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I would like to do this so that the clickable region on the tag is size of the LI.

My html looks like:

<li>
 <a href="#">Link</a>
</li>
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Same for table cell, explicitly requires height fill: stackoverflow.com/questions/3966027/… –  Ciro Santilli Nov 17 at 8:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 18 down vote accepted

As others have said

li a { display: block; }

should achieve what you're after. But you must also remove any padding from the <li> and set it on the <a> instead. For example:

li { padding: 0; }
  li a { display: block; padding: 1em; }
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1  
Yes, moving the padding (if any) from the li to the a is very important here. A lot of tutorials and examples fail to mention this. Thanks for pointing it out! –  Joseph Jun 6 '12 at 7:23
    
You could use padding (or margin/border) and use calc to calculate the full height: height: calc(100% - 4px) - assuming you have padding: 2px on that element. –  gion_13 Oct 25 '13 at 12:14
    
You could, but you'd be introducing the wholly unnecessary overhead of dynamically calculating the height. Do not underestimate the number of CPU cycles that can be wasted on rendering messy CSS; KISS for maximum responsiveness. –  Ola Tuvesson Aug 3 at 0:25

Just another option I used is create a transparent png image in photoshop and put it inside the anchor tag, make its position absolute and increase its dimensions to fit that parent div you want and you could have a large clickable area.

<a href="test.html" />
 <img id="cover_img" src="cover.png" />
</a>

#cover_img {
display: block;
height: 200px;
width: 193px;
position: absolute;
}

Might be useful in certain circumstances.

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If you currently have this same question you can simply add padding to the right place:

li {
  //remove any padding or margin attributes from here
}

li a {
  display: block;
  padding: 20px; //or however big you want the clickable area to be
}

Anchor tags are by default inline elements, so you have to explicitly change them to display as block elements before you can mess with the padding or the margins.

Hope this helps!

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You can also use display: inline-block; to make them work just like blocks, but while staying in line with other elements. –  Jesse Mar 29 '13 at 7:40

Try this css

li{
    border:1px solid black;
    height:40px;
}

li a{
    border:1px solid red;
    display:block;
    height:100%;
}

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In CSS:

li a {
     display: block;
}

Of course, you'll want to make your selector more specific than that.

<ul>
    <li class="myClass">
        <a href="#">Link</a>
    </li>
</ul>

li.myClass a {
    display: block;
    background-color: #fdd; /* Demo only */
}

http://jsfiddle.net/userdude/jmj2k/

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I tried this CSS property earlier, and it only expands the width of the <a> tag horizontally, it doesn't in fact make the <a> tag fill up the <li> –  Alexa Green Aug 11 '11 at 0:17
    
Then I would say you did not provide enough context for your question. This is the answer for what you provided. If you have a specific implementation in mind, you need to provide that in your question. –  Jared Farrish Aug 11 '11 at 0:18
    
@Brian - The alternative would be to wrap your LI content with the A tag, depending on the details. However, it's hard to say without seeing that detail. –  Jared Farrish Aug 11 '11 at 0:23

This will make the entire area clickable.

li a { display: block; }
share|improve this answer
1  
I tried this CSS property earlier, and it only expands the width of the <a> tag horizontally, it doesn't make the <a> tag the size of the parent <li> –  Alexa Green Aug 11 '11 at 0:17

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