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Is the a way to generate an arbitrary number of rows that can be used in a join similar to the oracle syntax:

SELECT LEVEL FROM DUAL CONNECT BY LEVEL<=10
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Could you please post the query you meant to write? –  Manrico Corazzi Mar 31 '09 at 16:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Hate to say this, but MySQL is the only RDBMS of the big four that doesn't have this feature.

In Oracle:

SELECT  *
FROM    dual
CONNECT BY
        level < n

In MS SQL (up to 100 rows):

WITH hier(row) AS
        (
        SELECT  1
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  row + 1
        FROM    hier
        WHERE   row < n
        )
SELECT  *
FROM    hier

In PostgreSQL:

SELECT  *
FROM    generate_series (1, n)

In MySQL, nothing.

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3  
Reg MySQL: Hope that fills the gap a little bit: use-the-index-luke.com/blog/2011-07-30/… –  Markus Winand Sep 20 '11 at 9:06

In MySql, it is my understand that you can get more than one row with a SELECT with no table (or DUAL).

Therefore, to get multiple rows, you do need a real or temporary table with at least the required number of rows.

However, you do not need to build a temporary table as you can use ANY existing table which has at least the number of rows required. So, if you have a table with at least the required number of rows, use:

SELECT  @curRow := @curRow + 1 AS row_number
FROM    sometable 
JOIN    (SELECT @curRow := 0) r
WHERE   @curRow<100;

Just replace "sometable" with the name of any table of yours with at least the required number of rows.

PS: The "r" is a table "alias": I could have used "AS r". Any subquery in a FROM or JOIN clause creates a "derived table" which, as with all tables, must have a name or alias. (See MySql manual: 13.2.9.8. Subqueries in the FROM Clause)

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Have you considered a LEFT OUTER JOIN?

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1  
Yes, the problem is I need something to do the JOIN against –  GameFreak Mar 31 '09 at 15:08

I don't know if this helps but you can number the rows from each select statement with sth. like:

SET @NUM = 0;

SELECT @NUM:=@NUM+1 rowNumber, * FROM ...

And later join them on this one. At large databases this can be very slow.

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If I'm understanding you, you want a list of consequtive numbers?

Just make the list:

create table artificial_range (id int not null primary key auto_increment, idn int);
insert into artificial_range (idn) values (0); --first row
insert into artificial_range(idn) select idn from artificial_range; --2nd
insert into artificial_range(idn) select idn from artificial_range; -- now 4 rows
insert into artificial_range(idn) select idn from artificial_range; --8
insert into artificial_range(idn) select idn from artificial_range; --16
insert into artificial_range(idn) select idn from artificial_range; --32
insert into artificial_range(idn) select idn from artificial_range; --64
insert into artificial_range(idn) select idn from artificial_range; --128

... etc, until you have, say, 1024.

update artificial_range set idn = id - 1 ;

-- now you have a series staring at 1 (id) and a series starting at 0

Now join to it, or join to transformations of it:

    create view days_this_century as 
select date_add('2000-01-01', interval a.idn day) as cdate 
from artificial_range;
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that was exactly what I was hoping to avoid. –  GameFreak Apr 2 '09 at 23:09

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