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Is possible to recover the exact values of argv and argc parameters of a main after the application crashed?

I need to use only the application core-dump and gdb debugger on Linux.

share|improve this question
    
easiest way is to write the values of argc and argv to some file before doing anything else, if you care so much about them – A. K. Aug 10 '11 at 18:12

Yes, if application was compiled with debug info. Open core dump in gdb and find frame containing main function. Then go to this frame and print values of argv and argc. Here is sample gdb session.

[root@localhost ~]# gdb ./a.out core.2020
GNU gdb (GDB) 7.2
Copyright (C) 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.  Type "show copying"
and "show warranty" for details.
This GDB was configured as "i686-pc-linux-gnu".
For bug reporting instructions, please see:
<http://www.gnu.org/software/gdb/bugs/>...
Reading symbols from /root/a.out...done.
[New Thread 2020]

warning: Can't read pathname for load map: Input/output error.
Reading symbols from /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6...(no debugging symbols found)...done.
Loaded symbols for /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6
Reading symbols from /lib/libm.so.6...(no debugging symbols found)...done.
Loaded symbols for /lib/libm.so.6
Reading symbols from /lib/libgcc_s.so.1...(no debugging symbols found)...done.
Loaded symbols for /lib/libgcc_s.so.1
Reading symbols from /lib/libc.so.6...(no debugging symbols found)...done.
Loaded symbols for /lib/libc.so.6
Reading symbols from /lib/ld-linux.so.2...(no debugging symbols found)...done.
Loaded symbols for /lib/ld-linux.so.2
Core was generated by `./a.out'.
Program terminated with signal 6, Aborted.
#0  0x0027b424 in __kernel_vsyscall ()
(gdb) bt
#0  0x0027b424 in __kernel_vsyscall ()
#1  0x00b28b91 in raise () from /lib/libc.so.6
#2  0x00b2a46a in abort () from /lib/libc.so.6
#3  0x007d3397 in __gnu_cxx::__verbose_terminate_handler() () from /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6
#4  0x007d1226 in ?? () from /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6
#5  0x007d1263 in std::terminate() () from /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6
#6  0x007d13a2 in __cxa_throw () from /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6
#7  0x08048940 in main (argv=1, argc=0xbfcf1754) at test.cpp:14
(gdb) f 7
#7  0x08048940 in main (argv=1, argc=0xbfcf1754) at test.cpp:14
14              throw std::runtime_error("123");
(gdb) p argv
$1 = 1
(gdb) p argc
$2 = (char **) 0xbfcf1754
(gdb)
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1  
It is possible to recover argc and argv for non-debug build as well. If that's what OP really wants, I can write it up. – Employed Russian Aug 10 '11 at 22:36
    
@Employed Russian: I wold be interested to know! I have a non-debug core dump and I would like to see argv. – misterbee Jan 28 '12 at 22:05
    
@misterbee Ask that question, and I'll answer it ;-) Note that the answer is architecture-specific, so be sure to say x86_64, or i686, or whatever. – Employed Russian Jan 28 '12 at 22:16
    
@Employed Russian: stackoverflow.com/questions/9049297/… – misterbee Jan 28 '12 at 22:46

Looks like you need to start from the basics..!!

compiler your application code with -g flag, make sure you dont strip it.

Say if I wanted to compile hello.c

gcc -c -g hello.c -o hello.o
gcc hello.o -o hello

now if you dont want to debug

ulimit -c unlimited
./hello

when the application crashes a core file wiil be generated.

To examine the core file

"gdb ./hello core.$$$" this will list you your stack.

you can also choose to debug the image gdb hello

There are a lot of stuffs over the internet about GDB, do go through them.

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Yep, just go up through the backtrace to main and you can do print argc, x/4s *argv or whatever you want. – user786653 Aug 10 '11 at 18:24

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