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I'm writing some code (a Metropolis-Hastings MCMC sampler) that will use a random number generator, and modify an array and potentially other structures based on this.

My initial idea was to use the ST monad, so that I could use ST arrays and the mersenne-random-pure64 package, keeping the PureMT generator as part of the state.

However I want to be able to split off some of the work into separate helper functions (e.g to sample a random integer in a given range, to update the array structure, and potentially more complicated things). To do this, I think I would need to pass the references to the PureMT gen and the array to all the functions, which could quickly become very ugly if I need to store more state.

My instinct is to group all of the state into a single data type that I can access anywhere, as I would using the State monad by defining a new datatype, but I don't know if that is possible with the ST monad, or the right way to go about it.

Are there any nice patterns for doing this sort of thing? I want to keep things as general as possible because I will probably need to add extra state and build more monadic code around the existing parts.

I have tried looking for examples of ST monad code but it does not seem to be covered in Real World Haskell, and the haskell wiki examples are very short and simple.

thanks!

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2 Answers 2

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My instinct is to group all of the state into a single data type that I can access anywhere, as I would using the State monad by defining a new datatype, but I don't know if that is possible with the ST monad, or the right way to go about it.

Are there any nice patterns for doing this sort of thing? I want to keep things as general as possible because I will probably need to add extra state and build more monadic code around the existing parts.

The key point to realize here is that it's completely irrelevant that you're using ST. The ST references themselves are just regular values, which you need access to in a variety of places, but you don't actually want to change them! The mutability occurs in ST, but the STRef values and whatnot are basically read-only. They're names pointing to the mutable data.

Of course, read-only access to an ambient environment is what the Reader monad is for. The ugly passing of references to all the functions is exactly what it's doing for you, but because you're already in ST, you can just bolt it on as a monad transformer. As a simple example, you can do something like this:

newtype STEnv s e a = STEnv (ReaderT e (ST s) a)
    deriving (Functor, Applicative, Monad)

runEnv :: STEnv s e a -> ST s e -> ST s a
runEnv (STEnv r) e = runReaderT r =<< e

readSTEnv :: (e -> STRef s a) -> STEnv s e a
readSTEnv f = STEnv $ lift . readSTRef . f =<< ask

writeSTEnv :: (e -> STRef s a) -> a -> STEnv s e ()
writeSTEnv f x = STEnv $ lift . flip writeSTRef x . f =<< ask

For more generality, you could abstract over the details of the reference types, and make it into a general "environment with mutable references" monad.

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This sounds like a good idea, I forgot that the references aren't actually changing. Thanks for this! I'm also wondering about possibly using the ST monad from within itself to separate independent stateful computations running in a higher level environment that they don't need to access, with their own hidden local state. Would I need to use the ST monad transformer for this, or can you just use let a = runST $ .... inside the ST monad? If you can (without using the transformer) what would happen if you tried to dereference a ref from the enclosing monad (assuming they would be in scope)? –  Tom Aug 10 '11 at 22:06
    
@Tom: There is no transformer for ST--like IO, it's always at the bottom of any stack. Furthermore, any two complete ST computations--that is, stuff happening inside a call to runST--are completely isolated from each other's state, and any attempt to mix them will give a type error. You can pass opaque values around, just as you could pass IORefs around inside ST, but you can't use them any more than you could use the IORefs, either. You can use runST just like usual, though; the result of that is a pure value, as always. –  C. A. McCann Aug 10 '11 at 23:20
    
@Tom: Also, if you use a ReaderT as in my example, you could probably implement several kinds of bracketing operations without too much trouble--cloning the current environment to run in a separate, inner ST, running something in the same ST with a different environment, &c. –  C. A. McCann Aug 10 '11 at 23:26
    
thanks, although I think this is a transformer for ST - hackage.haskell.org/packages/archive/STMonadTrans/0.2/doc/html/… but I don't think it is necessary for what I had in mind. –  Tom Aug 11 '11 at 10:15
    
@Tom: Well, note that the transformer there messes with ST's internals in a way that breaks if combined with particular other monads, so I'm not sure it really counts. But anyway, yes, for what you're doing simple is probably best. A transformer would only be useful if you needed to apply another monad's control structures to the internal state token, which is fraught with peril and not terribly useful anyhow. –  C. A. McCann Aug 11 '11 at 13:53

You can use the ST monad just like the IO monad, bearing in mind that you only get arrays and refs and no other IO goodies. Just like IO, you can layer a StateT over it if you want to thread some state transparently through your computation.

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Oh I didn't think of that, I think that will solve my problems. –  Tom Aug 10 '11 at 15:23

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