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I need a function like


int f(int min, int max, int x, int chance)
// where accepted chance values are 0 to 100 and x values are min to max

to return a random integer equal or greater than min, smaller or equal to max with chance% probability of the result to equal x and 100-chance% probability spread uniformly among all other results in the given range.

My solution is to create an array of 100 cells, fill it with random domain-compliant non-x-equal numbers, throw-in chance number of x-equal values and take a value of a random cell. But I believe there is to be a much better solution a better educated developer can suggest. Can you?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
Random r = new Random();
if (r.Next(100) >= chance)
    return x;
var tmp = r.Next(min, max); // take one less than max to "exclude" x
if (tmp >= x)               // shift up one step if larger than or equal to the exceluded value
    return tmp + 1;
return tmp;

Might be an offset by one error somewhere

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@Richard, then max would never be returned and x + 1 would have double chance compared to the rest != x values. –  Albin Sunnanbo Aug 10 '11 at 18:57
    
ah, I understand it now (deleting my comment). You've got what looks to be the best approach. –  Richard Campbell Aug 10 '11 at 19:06
    
@albin-sunnanbo, the solution is cool, very creative, IMHO, but would you be so kind to explain about "an offset by one error" I can't see what do you mean :-( –  Ivan Aug 11 '11 at 20:56
    
@Ivan, I mean I haven't thought everything through, could be something like tmp >= x instead of tmp >= x - 1 or similar. I can't spot any such errors, I just have not thought carefully about every detail. –  Albin Sunnanbo Aug 12 '11 at 4:50

One way you could handle this is to do:

Random random = new Random();

int f(int min, int max, int x, int chance)
{
    if (random.Next(100) < chance) 
    {
        return x;
    } else { 
        int result = random.Next(min, max + 1);
        while (result == x) {
            result = random.Next(min, max + 1);
        }

        return result;
    }
}

Slightly nondeterministic in that you could theoretically get stuck repeating x as your random number, but in practical usage not a problem.

EDIT: If you look at Albin Sunnanbo's approach, however, he manages to avoid repeated random.Next invocations simply by avoiding the maximum value and incrementing if the first random is x or more (thus also excluding x).

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static Random r = new Random();

int f(int min, int max, int x, int chance)
{
    if (r.Next(100) < chance) return x;
    else 
    {
        int a;
        do { a = r.Next(min, max + 1); } while (a == x);
        return a;
    }   
}
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This doesn't work, because you may end up returning x. –  Richard Campbell Aug 10 '11 at 18:48
    
@Richard: By that comment you mean that you can return x in the second return statement, thus incorrectly increasing the probability of returning x. –  aaaa bbbb Aug 10 '11 at 18:55
    
@aaaa bbbb You're right, I mean that you can return x in the second return statement. This would be incorrect; according to the original question, if (100 - chance)% of the time X should not be returned. –  Richard Campbell Aug 10 '11 at 18:57
    
@Richard: fixed. –  Alexandre C. Aug 10 '11 at 19:02
    
@Alexandre C Yes, fixed. Why did you make a a double, though, instead of an int? –  Richard Campbell Aug 10 '11 at 19:04

I think this should work good for you:

public int f(int min, int max, int x, int chance)
{
    if (x < min || x > max)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("x must be inbetween min and max");
    }

    var random = new Random();

    //generate a random number between 1 and 100, if it is less than the value of
    //chance then we will return x
    if (random.Next(1, 100) <= chance)
    {
        return x;
    }

    return random.Next(min, max);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work, because you may end up returning x out of the second random statement, which is incorrect according to the original question. –  Richard Campbell Aug 10 '11 at 18:54
    
@Richard: By that comment you mean that you can return x in the second return statement, thus incorrectly increasing the probability of returning x –  aaaa bbbb Aug 10 '11 at 18:57

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