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I recently started to develop an iPhone App. Coming from C#, Objective-C has some traps for me. I dont't understand what happened in the following snippet:

@interface RootViewController : UITableViewController {
    NSString *simpleProperty;
    NSString *propertyWithUnderscoreIvar;
}

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *simpleProperty;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *propertyWithUnderscoreIvar;

@end

@implementation RootViewController

@synthesize simpleProperty;
@synthesize propertyWithUnderscoreIvar = _propertyWithUnderscoreIvar;

- (NSString *)simpleProperty {
    return @"Simple property value";
}
- (NSString *)propertyWithUnderscoreIvar {
    return @"Property with underscore value";
}

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i %@", 1, simpleProperty]);
    // --> 1 (null)

    NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i %@", 2, propertyWithUnderscoreIvar]);
    // --> 2 (null)

    NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i %@", 3, _propertyWithUnderscoreIvar]);
    // --> 3 (null)

    NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i %@", 4, self.simpleProperty]);
    // --> 4 Simple property value

    NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i %@", 5, self.propertyWithUnderscoreIvar]);
    // --> 5 Property with underscore value
}

Why are the first three outputs null? Is my own implementation for the properties incorrect?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your viewDidLoad method you are logging the values of your instance variables (ivars), not your properties. From your code sample above:

@interface RootViewController : UITableViewController {
     NSString *simpleProperty;
     NSString *propertyWithUnderscoreIvar;
}

This declares two variables in your class - simpleProperty and propertyWithUnderscoreIvar. The following code, on the other hand, declares the properties:

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *simpleProperty;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *propertyWithUnderscoreIvar;

These are declarations only. Objective C is somewhat similar to C#, in that it provides you with easy ways to generate getter's and setters for your class properties. In Objective-C this is done via the @synthesize keyword (which is roughly analogous to C# automatic properties).

@synthesize simpleProperty;
@synthesize propertyWithUnderscoreIvar = _propertyWithUnderscoreIvar;

Those @synthesize keywords in your implementation file create getter and setter methods for you, for your properties. Your first synthesize looks good, it will create a getter and setter for 'simpleProperty', backed by the instance variable of the same name. Your second @synthesize is hokey though. It will create a getter and setter for 'propertyWithUnderscoreIvar', backed by the instance variable '_propertyWithUnderscoreIvar', which you never declared. This code will work on modern runtimes but not legacy ones (note that even on modern runtimes, your 'propertyWithUnderscoreIvar' ivar will be ignored by the @synthesize).

Now as to why your code is printing nulls, in your logging code you do this:

NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i %@", 1, simpleProperty]);

This is accessing the instance variable directly. But you haven't set the instance variable to any value at this point. What you really meant to do is access the property, like so:

NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i %@", 1, [self simpleProperty]);

Using [self simpleProperty] instead will invoke the method simpleProperty and return your hard coded value, which is what you're trying to do.

share|improve this answer
    
@Sandro - I was editing when you made that comment. See the expanded answer for where you are declaring ivars. – Perception Aug 10 '11 at 12:30
    
I saw it, thanks. I rewrote the snippet a bit. Now I don't get the use of an underscore prefix for instance variables? – Sandro Aug 10 '11 at 12:52
    
Its a coding practice that helps to distinguish between the ivar and the property, and can help avoid the very same problem you ran into (accidentally using the ivar when you really meant to use the property). – Perception Aug 10 '11 at 12:54
    
Do I even need ivars? When I just use properties, I don't have to distinguish between ivars and properties... – Sandro Aug 10 '11 at 13:19
    
There are some advantages to using ivars, even on modern runtimes. But in the end that's up to you to decide. – Perception Aug 10 '11 at 13:22

In order to access the getter/setter methods you should use self or any instance.

NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i %@", 1, self.simpleProperty]);

The above line will print @"Simple property value" as you expect.

share|improve this answer
    
FWIW, no one seems to mention that he could call NSLog(@"%i: %@", 1, self.simpleProperty); directly. There is no need to use [NSString stringWithFormat: ...], as NSLog() already does something like it internally (I guess). – Rudy Velthuis Aug 10 '11 at 12:57

These

- (NSString *)simpleProperty {
    return @"Simple property value";
}
- (NSString *)propertyWithUnderscoreIvar {
    return @"Property with underscore value";
}

are accessors. In

NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i %@", 1, simpleProperty]);

you are accessing the ivar directly. Therefore these ivars are null as you haven't set anything to them. In

NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i %@", 4, self.simpleProperty]);

you are accessing the ivar via the accessor. Therefore the runtime calls your accessor. In my opinion, when you use @synthesize you shouldn't write your own accessors. At least when you just started to write in Objective C. In addition your accessor is kind of strange.

share|improve this answer
    
But I don't declare any instance variables. There is only 1 implicit declaration: @synthesize propertyWithUnderscoreIvar = _propertyWithUnderscoreIvar; – Sandro Aug 10 '11 at 12:26
    
Your @synthesize creates instance variables for your properties. It has to store them somewhere. – Terry Wilcox Aug 10 '11 at 12:30

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