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I'm sure some variation of this question has been asked before but all other, similar questions on SO seem to be much more complex, involving passing arrays and other forms of data. My scenario is much simpler so I hope there is a simple/elegant solution.

Is there a way that I can create an anonymous function, or pass a line of code as a function pointer to another function?

In my case, I have a series of diverse operations. Before and after each line of code, there are tasks I want to accomplish, that never change. Instead of duplicating the beginning code and ending code, I'd like to write a function that takes a function pointer as a parameter and executes all of the code in the necessary order.

My problem is that it's not worth defining 30 functions for each operation since they are each one line of code. If I can't create an anonymous function, is there a way that I can simplify my C code?

If my request isn't entirely clear. Here's a bit of pseudo-code for clarification. My code is much more meaningful than this but the code below gets the point accross.

void Tests()
{
  //Step #1
  printf("This is the beginning, always constant.");
  something_unique = a_var * 42;  //This is the line I'd like to pass as an anon-function.
  printf("End code, never changes");
  a_var++;

  //Step #2
  printf("This is the beginning, always constant.");
  a_diff_var = "arbitrary";  //This is the line I'd like to pass as an anon-function.
  printf("End code, never changes");
  a_var++;

  ...
  ...

  //Step #30
  printf("This is the beginning, always constant.");
  var_30 = "Yup, still executing the same code around a different operation.  Would be nice to refactor...";  //This is the line I'd like to pass as an anon-function.
  printf("End code, never changes");
  a_var++;
}
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1  
I've removed the C++ tag, as this question seems entirely focussed on C. –  Joe Gauterin Aug 10 '11 at 16:04
    
Thanks Joe. I wasn't sure if it applied to both. Some times you can ask a question for one purpose, but the next guy with the same, similar question can use your same results. Thus, I added the C++ tag since C code is (ahem should be) entirely compatible with C++. –  RLH Aug 10 '11 at 16:13
    
You could use clang with block extensions, but this is very unportable. –  user142019 Aug 10 '11 at 16:17
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6 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Not in the traditional sense of anonymous functions, but you can macro it:

#define do_something(blah) {\
    printf("This is the beginning, always constant.");\
    blah;\
    printf("End code, never changes");\
    a_var++;\
}

Then it becomes

do_something(something_unique = a_var * 42)
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3  
This works but there are limits on the statement allowed inside; for example it can't include any commas. You might split it into two macros without parameters, one before the varying statement and one after. –  Mark Ransom Aug 10 '11 at 16:09
    
Ah, I didn't think about the macro approach. I think this is my answer. @Mark, why can't I use commas? (In a brief nutshell.) –  RLH Aug 10 '11 at 16:16
    
@RLH, because the macro preprocessor then assumes you're supplying two parameters to a macro which takes only one. –  Mark Ransom Aug 10 '11 at 16:20
    
@Mark, I see what you mean. That's not the case for my scenario. Thanks guys. This is the answer I needed. –  RLH Aug 10 '11 at 16:22
    
@RLH FYI: the macro technique also applies in C++ –  Foo Bah Aug 10 '11 at 17:13
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No, you cannot. Anonymous functions are only available in functional languages (and languages with functional subsets), and as we all know, c is dysfunctional ;^)

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3  
And sometimes nonfunctional. –  Oli Charlesworth Aug 10 '11 at 16:05
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In C and pre-0x C++, no.

In C++0x, yes, using lambda functions.

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Even a lambda function won't be able to modify arbitrary variables in the caller's environment. –  Mark Ransom Aug 10 '11 at 16:10
    
@Mark: they can, that's what capture-by-reference is for. Just make sure the lifetime of the lambda doesn't exceed the lifetime of the variable it references. –  Steve Jessop Aug 10 '11 at 17:07
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The best way to simplify your code would probably to put a for loop around a switch statement.

int a_var;
for ( a_var = 0; a_var <= 30; a_var++ )
{
    starteroperations();
    switch (a_var)
    {
         case 0:
             operation0(); break;
         case ...:
             operationx(); break;
         case 30:
             ...
    }
    closingoperations();
 }
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If you can use Clang, you can take advantage of blocks. To learn blocks, you can use Apple's documentation, Clang's block language specification and implementation notes, and Apple's proposal to the ISO C working group to add blocks to the standard C language, as well as a ton of blog posts.

Using blocks, you could write:

/* Block variables are declared like function pointers
 * but use ^ ("block pointer") instead of * ("normal pointer"). */
void (^before)(void) = void ^(void) { puts("before"); };

/* Blocks infer the return type, so you don't need to declare it
 * in the block definition. */
void (^after)(void) = ^(void) { puts("after"); };

/* The default arguments are assumed to be void, so you could even
 * just define after as
 *
 *     ^{ puts("after"); };
 */

before();
foo = bar + baz*kablooie;
after();

This example gives the anonymous blocks names by assigning to a block variable. You can also define and call a block directly:

   ^{ puts("!"); } ();
/*|  definition   | invocation of anonymous function |*/

This also makes defining "struct-objects" (OOP in C using structs) very simple.

Both Clang and GCC support inner/nested functions as an extension to standard C. This would let you define the function immediately before taking its address, which might be an alternative if your control flow structure allows it: inner function pointers cannot be allowed to escape from their immediate scope. As the docs say:

If you try to call the nested function through its address after the containing function has exited, all hell will break loose. If you try to call it after a containing scope level has exited, and if it refers to some of the variables that are no longer in scope, you may be lucky, but it's not wise to take the risk. If, however, the nested function does not refer to anything that has gone out of scope, you should be safe.

Using nested functions, you could write:

 /* Nested functions are defined just like normal functions.
  * The difference is that they are not defined at "file scope"
  * but instead are defined inside another function. */
 void before(void) { puts("before"); };
 void after(void) { puts("after"); };

 before();
 foo = bar + baz*kablooie;
 after();
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Either you go the case way suggested by @dcpomero, or you do the following:

typedef void job(int);
job test1; void test1(int a_var) { something_unique = a_var * 42; }
job test2; void test2(int a_var) { a_diff_var = "arbitrary"; }
job test3; void test3(int a_var) { var_30 = "Yup, still executing the same code around a different operation.  Would be nice to refactor..."; }

job * tests[] = { test1, test2, test3, testn };

void Tests()
{
    int i;
    for (i=0; i < sizeof tests/sizeof tests[0]; i++) {
        printf("This is the beginning, always constant.");
        tests[i](a_var);
        printf("End code, never changes");
        a_var++;
    }
}
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