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I have 3 classes A, B, and C. The only thing they have in common is a getName() function, nothing else.

I have an array of type Class which stores the above classes.

Class[] classes = {A.class,B.class,C.class};

I then have a List that contains objects of types A, B, and C

List<?> list = new ArrayList<?>();
list.add(new A());
list.add(new B());
list.add(new C());

I want to access the objects in the list through a loop. I also want to access methods of the objects A, B, and C. So, I try casting them using the classes array.

for(int i = 0; i < classes.length;i++)
{
    classes[i].cast(list.get(i)).getName(); //A,B,and C have method getName() in common
}

This gives me a compiler error: "The method getName() is not defined for type Object

Is there a way for the compiler to ignore this type of casting until runtime (I am sure it will work at runtime)? Or is there another solution that does what I expect(I am looking for a solution that does not involves changing the code of classes A, B, and C)

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1  
Are you sure the compiler lets you call add on a List<?>? It shouldn't be possible (since there's no way to make sure that the object is of the right type for the list). –  Andrzej Doyle Aug 10 '11 at 14:48
    
@Andrzej Doyle - List<?> is shorthand for List<? extends Object>. So adding anything inheriting from Object is valid –  Paul Bellora Aug 10 '11 at 15:46
1  
@Kublai - the first part is true, the second isn't. Generics are not covariant; the wildcard means "this is a list of some specific type which extends Object", so the compiler cannot be sure that the object you're inserting has a compatible type. (It's right too; consider List<Integer> iList = new ArrayList<Integer>(); List<?> list = iList; list.add("string"); If the call to add were allowed, iList now contains a String, leading to a ClassCastException at runtime despite the supposed type-safety of generics.) –  Andrzej Doyle Aug 10 '11 at 16:41
    
@Andrzej Doyle - You're right to point that out, I see what you're saying now. Actually, another part of his example that wouldn't compile is new ArrayList<?>(). –  Paul Bellora Aug 10 '11 at 17:09
    
My code might not actually compile, I just wanted to focus on the idea. Thanks for pointing it out though. –  Sujen Aug 10 '11 at 17:31
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8 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An answer is to use the instanceof operator. This seems reasonable if the classes in the List are known. Here is some code:

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        A aObject;
        B bObject;
        C cObject;
        List list = new ArrayList();

        list.add(new A());
        list.add(new B());
        list.add(new C());
        list.add(new String());

        for (Object current : list)
        {
            if (current instanceof A)
            {
                aObject = (A)current;
                System.out.println(aObject.getName());
            }
            else if (current instanceof B)
            {
                bObject = (B)current;
                System.out.println(bObject.getName());
            }
            else if (current instanceof C)
            {
                cObject = (C)current;
                System.out.println(cObject.getName());
            }
            else
            {
                System.out.print("Unexpected class: ");
                System.out.println(current.getClass());
            }
        }
    }

Here is a (slightly) more verbose (then in other answers) example of doing this using Reflection. This seems reasonable if the classes in the List are not known or there are many of them. The commented out line below uses the Apache Commons Lang class MethodUtils.

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        List list = new ArrayList();
        Method getNameMethod;

        list.add(new A());
        list.add(new B());
        list.add(new C());
        list.add(new String());

        for (Object current : list)
        {
//          getNameMethod = MethodUtils.getAccessibleMethod(current.getClass(), "getName", (Class[])null);
            try
            {
                getNameMethod = current.getClass().getMethod("getName");
            }
            catch (SecurityException exception1)
            {
                getNameMethod = null;
            }
            catch (NoSuchMethodException exception1)
            {
                getNameMethod = null;
            }

            if (getNameMethod != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    System.out.println(getNameMethod.invoke(current, (Object[])null));
                }
                catch (IllegalArgumentException exception)
                {
                    // TODO Implement this catch block.
                }
                catch (IllegalAccessException exception)
                {
                    // TODO Implement this catch block.
                }
                catch (InvocationTargetException exception)
                {
                    // TODO Implement this catch block.
                }
            }
            else
            {
                System.out.print("Unexpected class: ");
                System.out.println(current.getClass());
            }
        }
    }

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+1 this is a better approach than reflection where the number of these classes is small. –  Paul Bellora Aug 10 '11 at 15:11
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You should implement an interface with the method getName(), let's call it Nameable:

public interface Nameable {

    public String getName();
}

Then have these three classes A B and C implement Nameable. This will allow you to declare your list as a List<Nameable> and no casting will be necessary to call this method when accessing its elements.

