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How Come the following gives me an error along the lines of "Only parameterless constructors and initializers are allowed in Linq To Entities". I am trying to generate HTML from my entities to update an HTML table using AJAX.

public class Foo
{
    public int Bar1 { get; set; }
    public string Bar2 { get; set; }
    public DateTime Bar3 { get; set; }
}

XElement[] elements = (
            from x in FooEntities.Foos
            select new XElement("tr",
                new XElement("td", HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(x.Bar1)),
                new XElement("td", HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(x.Bar2)),
                new XElement("td", HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(x.Bar3)))
            )
            .ToArray<XElement>(); // Error

XElement html = new XElement("table", headerXElement, elements);
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1  
As a side note, you don't need to specify type argument in ToArray call, as it will be inferred by compiler. – Dan Abramov Aug 10 '11 at 20:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, the error message speaks for itself.

Only parameterless constructors and initializers are allowed in Linq To Entities.

LINQ to Entities can be hard to please, what do you think?
Call ToArray right after you get the entities so you're only dealing with LINQ to Objects:

var foos = (from x in FooEntities.Foos
            select x).ToArray();

XElement[] elements = (
            from x in foos
            select new XElement("tr",
                new XElement("td", HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(x.Bar1)),
                new XElement("td", HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(x.Bar2)),
                new XElement("td", HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(x.Bar3)))
            )
        .ToArray();

XElement html = new XElement("table", headerXElement, elements);

It's also a good practice to separate the database call (first query) and business object / XML generation (the second query) because you immediately see what executes against the database and what goes in memory.

share|improve this answer
    
I concur, haha. I figured it out just about when you posted this. i did foreach (var x in foos) html.Add(new XElement... – Tom Fobear Aug 10 '11 at 21:41

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