Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why my compiler(GCC) doesnt implicitly cast from char** to const char**?

Thie following code:

#include <iostream>

void print(const char** thing) {
    std::cout << thing[0] << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    print(argv);
}

Gives the following error:

oi.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, char**)’:
oi.cpp:8:12: error: invalid conversion from ‘char**’ to ‘const char**’ [-fpermissive]
oi.cpp:3:6: error:   initializing argument 1 of ‘void print(const char**)’ [-fpermissive]
share|improve this question
7  
    
There is no such thing as an "implicit cast". A cast is an explicit operator that specifies a conversion. There can also be implicit conversions. ("cast" is the operator, "conversion" is the operation.) –  Keith Thompson Aug 10 '11 at 19:03
    
@Keith: I think that terminology is not a problem. After all, we say "up-cast" and not "up-conversion". Or, at least, I say that. :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 10 '11 at 19:06
1  
@André: it isn't; Foo** and const Foo* differ in the number of levels of indirection. You can convert from Foo* to const Foo*, because that conversion doesn't make it possible to modify a read-only object; you're just taking a pointer to a read-write object and promising not to modify it. –  Keith Thompson Aug 10 '11 at 19:09
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Such a conversion would allow you to put a const char* into your array of char*, which would be unsafe. In print you could do:

thing[0] = "abc";

Now argv[0] would point to a string literal that cannot be modified, while main expects it to be non-const (char*). So for type safety this conversion is not allowed.

share|improve this answer

@Fred Overflow's link to the FAQ is a complete answer. But (sorry Marshall) it's not the most clear explanation. I don't know if mine is more clear, but I hope so.


The thing is, if p is a char* pointer, then it can be used to modify whatever it's pointing at.

And if you could obtain a pointer pp that points to p, but with pp of type char const**, then you could use pp to assign to p the address of a const char.

And with that, you could then use p to modify the const char. Or, you would think you could. But that const char could even be in read-only memory…

In code:

char const        c = 'a';
char*             p = 0;
char const**      pp = &p;               // Not allowed. :-)

*pp = &c;        // p now points to c.
*p = 'b';        // Uh oh.


As a practical solution to your code that does not compile, …

#include <iostream>

void print(const char** thing) {
    std::cout << thing[0] << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    print(argv);    // Dang, doesn't compile!
}

just do …

#include <iostream>

void print( char const* const* thing )
{
    std::cout << thing[0] << std::endl;
}

int main( int argc, char** argv )
{
    print( argv );    // OK. :-)
}

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer

Note, that although

void dosmth(const char** thing);

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  dosmth(argv);

is forbidden, you can and should do

void dosmth(const char* const* thing);

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  dosmth(argv);

Which is probably what you wanted anyway. The point here is that thing now refers to a const char* array which is itself immutable and which referenced values char are themselves immutable. So, for a "look at it, but do not change it" scenario, const char* const* is the type to use.

Note: I used the more common (but in my opinion inferior) standard of trying to write the const modifier as left as possible. Personally, I recommend writing char const* const* instead of const char* const* as it is hugely more concise that way.

share|improve this answer

Because it might allow us to modify a constant value. Read here to understand why: http://c-faq.com/ansi/constmismatch.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.