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I'm trying to move some of my queries from the controller to the model but I'm having trouble making it as clean as I'd like. Here are the models I'm working with:

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :account

    def self.recent_posts(account=nil)
        if account.nil? || account.tags.nil?
            results = where(:published => true).order('created_at DESC').limit(5)
        else
            results = tagged_with(account.tags).where(:published => true).order('created_at DESC').limit(5)
        end
    end
end

class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_many :posts
end

Then in the controller I'm calling it like posts = account.posts.recent_posts(account).

However, it seems to me that there should be some way to access account.tags without having to pass in the account instance to the account.posts.recent_posts class method. Is there, or am I just approaching this the wrong way? Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

First pass to clean it up would be something like

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :account

    scope :sane_defaults, where(:published => true).order('created_at DESC').limit(5)
    scope :with_account, lambda {|account|
      if account.try(:tags)
        tagged_with(account.tags)
      end
    }
end

and then to call Post.with_account(account).sane_defaults

It's frustrating that tagged_with doesn't play nice with other scopes. Most scopes return an active relation object you can chain off of, but apparently when passed nil or even a empty array tagged_with returns a hash. That's impolite and should be fixed.

In general in Ruby one doesn't check for nil because nil is a falsey value and checking for object existence is shorter and evaluates truthy.
Also you can assign the result of an if expression,. so it would be more idomatic to say

    results = if account && account.tags
      tagged_with(account.tags).where(:published => true).order('created_at DESC').limit(5)
    else
      where(:published => true).order('created_at DESC').limit(5)
    end

There's a fair amount of debate about the try method, but if you don't have an opinion on whether it's good or bad practice, use it until you develop one. It will allow you to shorten

if account && account.tags

to

if account.try(:tags)

It would be interesting to see the entirety of your controller method.

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Class methods have no knowledge of particular instances unless you pass one in as a reference. They are entirely different contexts, after all. It's easy to make an instance method that passes up to the class method as required:

def recent_posts
  self.class.recent_posts(self)
end

That might look a little awkward, but it's a pattern that appears often when you have a class-level utility method that needs a bit of scope information.

You might also want to express your test as this:

if (!account || !account.tags?)
  # ...
end

Generally you don't need to test for nil? specifically unless you're concerned the value might be false, an uncommon case in situations like this. There's also a method introduced for text-fields that can test if the value is defined and non-blank at the same time. account.tags? is equivalent to account.tags.present? which is the inverse of account.tags.blank?

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It makes sense to use the instance method first and call the class method. The only problem is that I can't figure out how to call an instance method in a controller such as account.posts.instance_method. I'm guessing it's because there are no instances of the Post model at that point. –  Andrew Anderson Aug 10 '11 at 20:25
    
You'll need to operate on one or more of the posts at a time. For instance: account.posts.collect(&:recent_posts).flatten would work, though it could be made significantly more efficient. –  tadman Aug 11 '11 at 15:08

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