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I have some problem compiling my code. I have the following structure:

#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

typedef double (*FuncType)(int );

class AnotherClass {
   public:
          AnotherClass() {};       
   double funcAnother(int i) {return i*1.0;}
};

class MyClass {
public:
         MyClass(AnotherClass & obj) { obj_ = &obj;};
    void compute(FuncType foo);
    void run();

    protected:
      AnotherClass * obj_;   /*pointer to obj. of another class */   
};

void MyClass::compute(FuncType foo) 
{
    int a=1;
    double b;
    b= foo(a);    
}

void MyClass::run()
{
     compute(obj_->funcAnother);
}

/*
 * 
 */
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    AnotherClass a;
    MyClass b(a);
    b.run();    

    return 0;
}

When I try to compile it, it gives:

main.cpp:39:31: error: no matching function for call to ‘MyClass::compute(<unresolved overloaded function type>)’
main.cpp:30:6: note: candidate is: void MyClass::compute(double (*)(int))

What's wrong here?

p/s/ AnotherClass * obj_; should stay like that because I write some function to the big library and can't change it.

-------------- working version by Benjamin -------

#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;


class AnotherClass {
   public:
          AnotherClass() {};       
   double funcAnother(int i) {return i*1.0;}
};


struct Foo
{

    /*constructor*/
    Foo(AnotherClass & a) : a_(a) {};

    double operator()(int i) const
    {
        return a_.funcAnother(i);
    }          

    AnotherClass & a_;               
};


class MyClass {
public:
         MyClass(AnotherClass & obj) { obj_ = &obj;};

    template<typename FuncType>     
    void compute(FuncType foo);
    void run();

   protected:
      AnotherClass * obj_;   /*pointer to obj. of another class */   
};

template<typename FuncType>
void MyClass::compute(FuncType foo) 
{
    int a=1;
    double b;
    b= foo(a);    
}

void MyClass::run()
{
    Foo f(*obj_);
    compute(f);
}

/*
 * 
 */
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    AnotherClass a;
    MyClass b(a);
    b.run();    

    return 0;
}

Thank you everybody very much for the help!

share|improve this question
2  
Please post a minimal offending example. The error is not caused by the code you show us. –  Alexandre C. Aug 10 '11 at 17:48
1  
Please post real code (cut down to a minimal example), not pseudo-code. –  Kerrek SB Aug 10 '11 at 17:48
1  
Looks like you declared funcAnother as a member function. If you make it a static class function it should work. Of course if it references it won't work and you need a different approach. –  user786653 Aug 10 '11 at 17:50
    
Reproduce the problem in a minimal program, then post the complete real code. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 10 '11 at 17:50
    
there is no member fucntion void run() in the class MyClass. Also the AnotherClass is to be defined(or atleast forward declared) before MyClass –  Aditya Kumar Aug 10 '11 at 17:51
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following function class will match the signature of your FuncType:

struct Foo
{
    AnotherClass & a_;
    Foo(AnotherClass & a) a_(a) {}

    double operator()(int i) const
    {
        return a_.funcAnother(i);
    }
};

Change MyClass::compute to a template, thusly:

template<typename FuncType>
void MyClass::compute(FuncType foo) 
{
    int a=1;
    foo(a);
}

Then you can call run like this:

void MyClass::run()
{
    compute(Foo(*obj_));
}

If your compiler supports lambdas (and there's a good chance it does), then you can forgo the function class and simply define run like this:

void MyClass::run()
{
    auto f = [this](int i) {
        return obj_->funcAnother(i);
    };

    compute(f);
}
share|improve this answer
    
these are functors, if i'm correct? I'll try it now... –  Denis Aug 10 '11 at 18:42
    
It does work, thank you! –  Denis Aug 10 '11 at 18:57
add comment

Since,

funcAnother(int i);

is a member function it passes an implicit this and then the prototype does not match the type of your function pointer.

The typedef for pointer to member function should be:

typedef double (AnotherClass::*funcPtr)(int);

Here is a modified compilable version of your code. Please check the comments inline to understand the changes, Also I left out the other details, you can add that up.

share|improve this answer
    
so how should I modify my pointer so it is with accordance to the function I want to call? –  Denis Aug 10 '11 at 17:52
    
This is probably not the error (but this is an error with the provided code nonetheless). The error comes from trying to assign an overloaded function name to a function pointer. –  Alexandre C. Aug 10 '11 at 17:52
1  
@Denis: Updated the answer. You need to do following: 1. Post the actual sample code, 2. Post complete sample, The update above solves one of the errors seen in your code, It does not solve the error which you posted, That is probably because you have ambiguous overloaded functions inside your class and you are trying to use them. –  Alok Save Aug 10 '11 at 18:00
    
I updated the code. Also tried your solution, but it does not solve the problem, still have 'unresolved overloaded function' error. –  Denis Aug 10 '11 at 18:41
    
@Denis: Updaed the answer, Follow the link to get the compilable version of your code. –  Alok Save Aug 10 '11 at 19:01
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