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I use the named constructor idiom to create objects, because I have lots of calls with identical parameters but the object shall be created differently.

The C++ FAQ tell us how to do this. It also tells us how to force objects being heap allocated. Yet it really fails to tell us how to use the named constructor idiom with the new operator.

Because new requires a constructor to be called we cannot directly call named constructors. So I found two workarounds to this problem:

I create an additional copy constructor and hope that optimizing compilers won't create a temporary object.

class point_t {
    int X,Y;
    point_t(int x, int y) : X(x), Y(y) { }
  public:
    point_t(const point_t &x) : X(x.X), Y(x.Y) { }
    static point_t carthesian(int x, int y) { return point_t(x,y); }
    static point_t polar(float radius, float angle) {
      return point_t(radius*std::cos(angle), radius*std::sin(angle));
    }

    void add(int x, int y) { X += x; Y += y; }
};



int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  /* XXX: hope that compiler doesn't create a temporary */
  point_t *x = new point_t(point_t::carthesian(1,2));
  x->add(1,2);
}

The other version is to create separate named constructors. Because function overloading doesn't work on return type I use two different names, which is ugly.

class point_t {
    int X,Y;
    point_t(int x, int y) : X(x), Y(y) { }
  public:
    /* XXX: function overloading doesn't work on return types */
    static point_t carthesian(int x, int y) { return point_t(x,y); }
    static point_t *carthesian_heap(int x, int y) { return new point_t(x,y); }
    void add(int x, int y) { X += x; Y += y; }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  point_t *x = point_t::carthesian_heap(1,2);
  x->add(1,2);
}

Is there a prettier version that is equal to the example code?

share|improve this question
1  
Make your class moveable and the first code won't result in any copy (not that it will matter for two ints). Also do you really need heap allocation? – Cat Plus Plus Aug 10 '11 at 12:36
    
what do you mean by the term movable? The real class is actually a lot bigger than this and creating a copy will result in a noticeable penalty. That's the reason it should be heap allocated most of the time, but sometimes stack allocation is useful though. – Alex Aug 10 '11 at 12:44
1  
Moveable is a C++11 concept -- learn about rvalue references (the new && things). It will get you what you want, I think -- if the class is moveable, then it can be passed to the copy constructor but actually just be initialized in place. If you can't use C++11 just yet, then I think you are stuck. None of the proposed solutions actually get you what you want, they just re-arrange the code. – mgiuca Jan 10 '13 at 12:31
up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can avoid named constructor idiom for this completely, and do it using an additonal dummy enum parameter to select the constructor.

enum Carthesian {carthesian};
enum Polar {polar};
class point_t {
    int X,Y;
  public:
    point_t(int x, int y) : X(x), Y(y) { } // may keep as a default
    point_t(Carthesian, int x, int y) :X(x),Y(y){}
    point_t(Polar, float radius, float angle)
    : X (radius*std::cos(angle)), Y(radius*std::sin(angle)) {}
    void add(int x, int y) { X += x; Y += y; }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  point_t *x = new point_t(carthesian,1,2);
  point_t *y = new point_t(polar,0,3);
  x->add(1,2);
}

It is simple, portable, and the only overhead you will see is for the passing of the dummy enum values. In the rare case this overhead is too high for you it can be eliminated by wrapping a function call even when the construction itself is not inlined, as follows:

enum Carthesian {carthesian};
enum Polar {polar};
class point_t {
    int X,Y;
    void initCarthesian(int x, int y); // may be long, not inlined
    void initPolar(float radius, float angle);
  public:
    point_t(int x, int y) : X(x), Y(y) { } // may keep as a default
    point_t(Carthesian, int x, int y)
    {initCarthesian(x,y);} // this is short and inlined
    point_t(Polar, float radius, float angle) {initPolar(radius, angle);}
    void add(int x, int y) { X += x; Y += y; }
};

Another approach is to use a derived class for construction. When using inner classes, it leads into quite a nice syntax I think:

class point_t {
    int X,Y;
  public:
    struct carthesian;
    struct polar;
    point_t(int x, int y) : X(x), Y(y) { } // may keep as a default
    void add(int x, int y) { X += x; Y += y; }
};

struct point_t::carthesian: public point_t
{
  carthesian(int x, int y):point_t(x,y){}
};

struct point_t::polar: public point_t
{
  polar(float radius, float angle):point_t(radius*std::cos(angle),radius*std::sin(angle)){}
};

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  point_t *x = new point_t::carthesian(1,2);
  point_t *y = new point_t::polar(0,3);
  x->add(1,2);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
A similar approach would be to introduce specific types for some constructor arguments. You could for instance define a Radius class and an Angle class with a single explicit constructor taking a float and a conversion to float. – Nicola Musatti Aug 10 '11 at 13:41
    
To "force objects being heap allocated", as the OP mentions (but does not state is a requirement), make the destructor protected or private. Preferably the former. And add either a destroy function or friendship to a common destroy function. In C++98 the closest you get to a common destroy function in the standard library, is std::auto_ptr, but it doesn't handle arrays. In C++0x you have instead the std::unique_ptr machinery. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 10 '11 at 13:57
    
@Suma: Actually I meant adding classes such as Radius and Angle, but your approach is also valid. I'd make point_t constructor protected, though. – Nicola Musatti Aug 12 '11 at 11:54
    
@Nicola: an interesting (and to me a novel) approach. If you base your own answer on it, I will definitely give it an upvote. – Suma Aug 12 '11 at 13:40
    
@Suma. Your proposal is superior to the named constructors idiom which I considered harmful. Firstly, premature conversions will be made when using polar coordinates. This introduces numerical errors for no good reason. Secondly to my experience take a big risk when selecting a strategy that is not preserving indata as it is. Sooner or later a requirement on knowing the original definition pops up and then it will be a mess. – Frodo Aug 9 '13 at 6:03

You could write :

point_t *x = new point_t(point_t::carthesian(1,2));

It first calls carthesian() and then the copy-constructor.

