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WARNING : This is one BIG Question


I have a design problem that started simple, but in one step of growth has stumped me completely.

The simple version of reality has a nice flat fact table...
All names have been changed to protect the innocent

CREATE TABLE raw_data (
  tier0_id INT, tier1_id  INT, tier2_id INT, tier3_id INT,
  metric0  INT, metric1   INT, metric2  INT, metric3  INT
)

The tierIDs relate to entities in a fixed depth tree. Such as a business hierarchy.

The metrics are just performance figures, such as number of frogs captured, or pigeons released.

In the reporting the kindly user would make selections to mean something like the following:

  • tier0_id's 34 and 55 - shown separately
  • all of tier1_id's - grouped together
  • all of tier2_id's - grouped together
  • all of tier3_id's - shown separately
  • metrics 2 and 3

This gives me the following type of query:

SELECT
  CASE WHEN @t0_grouping = 1 THEN NULL ELSE tier0_id END AS tier0_id,
  CASE WHEN @t1_grouping = 1 THEN NULL ELSE tier1_id END AS tier1_id,
  CASE WHEN @t2_grouping = 1 THEN NULL ELSE tier2_id END AS tier2_id,
  CASE WHEN @t3_grouping = 1 THEN NULL ELSE tier3_id END AS tier3_id,
  SUM(metric2) AS metric2, SUM(metric3) AS metric3
FROM
  raw_data
INNER JOIN tier0_values ON tier0_values.id = raw_data.tier0_id OR tier0_values.id IS NULL
INNER JOIN tier1_values ON tier1_values.id = raw_data.tier1_id OR tier1_values.id IS NULL
INNER JOIN tier2_values ON tier2_values.id = raw_data.tier2_id OR tier2_values.id IS NULL
INNER JOIN tier3_values ON tier3_values.id = raw_data.tier3_id OR tier3_values.id IS NULL
GROUP BY
  CASE WHEN @t0_grouping = 1 THEN NULL ELSE tier0_id END,
  CASE WHEN @t1_grouping = 1 THEN NULL ELSE tier1_id END,
  CASE WHEN @t2_grouping = 1 THEN NULL ELSE tier2_id END,
  CASE WHEN @t3_grouping = 1 THEN NULL ELSE tier3_id END

It's a nice hybrid of Dynamic SQL, and parametrised queries. And yes, I know, but SQL-CE makes people do strange things. Besides, that can be tidied up as and when the following change gets incorporated...


From now on, we need to be able to include NULLs in the different tiers. This will mean "applies to ALL entities in that tier".

For example, with the following very simplified data:

Activity    WorkingTime    ActiveTime    BusyTime

   1            0m             10m          0m
   2            0m             15m          0m
   3            0m             20m          0m
  NULL         60m              0m         45m

WorkingTime never applies to an activity, so al the values go in with a NULL ID. But ActiveTime is specifically about a specific activity, so it goes in with a legitimate ID. BusyTime is also against a NULL activity because it's the cumulation of all the ActiveTime.

If one were to report on this data, the NULL values -always- get included in every row, because the NULL -means- "applies to everything". The data would look like...

Activity    WorkingTime    ActiveTime    BusyTime   (BusyOnOtherActivities)

   1           60m             10m         45m            (45-10 = 35m)
   2           60m             15m         45m            (45-15 = 30m)
   3           60m             20m         45m            (45-20 = 25m)

  1&2          60m             25m         45m            (45-25 = 20m)
  1&3          60m             30m         45m            (45-30 = 15m)
  2&3          60m             35m         45m            (45-35 = 10m)

  ALL          60m             45m         45m            (45-45 =  0m)



Hopefully this example makes sense, because it's actually a multi-tiered hierarchy (as per the original example), and in every tier NULLs are allowed. So I'll try an example with 3 tiers...

