Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a project that uses TCP sockets to communicate between a server and one client. As of now I have been doing this on one computer so I have just used local address of "127.0.0.1" for the address to bind and connect to on both sides and its worked fine. Now I have a second computer to act as a client, but I don't know how to change the addresses accordingly. They are connected through a network that is not connected to the Internet. Before the code looked like this -

Server -

 struct addrinfo hints;
struct addrinfo *servinfo; //will point to the results

//store the connecting address and size
struct sockaddr_storage their_addr;
socklen_t their_addr_size;


memset(&hints, 0, sizeof hints); //make sure the struct is empty
hints.ai_family = AF_INET; //local address
hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM; //tcp
hints.ai_flags = AI_PASSIVE; //use local-host address

//get server info, put into servinfo
if ((status = getaddrinfo("127.0.0.1", port, &hints, &servinfo)) != 0) {
    fprintf(stderr, "getaddrinfo error: %s\n", gai_strerror(status));
    return false;
}

//make socket
fd = socket(servinfo->ai_family, servinfo->ai_socktype, servinfo->ai_protocol);
if (fd < 0) {
    printf("\nserver socket failure %m", errno);
    return false;
}

//allow reuse of port
int yes=1;
if (setsockopt(fd,SOL_SOCKET,SO_REUSEADDR,(char*) &yes,sizeof(int)) == -1) {
    perror("setsockopt");
    return false;
}

//unlink and bind
unlink("127.0.0.1");
if(bind (fd, servinfo->ai_addr, servinfo->ai_addrlen) < 0) {
    printf("\nBind error %m", errno);
    return false;
}

Client -

struct addrinfo hints;
struct addrinfo *servinfo; //will point to the results

memset(&hints, 0, sizeof hints); //make sure the struct is empty
hints.ai_family = AF_INET; //local address
hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM; //tcp
hints.ai_flags = AI_PASSIVE; //use local-host address

//get server info, put into servinfo
if ((status = getaddrinfo("127.0.0.1", port, &hints, &servinfo)) != 0) {
    fprintf(stderr, "getaddrinfo error: %s\n", gai_strerror(status));
    return false;
}

//make socket
fd = socket(servinfo->ai_family, servinfo->ai_socktype, servinfo->ai_protocol);
if (fd < 0) {
    printf("\nserver socket failure %m", errno);
    return false;
}

//connect
if(connect(fd, servinfo->ai_addr, servinfo->ai_addrlen) < 0) {
    printf("\nclient connection failure %m", errno);
    return false;
}

I know it should be simple, but I can't figure out how to change the IPs to get them to work. I tried setting the server computer's IP address in the quotes in these lines - if ((status = getaddrinfo("127.0.0.1", port, &hints, &servinfo)) != 0) and unlink("127.0.0.1");

and then change the address in the client code to the client computer's IP address in this line - if ((status = getaddrinfo("127.0.0.1", port, &hints, &servinfo)) != 0)

Whenever I do that, it tells me connection refused. I have also tried doing the opposite way of putting the server's address in the client's line and client's address in the server's lines along with a few other attempts. At this point I feel like I am just guessing though. So can someone please help me understand how to change this from using the local address with one computer to connecting two computers? Any help is appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
What are the IPs ? Can you ping between them ? Are you sure there's no firewall ? –  cnicutar Aug 10 '11 at 21:05
    
The server ip is 192.168.2.4 and the client's is 192.168.43.16. I haven't thought about a firewall though. I am using ubuntu for this by the way if that is important at all. –  Sterling Aug 10 '11 at 21:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, unlink("127.0.0.1"); is totally wrong here, don't do that.