Or, is there any problem in it? Perhaps, a bit slow?

By the way, there is one clear advantage in this code: the programmer can clearly see the new operator in his code (where he is using point_t written by someone else), so you can assume that its his responsibility to call delete once he is done with x.

share|improve this answer

Is this really a problem? In my experience classes tend to be either dynamically allocated most of the time or seldom, if at all. Classes that represent values, such as your point_t class here, belong to the second category, while classes that represent entities (i.e. something with identity) belong to the first one.

So my suggestion is to chose what you think is the best approach for each class and only provide that. Note that you could always return a small directly allocated object which has a private pointer to a larger one, as in the Handle-Body idiom.

On the other hand, other answers show how you may disambiguate among constructors that take arguments of the same number and types. In this line of thought, one alternative approach is to introduce specific types for the arguments as follows:

class radius_t {
    float R;
  public:
    explicit radius_t(float r) : R(r) {}
    operator float() const { return R; }
};

class angle_t {
    float A;
  public:
    explicit angle_t(float a) : A(a) {}
    operator float() const { return A; }
};

class point_t {
    float X,Y;
  public:
    point_t(float x, float y) : X(x), Y(y) { }
    point_t(radius_t radius, angle_t angle) :
      X(radius*std::cos(angle)), Y((radius*std::sin(angle)) {
    }

    void add(int x, int y) { X += x; Y += y; }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  point_t *x = new point_t(radius_t(1),angle_t(2));
  x->add(1,2);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The class I intend to do this is a bit_vector and the ambiguous parameters are pointers and integers. I don't want to use std::vector<bool> because I use operator overloading. The bit vectors are used to specify binary encoding of instructions, hence passed as reference. The other use of this bit vector is to create masks, that select a certain part of the instruction, which is frequently changed and copied and thus stack allocated. So I cant choose one. – Alex Aug 10 '11 at 13:13
    
May ask why was this answer downvoted? – Nicola Musatti Aug 10 '11 at 13:34
    
@Alex: what you describe would seem to me a reasonable use case for the Handle-Body idiom. – Nicola Musatti Aug 10 '11 at 13:36
    
I didn't downvote. I just removed to upvote. The reason for this is simple, while the handle-body idiom seems nice to make shallow copies of objects it doesn't really solve my problem. I need both heap and stack allocated objects because I some instances should be destroyed at the end of a function and others are actually never destroyed. The handle-body doesn't get rid of this particular problem. However your answer wasn't useless, because I have other portions of the code, where this idiom is usefull to reduce header inclusion. – Alex Aug 11 '11 at 10:44
    
I see. I didn't realize that removing an upvote has the same effect than an upvote + a downvote. Anyway, I see your point and I like the answer you chose, even though I prefer the approach of providing specific types for existing arguments, as I mentioned in my comment. – Nicola Musatti Aug 11 '11 at 10:52

One approach that I haven't seen is overloading the constructor making the heap allocation use the last argument as an out one (Granted that the second function is not technically a constructor, it doesn't return an instance). The result would be something like (taken as base your second code fragment):

class point_t {
    int X,Y;
    point_t(int x, int y) : X(x), Y(y) { }
  public:
    /* XXX: function overloading doesn't work on return types */
    static point_t carthesian(const int x, const int y) { return point_t(x,y); }
    static void carthesian(const int x, const int y, point_t * & point) { point = new point_t(x,y); }
    void add(int x, int y) { X += x; Y += y; }
    void add(const point_t & point) { this->X += point.x; this->Y += point.y; }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    point_t p1 = point_t::carthesion(1, 2);
    point_t * p2;
    point_t::carthesian(1, 2, p2);

    p2->add(p1);
}
share|improve this answer

Can think of template allocator:

template<typename T>
struct Allocator : T
{
  template<typename A1, typename A2>
  Allocator(A1 a1, A2 a2) : T(a1, a2) {}
};

class point_t {
//...
  template<typename T> friend struct Allocator;
};

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  point_t *x = new Allocator<point_t>(1,2);
  x->add(1,2);
}

Now Allocator is friend of point_t. So it can access its private constructor. Also, you can add few more constructors like <A1, A2> inside Allocator to make it more generalized. Advantages are:

  1. It doesn't look verbose.
  2. You don't have to worry about compiler optimizations
  3. The friendship is not exploited as, Allocator is a template and we use it solely for heap allocation

Demo.

share|improve this answer
    
It creates the same problem OP is trying to solve with his named constructors. What is (1,2)? Is it (x,y) or (radius, angle)? – Nawaz Aug 10 '11 at 12:54
    
@Nawaz, the template<A1, A2> pattern should help it; isn't it ? OP can pass whatever (x,y) or (radius, angle). – iammilind Aug 10 '11 at 12:56
2  
You didn't understand my comment. The OP wants to pass either cartesian coordinates, or polar coordinates. Both happens to have same number of parameters, and same implicitly convertible types. So when you pass (1,2), are they cartesian or polar? Because in each case, the point_t object will be different. – Nawaz Aug 10 '11 at 13:02
    
@Nawaz, ok, I thought he is going to pass as (1,2) and (1.0f, 2.0f). In which case my logic should hold true. – iammilind Aug 10 '11 at 14:05
    
Even in that case that wouldn't work. – Nawaz Aug 10 '11 at 14:10

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