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What is the type of the exception object in the following thrown:

Question1> range_error r("error"); throw r;

Answer1> an object of range_error

Question2> exception *p = &r; throw *p;

Answer2> a sliced object of exception

Question3> exception *p = &r; throw p;

Answer3> a pointer pointing to range_error is thrown. The capture-handling can access the range_error member functions through dynamic binding.

Do I get these question right?

// Updated and Compiled and Run on VS2010

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class ExClassA
{
public:
    virtual void PrintMe() const
    {
        cout << "ExClassA" << endl;
    }
};

class ExClassB : public ExClassA
{
public:
    virtual void PrintMe() const
    {
        cout << "ExClassB" << endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{   
    ExClassB exClassB;
    ExClassA *p = &exClassB;

    try
    {
        throw *p;
    }
    catch (const ExClassA& e)
    {
        e.PrintMe();        
    }

    try
    {
        throw p;
    }
    catch (const ExClassA* e)
    {
        e->PrintMe();
    }
}

The first try-catch of above program prints "ExClassA"

The second try-catch of above program prints "ExClassB"

share|improve this question
    
Reference: Lippman 17.1. –  q0987 Aug 10 '11 at 16:51
1  
It depends what you have in mind when you say "new". –  Kerrek SB Aug 10 '11 at 16:52
    
@Kerrek, I have thought about that 'new' may introduce confusion and I have removed it from the OP. –  q0987 Aug 10 '11 at 16:56
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think you are right in all three. The type of the thrown object (IIRC) is the static type of the object being thrown. I would have to dig into the standard for a while to find the exact quotes, but a simple example seems to confirm this:

struct base {};
struct derived : base {};
void t() {
    derived d;
    base * b = &d;
    throw *b;
}
int main() {
    try {
        t();
    } catch ( derived const & ) {
        std::cout << "derived" << std::endl;
    } catch ( base const & ) {
        std::cout << "base" << std::endl;
    }
}

If the dynamic type of the object being thrown was used, then *b would have type derived and the first catch would succeed, but empirically the second catch is executed (g++).

In the last case, the object thrown is a pointer to exception that refers to a range_error object. The slight difference is again what can be caught, the compiler will not catch in a catch (range_error*) block. The answer is correct, but I would have specified the type of the pointer, as much as the type of the pointee. (The type of the pointer is somehow implicit in the answer)

share|improve this answer
    
The relevant standardese is in §15.1/3. –  ildjarn Aug 10 '11 at 16:59
    
@David, is it true that default modifier of struct inheritance is PUBLIC? –  q0987 Aug 10 '11 at 17:48
    
@q0987 : That's true, yes. –  ildjarn Aug 10 '11 at 18:52
    
@q0987: The only difference between a class and a struct is that the default access specifier for class is private, while for struct is public. That is for both inheritance and member access. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 10 '11 at 21:26
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Throwing an object always results in the thrown object being a copy of the object you threw, based on the static type of that object. Thus your first two answers are correct.

The third one is a little more complicated. If you catch(range_error*) you won't catch the exception because the types don't match. If you catch(exception*) you won't be able to access members of range_error in the caught pointer; you can dynamic_cast that pointer back to a range_error pointer though.

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7  
Also, throwing pointers to local variables is bad. RAII will cleanup that var and the pointer will be DEAD –  Bob Fincheimer Aug 10 '11 at 17:05
    
@Bob, good point hadn't thought about that. Is a caught exception a local variable in the usual sense, or is it special somehow? –  Mark Ransom Aug 10 '11 at 17:08
    
This only arises with throwing pointers, you just have to make sure the pointer is to something valid. When you throw something by value (not a pointer) than it will copy it to wherever it goes. So a caught exception is a local variable which is a copy of the thrown exception. –  Bob Fincheimer Aug 10 '11 at 17:10
    
@Mark, can you check my update2 where the second try-catch prints what I expected but NOT what you said. –  q0987 Aug 10 '11 at 17:45
    
@q0987, you're calling a virtual function on a ClassA pointer, so it works the same as any other polymorphic pointer. What I meant in my answer is that you couldn't access any non-virtual functions or data members of ClassB in the object. –  Mark Ransom Aug 10 '11 at 18:56
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All three answers are correct. Just note that you'll have to catch a pointer type in the third case.

The usual way to throw an exception is:

throw range_error("error");

At the throw site, you normally know the exact type of exception you want to throw. About the only exception I can think of is when the exception was passed in as an argument, e.g.:

void f( std::exception const& whatToDoInCaseOfError )
{
    //  ...
    throw whatToDoInCaseOfError;  //  slices
}

It's not a frequence case, but if you want to support it, you'll need a separate exception hierarchy of your own, with a virtual raise function:

class MyExceptions
{
public:
    virtual ~MyExceptions() {}
    virtual void raise() const = 0;
};

template<typename ExceptionType>
class ConcreteException : public ExceptionType, public MyExceptions
{
public:
    virtual void raise() const
    {
        throw *this;
    }
};

The client code then wraps the exception he wants to be thrown in a ConcreteException, and you call the raise function on it, rather than invoke throw directly.

share|improve this answer
    
we can simply replace the code from "throw whatToDoInCaseOfError;" to "throw" to avoid the slice issue. If I remember it right, rethrow in this way doesn't introduce slice issue. –  q0987 Aug 10 '11 at 17:50
1  
@q0987 But we can't rethrow unless we're in a catch block somewhere, in which case, the client doesn't have to pass in the exception. –  James Kanze Aug 10 '11 at 17:58
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