void *&p)
    { this->pIterator = static_cast<typename T::iterator *>(p); }
    ~_IterateHelper() { delete pIterator; }
};

template<typename T>
_IterateHelper<T> _iterateHelper(T& dummy, void *&p)
{ return _IterateHelper<T>(dummy, p); }

template<typename T>
bool _iterate(T& container, void *&iterator)
{
    typename T::iterator *&p =
        reinterpret_cast<typename T::iterator *&>(iterator);
    if (iterator == NULL) { p = new typename T::iterator(container.begin()); }
    else { ++*p; }
    return *p != container.end();
}

template<typename T>
typename T::iterator & I(T& container, void *&pIterator)
{ return *static_cast<typename T::iterator *>(pIterator); }

#define FOR_EACH(state, container) \
    void *state = NULL; \
    for (_iterateHelper(container, state); _iterate(container, state); )


int main()
{
    map<string, string> m;
    items["a"] = "b";
    items["1"] = "2";
    FOR_EACH(p, items)
        cout << I(items, p)->first << ": " << I(items, p)->second << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your macro leaks a local variable into the ambient scope, that may lead to problems. Also, identifiers beginning with underscore-capital are reserved for the compiler and the standard library, do not define such identifiers. – Kerrek SB Aug 10 '11 at 16:47
    
@Kerrek: (1) That can be easily scoped with { }. (2) I considered this to be part of some 'standard library' that one could theoretically make; that's why I chose the underscores. :P But yeah, I'm aware of that. The goal wasn't to actually put this in production, but just to give it a try and see what happens. – Mehrdad Aug 10 '11 at 17:12

Qt offers its own foreach implementation, so i just reworked it for std::map - basically just a simple modification (->second). Tested on MSVC and gcc.

struct ForeachBaseBase {};

template <typename T1, typename T2>
class ForeachBase: public ForeachBaseBase
{
public:
    inline ForeachBase(const std::map<T1,T2>& t): c(t), brk(0), i(c.begin()), e(c.end()){}
    const std::map<T1,T2> c;
    mutable int brk;
    mutable typename std::map<T1,T2>::const_iterator i, e;
    inline bool condition() const { return (!brk++ && i != e);}
};

template <typename T1, typename T2> inline std::map<T1,T2> *pMForeachPointer(const std::map<T1,T2> &) { return 0; }

template <typename T1, typename T2> inline ForeachBase<T1,T2> pMForeachBaseNew(const std::map<T1,T2>& t)
{ return ForeachBase<T1,T2>(t); }

template <typename T1, typename T2>
inline const ForeachBase<T1,T2> *pMForeachBase(const ForeachBaseBase *base, const std::map<T1,T2> *)
{ return static_cast<const ForeachBase<T1,T2> *>(base); }


#if defined(Q_CC_MIPS)
/*
   Proper for-scoping in MIPSpro CC
*/
#  define MAP_FOREACH(variable,container)                                                             \
    if(0){}else                                                                                     \
    for (const ForeachBaseBase &_container_ = pMForeachBaseNew(container);                \
         pMForeachBase(&_container_, true ? 0 : pMForeachPointer(container))->condition();       \
         ++pMForeachBase(&_container_, true ? 0 : pMForeachPointer(container))->i)               \
        for (variable = pMForeachBase(&_container_, true ? 0 : pMForeachPointer(container))->i->second; \
             pMForeachBase(&_container_, true ? 0 : pMForeachPointer(container))->brk;           \
             --pMForeachBase(&_container_, true ? 0 : pMForeachPointer(container))->brk)

#elif defined(Q_CC_DIAB)
// VxWorks DIAB generates unresolvable symbols, if container is a function call
#  define MAP_FOREACH(variable,container)                                                             \
    if(0){}else                                                                                     \
    for (const ForeachBaseBase &_container_ = pMForeachBaseNew(container);                \
         pMForeachBase(&_container_, (__typeof__(container) *) 0)->condition();       \
         ++pMForeachBase(&_container_, (__typeof__(container) *) 0)->i)               \
        for (variable = pMForeachBase(&_container_, (__typeof__(container) *) 0)->i->second; \
             pMForeachBase(&_container_, (__typeof__(container) *) 0)->brk;           \
             --pMForeachBase(&_container_, (__typeof__(container) *) 0)->brk)

#else
#  define MAP_FOREACH(variable, container) \
    for (const ForeachBaseBase &_container_ = pMForeachBaseNew(container); \
         pMForeachBase(&_container_, true ? 0 : pMForeachPointer(container))->condition();       \
         ++pMForeachBase(&_container_, true ? 0 : pMForeachPointer(container))->i)               \
        for (variable = pMForeachBase(&_container_, true ? 0 : pMForeachPointer(container))->i->second; \
             pMForeachBase(&_container_, true ? 0 : pMForeachPointer(container))->brk;           \
             --pMForeachBase(&_container_, true ? 0 : pMForeachPointer(container))->brk)
#endif // MSVC6 || MIPSpro

#define mforeach MAP_FOREACH
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