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Hey all i am new at C# and i am trying to call the function closeComm() like so:

    public void closeComm()
    {
        commIRToy.ClosePort();
        commProj.ClosePort();
        commTV.ClosePort();
        commAV.ClosePort();
    }

    public static void loadAnotherRemote()
    {
        closeComm();
    }

However, that is giving me an error of: An object reference is required for the non-static field, method, or property

When i try it this way:

    public static void closeComm()
    {
        commIRToy.ClosePort();
        commProj.ClosePort();
        commTV.ClosePort();
        commAV.ClosePort();
    }

    public static void loadAnotherRemote()
    {
        closeComm();
    }

I'm able to call the function but all the commIRToy, commProj, commTV and commAV all have an error of An object reference is required for the non-static field, method, or property The same error i got the other way around....

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1  
Must your loadAnotherRemote() method be static? –  BoltClock Aug 10 '11 at 19:17
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Glad to have your questions, but note: 1) There is no such thing as "C Sharp". The language is "C#". 2) You don't need to put things like "C Sharp" in your titles - we have tags for that. –  John Saunders Aug 10 '11 at 19:18
    
Off-topic advice about terminology: In C#, the executable bits of a type are called "methods", not "functions". The general dinstinction between these two terms is that the former (methods) are members of a type, while the latter (functions) can exist just by themselves, ie. outside of a type. Possible exceptions: (1) "delegates". But again, even these aren't called "function pointers", since they're a different thing. (2) lambda expressions ((…) => {…}) and anonymous delegates (delegate (…) {…}); but even these are usually called anonymous methods, never "functions". –  stakx Aug 10 '11 at 19:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You will either need to make your commIRToy, commProj, commTV, and commAV fields static, or remove the static keyword from the loadAnotherRemote method.

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Gotcha. Thanks devdigital! :o) –  StealthRT Aug 10 '11 at 19:22

A nonstatic method operates on a specific instance of the class. When accessing member variables, it accesses the members of the instance it was called from. A static method does not need any specific instance to be called. Since it is not called through an instance, it can't refer to any variables that are instance-specific, only to static variables.

In your example I assume (without having seen all the code) that you could make all methods and properties static to make it work.

That means that you should add the word static in front of the declarations of commIRToy etc:

static PCComm.CommunicationManager commIRToy = new PCComm.CommunicationManager();

This will make it work - however I wouldn't say it's the best design in the long run.

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You are getting the first error because loadAnotherRemote() is static but is trying to call a method that is not static.
You are getting the second error because, while you are now calling a static method, the variables commIrTroy, etc. are instances of the class and not static.
It's difficult to give you an answer though because I'm not sure of the context of these methods.

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Short answer:

Try this:

public static void loadAnotherRemote()
{
    new TypeThatContainsCloseComm(…).closeComm();
}

Longer answer:

First of all, you need to understand static: Whatever is declared static does not belong to any particular instance of a type, but belongs to the type itself. That is, if you have a static method TypeThatContainsCloseComm.closeComm, then you can call it with:

   TypeThatContainsCloseComm.closeComm(…)
// ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
//     name of the type!

However, all methods that are not declared static can only be called on a particular instance, because that's what they belong to:

   var commProj = new TypeThatContainsClosePort();  // <- create a instance here
   commProj.ClosePort();
// ^^^^^^^^
// instance of a type!

Now, back to your original code:

public void closeComm()
{
    commIRToy.ClosePort();
    commProj.ClosePort();
    commTV.ClosePort();
    commAV.ClosePort();
}

public static void loadAnotherRemote()
{
    // this method is static, therefore we are not "within" an object instance
    closeComm();  // ERROR: closeComm is not static, therefore you need
                  // some object instance to call it!
}

… and back to your second attempt:

public static void closeComm()
{
    commIRToy.ClosePort();  // ERROR if commIRToy, commProj, commTV, commAV
    commProj.ClosePort();   //       are not declared static, because we're
    commTV.ClosePort();     //       in a static method and thus "outside" an
    commAV.ClosePort();     //       object instance, yet these fields are
}                           //       declared within one.

public static void loadAnotherRemote()
{
    closeComm();  // this call is fine now, since `closeComm` is static,
                  // no object instance is required to call it.
}
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A static method is executed in the context of the class. You can call classname.StaticMethod() at any time, because the compiler understands it unambiguously.

When you omit static you define a method that is executed in the context of an object (an instance of the class), typically created using new classname();.

Your call to closeComm() can't be compiled, because the compiler does not know what object to execute the method against.

You can call a static method from and instance method, but not the other way around, unless you have an object for context.

If you need to call closeComm() in the context of a specific object (perhaps because you have many instances), the loadAnotherRemote() method needs an object reference.

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C# Specifications:

10.6.2 Static and instance methods

When a method declaration includes a static modifier, that method is said to be a static method. When no static modifier is present, the method is said to be an instance method.

A static method does not operate on a specific instance, and it is a compile-time error to refer to this in a static method.

MSDN:

Static Members

A static method, field, property, or event is callable on a class even when no instance of the class has been created. If any instances of the class are created, they cannot be used to access the static member. Only one copy of static fields and events exists, and static methods and properties can only access static fields and static events. Static members are often used to represent data or calculations that do not change in response to object state; for instance, a math library might contain static methods for calculating sine and cosine.

It seems to me like you are trying to to manage instances with static methods. If so, consider using the singleton pattern if you only need to manage one instance at a time or have static methods manage a static list of instances. If not, that method wouldn't static and thus would be useless unless it does more than just closeComm();.

Sincerely, Maxime

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