EDIT: Okay, since you can't modify these classes you could do something similar to what @JB Nizet suggests. However, don't dynamically look up the method within the loop, as this is expensive. Statically look up these methods once for each class, and keep them in a Map where the key is the Class:

private static final Map<Class<?>, Method> getNameMap = new HashMap<Class<?>, Method>();
static {
    try {
        getNameMap.put(A.class, A.class.getMethod("getName"));
        getNameMap.put(B.class, B.class.getMethod("getName"));
        getNameMap.put(C.class, B.class.getMethod("getName"));
    }
    catch (NoSuchMethodException nsme) {
        //handle method not being found
    }
}

Then look up the method from within the loop:

for (Object obj : list) {
    try {
        Class<?> objClass = obj.getClass();
        Object returned = getNameMap.get(objClass).invoke(obj);
        String name = (String)returned; //I'm just assuming these methods return a String that you want to use for something
    }
    catch (IllegalAccessException iae) {
        //handle method not being accessable
    }
    catch (InvocationTargetException ite) {
        Throwable cause = ite.getCause();
        //handle cause exception
    }
}
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Yes I know that is a solution, however I am looking for one that does not involve changing the code of classes A, B, and C. I am not sure if it is possible though. –  Sujen Aug 10 '11 at 14:40
    
also check @DwB's answer for a solution that uses instanceof instead of reflection –  Paul Bellora Aug 10 '11 at 15:08
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You don't need to cast: an A instance is an A instance, and casting won't change its type. Since you don't know at compile-time what the type of the element is, casting doesn't help you.

What you must do is call the getName method by reflection:

Class<?> clazz = list.get(i).getClass();
Method m = clazz.getMethod("getName");
m.invoke(list.get(i));
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Consider using reflection to call "getName()".

Otherwise, if the number of classes is limited and known at compile time you can use something like

if (classes[i] == A.class)  { ((A) list.get(i)).getName() }
else ...
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Because there is no way for the compiler to check if Objects in that List have a corresponding getName() method. What if there was an Object of class D in that list? The solution would be to define an interface with a method getName()

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class InterfaceExample {

interface I {
    String getName();
}

static class A implements I{
    ...
}

static class B implements I {
    ...
}

static class C implements I {
    ...
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<I> list = new ArrayList<I>();
    list.add(new A());
    list.add(new B());
    list.add(new C());
    for(I i : list) {
        i.getName();
    }
  }
}
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You should use interfaces for this purpose, to make

interface Nameable { public String getName() }

class A implements Nameable { ... }
class B implements Nameable { ... }
...

This clearly goes against your restriction (to not change A, B, C code) but it's the right way to do it.

If you really want to keep A,B,C source untouched you could use middle objects:

interface Nameable { public String getName() }
class AC extends A implements Nameable { ... }
class BC extends B implements Nameable { ... }
class CC extends C implements Nameable { ... }

or finally you could use also composition

class AC implements Nameable
{
   A instance;
   public String getName()
   {
     return instance.getName();
   }
}

but I personally stick to first solution, which is the correct OO way to do it.

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If you don't want to (or can't) change the definition of classes A, B and C at all, then the most likely option you have available is to invoke the method via reflection.

At present, Java's static typing cannot guarantee that the elements inside the list have a getName() method - because all it can guarantee is that they're instances of java.lang.Object.

Even your cast doesn't help this, because you suffer from the exact same problem with your classes array. Note that Class<E> is actually generic, with a type parameter corresponding to the actual class to be cast into. Since the elements of the array just have the raw type Class (roughly equivalent to Class<? extends Object>), the result of the classes[i].cast() call is, yet again, an instance of java.lang.Object. And so you can't call getName on it.


Unless there is some common superinterface of these three classes that defines getName(), you will not be able to satisfy the compiler that it's a valid method to call on them in this style.

One very basic way around this would just be to handle each class differently - use instanceof checks and then explicitly cast to A, B or C. This would make the compiler happy, and has some amoutn of static type-checking (e.g. if the method was renamed in A your code would stop compiling), but would triple the amount of code you'd have to write, and runs the risk of you skipping a new class D later on.

Another option is reflection - get hold of the getName method directly from the objects at runtime and invoke it:

for(int i = 0; i < list.length;i++)
{
    final Object obj = list.get(i);
    final Method m = obj.getClass.getMethod("getName"); //A,B,and C have method getName() in common
    m.invoke(obj);

    // Exception-handling code omitted
}

This "just works", but it's poor for performance, and also means that any changes to your classes won't be picked up until you get the NoSuchMethodException at runtime.

The best solution really is to introduce the interface and change the classes.

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Using reflection, a utility method can be created to call the getName() method on any object which defines it appropriately (I guessed no arguments, and returning a String):

static String executeGetName(Object o) throws SecurityException,
        NoSuchMethodException, IllegalArgumentException,
        IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException {
    Method method = o.getClass().getMethod("getName");
    return (String) method.invoke(o);
}
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