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I have this RegEx:

('.+')

It has to match character literals like in C. For example, if I have 'a' b 'a' it should match the a's and the ''s around them.

However, it also matches the b also (it should not), probably because it is, strictly speaking, also between ''s.

Here is a screenshot of how it goes wrong (I use this for syntax highlighting):
screenshot

I'm fairly new to regular expressions. How can I tell the regex not to match this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It is being greedy and matching the first apostrophe and the last one and everything in between.

This should match anything that isn't an apostrophe.

('[^']+')

Another alternative is to try non-greedy matches.

('.+?')
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Thanks, this works. What does "greedy" exactly mean in regular expressions? –  user142019 Aug 10 '11 at 17:14
    
Won't work with '\'', which is a char literal in C (as the question states, it needs to match them).` –  sidyll Aug 10 '11 at 17:15
2  
This page, regular-expressions.info/repeat.html, can explain better than I can explain. Basically, it will match as much as possible when it is greedy. –  gpojd Aug 10 '11 at 17:16
1  
@sidyll perhaps ('([^'\\]|\\.)*') then? It worked. –  user142019 Aug 10 '11 at 17:25

Have you tried a non-greedy version, e.g. ('.+?')?

There are usually two modes of matching (or two sets of quantifiers), maximal (greedy) and minimal (non-greedy). The first will result in the longest possible match, the latter in the shortest. You can read about it (although in perl context) in the Perl Cookbook (Section 6.15).

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Try:

('[^']+')

The ^ means include every character except the ones in the square brackets. This way, it won't match 'a' b 'a' because there's a ' in between, so instead it'll give both instances of 'a'

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2  
The ^ in your example is being used as an anchor. It needs to be inside the brackets to work as you expect. –  gpojd Aug 10 '11 at 17:15
    
My bad, fixed now. –  Thariq Shihipar Aug 10 '11 at 17:20

You need to escape the qutoes:

\'[^\']+\'

Edit: Hmm, we'll I suppose this answer depends on what lang/system you're using.

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