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For one part of my app I need to authenticate the details of a users SQL account.

The way this is currently done is to append the username and password to the connectionstring and then return a dataset with the users details. This code lives in a try statement and if there an exception is thrown it assumes the user details were incorrect (a very nasty way of doing things!).

The current code is something like this:

  iBindClientServices.Services service = new iBindClientServices.Services(); //nasty com+ service           
  try
  {
  string szConn = "DSN=xxxxx" + ";UID=" + userName + ";PWD=" + password;
  //check username and password
  ADODB.Recordset record = service.GetUserDetail(szConn, ""); 
  }

  catch(Exception ex)
  {
  //login unsuccessfull
  }

Is there an elegant way to do this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about this piece of code

public static bool checkConnection()
{
    SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("mydatasource");
    try
    {
         conn.Open();
         return true;
    }
    catch (Exception ex) { return false; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is slightly better than what is already being done. I was hoping there was some SQL library that had some kind of authenticate method. One problem with this approach is that its going to fail authentication for every exception, even if the user name and password is correct –  woggles Aug 10 '11 at 13:48
    
I think it is more important to check whether you can open a connection to a database with a given connection string and the above pasted code is just doing that and nothing extra. I do not see any other exception that can arise in highway usage scenarios other than wrong connection string being used. Well I am not aware of any API which just verifies the connection string. –  Deepansh Gupta Aug 10 '11 at 13:57
    
I agree that its better. Exceptions could be thrown if there is an infrastructure problem - database or network down etc. but then I guess I have bigger problems! –  woggles Aug 10 '11 at 14:00

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