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<style>
      .btn{
           display: inline-block;
           padding: 15px 10px;
           background: gray;
       }
      .btn:hover{
             background:lightgray;
             color:red;
      }
</style>

<div class="btn"> 
   text
</div>

works nicely. However if we have that:

<div class="btn"> 
  <a href="#">text</a>
</div>

it wouldn't work exactly as the first one. The anchor's text wouldn't be affected. Okay what if we add to the CSS:

.btn a:hover{
    background:lightgray;
   color:red;
 }

That will work, but only if you hover exactly on the anchor, but still hover on the div rectangle wouldn't affect the anchor's text.

How can I tweak that without any javascript, so both rectangles acted identically?

http://jsfiddle.net/vaNJD/

UPD: adding !important keyword wouldn't help

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because all web browsers set a default color (and text-decoration) for a elements, you need a more specific selector to override the default. Try this instead:

.btn:hover, .btn:hover a {
    background:lightgray;
    color:red;
}

If you really want the two boxes to be identical, you would also need to override the un-hovered button as well:

.btn a {
    color: black;
    text-decoration: none;
}

It may also be worth pointing out that IE6 only supports the :hover pseudo-class on a elements. You may want to work around this by setting the a to display: block and adding the background color there.

You can accomplish the same effect by getting rid of the container and applying the .btn class directly to the a element. See the third box in this updated fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/mlms13/vaNJD/5/

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He would have to reset the brower's default color/text-decoration settings as well. .btn a { text-decoration:none; color:black; } –  Phil Aug 10 '11 at 16:19
    
Why the downvote (or the undo of an upvote, as it were)? –  Michael Martin-Smucker Aug 10 '11 at 16:26
    
I didn't downvote you, but it isn't the answer. –  Phil Aug 10 '11 at 16:28
    
I read this question as being more about :hover than about styling links in general, but your point is valid, so I'll update my answer. –  Michael Martin-Smucker Aug 10 '11 at 16:30
     .btn:hover{
             background:lightgray;
             color:red;
      }
      .btn:hover a{
        color: red;
      }
share|improve this answer
    
+1, because <a> doesn't inherit color styling from it's parents –  MikeM Aug 10 '11 at 16:17
    
@mdmullinax, color is inherited (w3.org/TR/CSS2/propidx.html). The issue is specificity, because the browser sets a default color for a elements. –  Michael Martin-Smucker Aug 10 '11 at 16:26
    
agreed, I separated because it wasn't clear that he wanted the background set. –  Tim Hoolihan Aug 10 '11 at 16:28
    
@Michael color is inherited from more generic anchor styling rules, but <a> does not inherit color information from parent elements such as <p>, <div>, or <body> –  MikeM Aug 10 '11 at 16:31
    
It doesn't "inherit" the color because there's already a more specific color rule set by the browser. If the browser would also set a default color for p, paragraphs also wouldn't inherit their parent's color. This is because of specificity, not because inheritance doesn't exist. –  Michael Martin-Smucker Aug 10 '11 at 16:38

Change to:

.btn:hover,
.btn:hover a{
    background:lightgray;
    color:red;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/vaNJD/4/

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Like this?

.btn:hover a{
    color:red;   
}
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I found one way in which you should set height for div tag and use it again for anchor tag and set anchor's display properties as block for example

<style>
.divest
{
height:120px;
}
.divest a
{
display:block;
height:120px;
}
</style>
<div class="divest"><a href="#">here is hyperlink text</a></div>
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