t0_id  |  t1_id  |  t2_id   |   m1  |  m2  |  m3  |  m4  |  m5
    1         3        10   |    0     10      0      0      0
    1         4        10   |    0     15      0      0      0
    1         5        10   |    0     20      0      0      0
    1      NULL        10   |   60      0     45      0      0
    2         3        10   |    0      5      0      0      0
    2         5        10   |    0     10      0      0      0
    2         6        10   |    0     15      0      0      0
    2      NULL        10   |   50      0     30      0      0
    1         3        11   |    0      7      0      0      0
    1         4        11   |    0      8      0      0      0
    1         5        11   |    0      9      0      0      0
    1      NULL        11   |   30      0     24      0      0
    2         3        11   |    0      8      0      0      0
    2         5        11   |    0     10      0      0      0
    2         6        11   |    0     12      0      0      0
    2      NULL        11   |   40      0     30      0      0
 NULL      NULL        10   |    0      0      0     60      0
 NULL      NULL        11   |    0      0      0     60      0
 NULL      NULL      NULL   |    0      0      0      0      2

This would give many, many possible different output records in the reporting, but here are a few examples...

t0_id  |  t1_id  |  t2_id   |   m1  |  m2  |  m3  |  m4  |  m5

    1         3        10   |   60     10     45     60      2
    1         4        10   |   60     15     45     60      2
    1         5        10   |   60     20     45     60      2

    2         3        10   |   50      5     30     60      2
    2         5        10   |   50     10     30     60      2
    2         6        10   |   50     15     30     60      2

    1       ALL        10   |   60     45     45     60      2
    2       ALL        10   |   50     30     30     60      2

  ALL         3        10   |  110     15     75     60      2
  ALL         4        10   |   60     15     45     60      2
  ALL         5        10   |  110     30     75     60      2
  ALL         6        10   |   50     15     30     60      2

  ALL         3       ALL   |  180     30    129    120      2
  ALL         4       ALL   |   90     23     69    120      2
  ALL         5       ALL   |  180     49    129    120      2
  ALL         6       ALL   |   90     27     60    120      2

  ALL       ALL        10   |  110    129    129     60      2
  ALL       ALL        11   |   70    129    129     60      2
  ALL       ALL       ALL   |  180    129    129    120      2

    1       3&4       ALL   |   90     40     69    120      2
  ALL       3&4       ALL   |  180     53    129    120      2


As messy as this is to explain, it makes complete and logical sense in my head. I understand what is being asked, but for the life of me I can not seem to write a query for this that doesn't take excruciating amounts of time to execute.

So, how would you write such a query, and/or refactor the schema?

I appreciate that people will ask for examples of what I've done so far, but I'm eager to hear other people's uncorrupted ideas and advice first ;)

share|improve this question
    
just on the surface, the main table seems to be improperly normalized. does this lend itself to key/value pairs instead? –  Randy Aug 10 '11 at 21:10
    
Possibly. I've tried storing it in an E-A-V structure, where E is actually multiple columns (the tiers) and A is the metric 'ID'. In terms of the resultant queries I wrote; they're still pigs. –  MatBailie Aug 10 '11 at 21:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem looks more like a normalization activity. I would start with normalizing the table to something like: (You may need some more identity fields depending on your usage)

CREATE TABLE raw_data (
    rawData_ID INT,
    Activity_id INT, 
    metric0  INT)

I'd create a tiering table that looks something like: (tierplan allows for multiple groupings. If a tier_id has no parent to roll up under, then tierparent_id is NULL This alllows for recursion in the query.)

CREATE TABLE tiers (
    tierplan_id INT,
    tier_id INT,
    tierparent_id INT)

Finally, I'd create a table that relates tiers and Activities something like:

CREATE TABLE ActivTiers (
    Activplan_id INT, --id on the table
    tierplan_id INT,  --tells what tierplan the raw_data falls under
    rawdata_id INT)   --this allows the ActivityId to be payload instead of identifier.

Queries off of this ought to be "not too difficult."

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I think I may have cause a little confusion with my examples :) "Activity" is just a one-tier hierarchy used for the example. But the idea of refactoring the tiers as a recursively defined fixed depth tree structure may have merrit. I'll be trying that after I've had some sleep :) –  MatBailie Aug 11 '11 at 5:00
    
Agreed, problem 1 is normalization (or partial use thereof). I almost feel like this was a temp-table used when creating a (pre-defined format) report, not the base table. @Dems When modifying your table into higher normalization forms, try not to store derived fields (there seem to be more here than I initially noticed). (Holding off on own answer until OP shows next revision). –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 11 '11 at 16:20

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