Then, you have two computers connected by some network. Both should have IP addresses. Replace 127.0.0.1 with the server's IP address in both client and the server. The server does not to have to know client's address beforehand - it'll get that information from the accept(2) call. The client needs server's address to know where to connect. The server needs its own address for the bind(2) call.

share|improve this answer
    
So what use is the client's ip address for the client? Nothing? –  Sterling Aug 10 '11 at 21:08
    
It'll be used by the client's kernel as the source address when sending packets out to the server. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Aug 10 '11 at 21:11
    
Also check out Per's answer - you don't need AI_PASSIVE at all here. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Aug 10 '11 at 21:14
    
@Sterling: yeah pretty much - you don't need it in your client program. The kernel figures out which interface the to use based on what's in the routing table, so 99% of the time in client side code you don't need to specify the client side (source) ip address. –  sashang Aug 10 '11 at 23:06
    
Accepting this one as the most straight-forward answer. Thanks to everyone for the help. –  Sterling Aug 11 '11 at 14:11

The main problem is that your putting AI_PASSIVE in your client code. AI_PASSIVE is meant for servers only (that's what it signals).

Also on the server side you should first of all not call unlink. That's for AF_UNIX sockets only, not AF_INET. Secondly you don't need to put "127.0.0.1" in the getaddrinfo line on the server side. It's better to use NULL to bind to all available addresses.

If you change those things, I believe your code should work. However you're actually supposed to loop on the getaddrinfo result using the ai_next pointer and try to connect to each result, using the first that succeeds.

share|improve this answer
    
I have changed the code accordingly. But now it just hangs when I call the connect function. Why would it do this? –  Sterling Aug 10 '11 at 21:29
    
Most likely a firewall. If you wait long enough you'll probably get "Connection timed out". Are you sure the computers can talk to each other? Instead of using the client code, use telnet or nc to try to connect from the client machine to the server address and port. –  Per Johansson Aug 10 '11 at 21:51
    
My understanding is that firewalls don't affect lan traffic though. Is that wrong? –  Sterling Aug 10 '11 at 22:09

Connection Refused usually means your client received a RST to his SYN. This is most often caused by the lack of a listening socket on the server, on the port you're trying to connect to.

  1. Run your server
  2. On the CLI, type netstat -ant. Do you see an entry that's in LISTEN state on your port?

Something like:

tcp4       0      0  *.3689                 *.*                    LISTEN  

I bet you do not, and therefore have a problem with your server listening socket. I also bet the changes you made this this line:

if ((status = getaddrinfo("127.0.0.1", port, &hints, &servinfo)) != 0) {

Weren't quite right. Try changing that IP to 0.0.0.0 on the server to tell it to to bind to any IP on the system. On the client, that line should have the IP address of the server. You should also remove the unlink() call in the server; unnecessary.

If you do have a listening socket, then there's probably a firewall or something in between your boxes that's blocking the SYN. Try typing service iptables stop on the CLI of both systems.

share|improve this answer
    
I did the netstat -ant and got this - tcp 0 0 127.0.0.1:631 0.0.0:* LISTEN tcp 1 0 192.168.43.16:48744 91.189.89.144:80 CLOSE_WAIT tcp6 0 0 ::1:631 :::* LISTEN It seems the server side is listening, but it has the local address instead of the ip for the wlan. –  Sterling Aug 10 '11 at 21:36
    
which server did you run the netstat on? from the CLOSE_WAIT line and your comment re: IPs, it looks like that came from your client. if you still think your listener is bound to 127.0.0.1, make sure the IP in the servinfo struct is 0.0.0.0 on the server. –  J.J. Aug 10 '11 at 21:47
    
Yes, I ran it on the client side. I switched the NULL with "0.0.0.0", but it didn't change anything. The code just hangs at the connect call now. –  Sterling Aug 10 '11 at 21:51
    
The listening socket needs to be confirmed on the server, not the client. re: hanging -- Do you have an accept() call anywhere in your server code? –  J.J. Aug 10 '11 at 21:56
    
Yes, after the code I posted above there is a listen call and then an accept call. –  Sterling Aug 10 '11 at 21:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.