Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Running this query:

select name from folders order by name

returns these results:

alphanumeric
a test
test 20
test 19
test 1
test 10

But I expected:

a test
alphanumeric
test 1
test 10
test 19
test 20

What's wrong here?

share|improve this question
1  
It looks weird: 'test 20' < 'test 19'. What LC_COLLATE you have by examinating SHOW lc_collate; ? I have en_US.UTF-8 and it returns exactly wanted output with ORDER BY name ASC. –  Grzegorz Szpetkowski Aug 10 '11 at 22:32
    
I get the same thing, too. I just did select 'alphanumeric' < 'a test' and got f. –  Ray Toal Aug 10 '11 at 22:34
1  
for the record, i posted an answer pointing you to the manual entry for collation. it was donwvoted as not being huggy-lovey enough so i deleted it. but i think you should start there. –  andrew cooke Aug 10 '11 at 22:37
    
@andrew cooke: I didn't downvote, that was good point, collation is responsible for ordering, however per-column collation, which could be useful here is supported only since Postgres 9.1. –  Grzegorz Szpetkowski Aug 10 '11 at 22:41
    
Hello, thk for your comments... SHOW lc_collate; is returning es_SV.UTF-8 (I live in El Salvador) –  el_quick Aug 10 '11 at 22:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may be able to manually sort by splitting the text up in case there is trailing numerals, like so:

SELECT * FROM sort_test
ORDER BY SUBSTRING(text FROM '^(.*?)( \\d+)?$'),
         COALESCE(SUBSTRING(text FROM ' (\\d+)$')::INTEGER, 0);

This will sort on column text, first by all characters optionally excluding an ending space followed by digits, then by those optional digits.

Worked well in my test.

Update fixed the string-only sorting with a simple coalesce (duh).

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? It works, and solves the situation. It's not the best solution, but it doesn't involve changing the database structure. At least comment if you feel the need to downvote. –  OverZealous Aug 10 '11 at 23:54
    
-1 for bizarre kluge that doesn't solve the real problem. (What about strings with multiple spaces and/or numbers?) See the comments above about collations. –  Ryan Culpepper Aug 10 '11 at 23:56
    
I wouldn't say it's a bizarre kludge. It adds the ability to sort trailing numbers numerically, without requiring a specific version of PG. It handles trailing numbers very well, so works well for sequentially numbered folders. It handles multiple spaces, because it's only checking to ensure that there is at least one space before the trailing digits. If you tried it, you'd see it worked, instead of assuming. –  OverZealous Aug 10 '11 at 23:59
    
Not working for texts like: "H1C11", because it order for the first number, not for the tailing –  DariusVE Jul 21 at 15:58

You can simply cast name column to bytea datatype allowing collate-agnostic orderding:

SELECT name
FROM folders
ORDER BY name::bytea;

Wanted result:

     name     
--------------
 a test
 alphanumeric
 test 1
 test 10
 test 19
 test 20
(6 rows)
share|improve this answer

OverZealous answer helped me but didn't work if the string in the database begun with numbers followed by additional characters.

The following worked for me:

SELECT name
FROM folders
ORDER BY
COALESCE(SUBSTRING(name FROM '^(\\d+)')::INTEGER, 99999999),
SUBSTRING(name FROM '^\\d* *(.*?)( \\d+)?$'),
COALESCE(SUBSTRING(name FROM ' (\\d+)$')::INTEGER, 0),
name;

So this one:

  1. Extracts the first number in the string, or uses 99999999.
  2. Extracts the string that follows the possible first number.
  3. Extracts a trailing number, or uses 0.
share|improve this answer

Tor's last SQL worked for me. However if you are calling this code from php you need add extra slashes.

SELECT name
FROM folders
ORDER BY
COALESCE(SUBSTRING(name FROM '^(\\\\d+)')::INTEGER, 99999999),
SUBSTRING(name FROM '^\\\\d* *(.*?)( \\\\d+)?$'),
COALESCE(SUBSTRING(name FROM ' (\\\\d+)$')::INTEGER, 0),
name;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.