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I have a couple of million rows in a postgresql table. I have up to 20 proceeses writing to that table (a few hundred inserts/updates per second) and I have a few processes reading from it at the same time (once a while a big select). This results in many failures (Stream Closed, Input/Ouput Error) on both sides, reading and writing.

I now think about splitting that table into multiple tables. I would split by "type" of object, which is basically a field that has only 20 possible values that are kind of equally distributed.

The question is, should I use multiple tables, multiple schemas or multiple databases to guarantee a non blocking access to the data. Or maybe I should use a completly different setup. Another database maybe? Maybe HTable?

The integrity of the data is not that important. It has to be there in the end but I do not really need an Isolation Level or Transactions. I just need a fast system that can write and read from multiple processes without performance impact and that allows to make queries based on field values.

Right now I use JDBC with Isolation Level TRANSACTION_READ_UNCOMMITTED and a connection per process.

UPDATE:

The schema looks as follows:

CREATE TABLE rev
(
  id integer NOT NULL,
  source text,
  date timestamp with time zone,
  title text,
  summary text,
  md5sum text,
  author text,
  content text,
  CONSTRAINT rev_id_pk PRIMARY KEY (id),
  CONSTRAINT md5sum_un UNIQUE (md5sum)
)

CREATE TABLE resp
(
  id integer NOT NULL,
  source text,
  date timestamp with time zone,
  title text,
  summary text,
  md5sum text,
  author text,
  content text,
  CONSTRAINT resp_id_pk PRIMARY KEY (id),
  CONSTRAINT md5sum_un UNIQUE (md5sum)
)

And I have a few indexes on some of the fields.

A sample query looks like:

SELECT * FROM rev LEFT JOIN resp ON rev.id = resp.parent_id WHERE rev.date > ? LIMIT 1000 OFFSET ?

The resp table is much smaller, but it too gets updates and is queried in the joins.

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Could you please tell us the nature of the data being updated and queried. A schema and sample query would help a lot. You mention integrity of data is not very important, which makes me think this is some sort of event logging. Please clarify. –  Ocaj Nires Aug 10 '11 at 13:19
    
I updated my answer. Its no event logging, its a lot of data (articles and alike) that is taken from multiple sources. Each of this "fetching" processes runs as fast as possible. Currently the inserting seems to be the bottleneck. Another client requests this data once a while. –  morja Aug 10 '11 at 13:41
    
An unkown OFFSET could be a problem on large tables, you might be better of using a database CURSOR. The jdbc-connector has support for this. –  Frank Heikens Aug 10 '11 at 13:52
    
Ok, I switched to CURSOR and do some more tests now. –  morja Aug 10 '11 at 14:27
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This results in many failures on both sides, reading and writing.

What kind of failures? Reading and writing on the same table should not be a problem at all in PostgreSQL, MVCC works fine.

Hard to tell you how to fix your problems without any information about the system and what the processes are doing. Could you tell us more about it? And show a database schema?

Right now I use JDBC with Isolation Level TRANSACTION_READ_UNCOMMITTED

READ UNCOMMITTED doesn't exist in PostgreSQL, it's treated like Read Committed:

In PostgreSQL, you can request any of the four standard transaction isolation levels. But internally, there are only two distinct isolation levels, which correspond to the levels Read Committed and Serializable. When you select the level Read Uncommitted you really get Read Committed, and when you select Repeatable Read you really get Serializable, so the actual isolation level might be stricter than what you select.

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The failures are mostly connection timeouts and stream closed exceptions. The database does'nt seem to respond at all for a while. Thank you for the insight on the Isolation Levels! –  morja Aug 10 '11 at 13:32
    
Those failures don't seem to be related to the usage of the database, it's something else. No response from the database sounds like a performance problem, for example not enough I/O to handle all writes. You should check this before changing your code: Your hardware won't be faster when writing to other tables, you still have to write the data. –  Frank Heikens Aug 10 '11 at 13:51
    
Yes I understand that. The writes look ok as long as there is no read at the same time. Thats why I think its related to too many Transactions on a single table. You think thats not the reason? –  morja Aug 10 '11 at 13:54
    
No, many transactions are not a problem at all. And 20 processes will never be close to "many"... INSERT and SELECT can be done concurrent, that's what MVCC is all about! Even UPDATE and DELETE can be done at the same moment, when you don't try to UPDATE or DELETE the same records in different transactions. That might slow down some transactions. –  Frank Heikens Aug 10 '11 at 14:34
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I'm not sure how much a slight delay is for getting readable data is, but you might want to look into Slony Replication. Essentially, you have a master database with a slave database. All of your inserts/writes would be put into your master database, then Slony would replicate those new entries into the slave database (this takes a little bit of time, but nothing monumental. A few minutes, perhaps.). Then you can have your applications read exclusively from the slave database.

If Slony doesn't seem right for you, you can look at some "multi-master" alternatives here. These will let you have multiple machines be writeable, and have all their contents be replicated onto the read-machine.

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Slony looks interesting. Thank you. But does such a replication also help with the simultaneous writing to a table? Does it not only help with the simultanous reads? –  morja Aug 10 '11 at 13:37
    
For the issue with simultaneous writes, you might want multiple slaves - that way you break the writes up across multiple databases to alleviate stress, and then have them replicate to one another for eventual consistency. –  Mike Trpcic Aug 11 '11 at 13:35
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