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We have a question we ask at our office during interviews that goes like this. For the sake of consistency, I am restricting the context of this to python. I'm sure there are other answers but I'm really only interested in python answers.

Write me a function named say that when called like this:

>>> say('Hello')('World')

It ONLY Prints (not returns):

>>> say('Hello')('World')
Hello World
>>> 

We got into a meta discussion after the interview today where I stated that I am always hoping the applicant will answer with the following.

def say(x):
 print "Hello World"
 return lambda a:None

I realized that there is a possibility of shortening this further by replacing the lambda function with a built in of some sort that returns None but I've dug and can't seem to find one that is shorter than lambda a:None

So the overall question here is...

Can you think of a way to make this shorter, as in less overall characters (ignoring line breaks). Any import statements are counted in your character count. (52 Characters)

UPDATE

(39 Characters)

>>> def p(x):
...  print "Hello",x
>>> say=lambda x:p
>>> say("Hello")("World")
Hello World
>>>

Python 3 Answer (48 Characters)

>>> def say(x):
...  return lambda a:print("Hello World")
>>> say("Hello")("World")
Hello World
>>> 
share|improve this question
1  
do you want say to actually use it's arguments? or should it always just print 'Hello World'? –  James Wilcox Aug 10 '11 at 21:13
2  
The entire point of the post is he thinks it would be funny if it didn't use its arguments. –  agf Aug 10 '11 at 21:20
    
yes, we are ok with something that always prints "Hello World" because often when we phrase the question, our language leaves room for this output. –  Aaron Merriam Aug 10 '11 at 21:21
1  
And what makes this interesting? –  Don Roby Aug 10 '11 at 21:25
1  
@Don Roby The rule of fun? –  Evpok Aug 10 '11 at 21:45
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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Python 2.x answers

The obvious answer that doesn't actually count because it returns the string instead of printing it:

>>> say = lambda x: lambda y: x + " " + y
>>> say('Hello')('World')
'Hello World'

This one is 45 characters counting newlines:

def p(x):
 print "Hello World"
say=lambda x:p

This method drops it down to 41 characters but it looks kind of odd since it uses one argument but not the other:

def p(x):
 print "Hello",x
say=lambda x:p

Python 3.x answers

36 characters:

>>> say=lambda x:lambda y:print(x+" "+y)
>>> say('Hello')('World')
Hello World

38 characters:

>>> say=lambda x:print(x,end=' ') or print
>>> say('Hello')('World')
Hello World
share|improve this answer
    
This returns the argument, it needs to actually print it. I'll clarify my question. –  Aaron Merriam Aug 10 '11 at 21:18
    
Yeah that's basically the answer with which any competent programmer should come up with. I mean who in their right mind would try the above in a serious interview for a job he really, really wanted? Probably depends also on the tone of the interview and I could imagine myself throwing the first one in just for fun before answering it correctly –  Voo Aug 10 '11 at 21:31
    
@F.J - Sorry to keep respecifying. The import statements make your character count longer. I count 76. I've again re-clarified my question. –  Aaron Merriam Aug 10 '11 at 21:40
    
this was fun. I'll pop back by here later and check for better answers, but for now, you've got it. –  Aaron Merriam Aug 10 '11 at 22:04
add comment
def say(x):
   print x,
   return say
share|improve this answer
    
see the edit I made above. Yours still returns a function. Sorry to be so specific. –  Aaron Merriam Aug 10 '11 at 21:33
1  
+1 clever that. –  Voo Aug 10 '11 at 21:33
add comment

At least in Python 3, print is a function that returns None, so you can do this:

def say(x):
    return lambda a: print ('Hello World')

or (saving a few more characters):

say=lambda x:lambda y:print("Hello World")
share|improve this answer
    
Oooh. Sneaky python 3 answer. I like it! –  Aaron Merriam Aug 10 '11 at 21:45
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