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class Bird {
public:
   Bird() {
     .....
     .....
    }    
};

void fun() {
    static Bird obj;
}

When compiler compiles the statement static Bird obj It does 2 thing. First is memory allocation for object obj. Second is initialization of obj by calling constructor. My question is if initialization part happens in compile time, how all the statement inside constructor will be executed at compile time

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4 Answers 4

When compiler compiles the statement static Bird obj It does 2 thing. First is memory allocation for object obj. Second is initialization of obj by calling constructor.

No. The memory is already allocated at compile time (before the program gets executed). It's just that initialization happens when the execution touches the static Bird obj; statement. This is called lazy initialization.

Also, note that, in case if Bird() constructor throws an exception, then the initialization will not be finished. So again when the fun() is called, obj is again tries to get initialized. It happens until the obj initializes successfully. After that, that line will not be executed any more.

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static initialization does not happen at compile time. It happens at run-time, but before main() is invoked.

The order in which static initialization spread across compilation units is not defined. Hence, if you really need static variables, the recommended way is to put all of them on a single static_constructors.cpp, and as a extra benefit, they'll be easier to find

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It happens at run-time, but before main() is invoked. Is this correct ? –  iammilind Aug 10 '11 at 15:17
    
@iammilind: the OP is referring to a static variable at function scope, though, so you do know when it's getting initialized, namely at the first invocation of the function. –  Kerrek SB Aug 10 '11 at 15:20
    
@Kerrek, so how static initialization of obj can happen before main(). Allocation happens before main() not the initialization. –  iammilind Aug 10 '11 at 15:26
1  
Except that here, the static variable has local scope. It will be initialized the first time the normal program flow encounters the statement (maybe never). –  James Kanze Aug 10 '11 at 15:26
    
Allocation happens at load-time, indeed, both for functions-scope statics and for global statics. Initialization for functions-scope statics happens at first invocation, but initalization for global statics happens before main(), in no specified order. –  Kerrek SB Aug 10 '11 at 15:27

At compile time, the compiler will set aside a chunk of memory in a special static object area which is part of the program space. That memory will be uninitialized.

Inside the function, the compiler will put an invisible "if" statement which detects that the static object statement is being executed for the first time. If it is the first time, the constructor for the object will be called.

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In that situation, static has a different meaning. It means that obj will be initialized only once, at the first time fun() is called and obj will remaing valid between calls to fun().

Think of it as a global variable, but only the function fun() can see it :P

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