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I have eliminated two header inclusions in a translation unit using extern. Is this advisable?

My specific situation: I have a class called ParseTree that accumulates Token*'s. ParseTree* is a private member of Parser.

Initially, I had the following lines in parse_tree.cc.

#include "parser.h"
#include "token.h"

After analyzing my code, I isolated the two functions that actually had external dependencies and replaced the includes with the following:

extern std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Token& t); // @token.h
extern bool hasPriority(const Token* p_tok1, Token* p_tok2); // @parser.h

Both solutions appear to work. Are there any hidden dangers of which I should be aware when selecting extern over include?

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2  
External linkage is the default for function declarations so extern itself is redundant. –  Charles Bailey Aug 11 '11 at 9:12
    
That's a very good point I overlooked. –  Jordan Gray Aug 11 '11 at 14:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you use extern declarations, you're unnecessarily repeating yourself by restating the prototype of the function everywhere you use it. With a header file, if you want to change the prototype, you only need to change it in one place.

So no, don't use extern when you already have a suitable header file.

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People seem to strongly advise reducing dependencies and keeping relationships between translation units to a minimum. For instance, pimpl and forward declaration. How is this technique different from those two? Pimpl idiom in particular has an abundance of potential downsides/complications.. –  Jordan Gray Aug 11 '11 at 5:04
    
+1 for "suitable header file". I've seen use for the other option as a build-time optimization when many large header files got chained in by a single include. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 11 '11 at 5:08
1  
@Jordan: You don't have to change pimpls when you update the true (one) definition. What you described is forward declaration, and ideally it would be contained in a "suitable" (not dependency-inflating) header file. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 11 '11 at 5:11
    
@Jordan: With Pimpl, you are not going to change the type of the pimpl pointer. With forward declaration, you're not likely to change the name of the type. But with functions, you can easily change the definition of the parameters to that function. It's simply a matter of the frequency of change. Also, people generally suggest putting forward declarations in a header, one that is separate from the definition of those types. That way, if you need the declarations, you can include a small header. –  Nicol Bolas Aug 11 '11 at 5:12
1  
@Jordan, if you think it is worthwhile, you may create new header(s) which would be included in parse_tree.cc, parser.h and token.h; but there are two rules I strongly recommend not to break: an header should be self-contained (ideally enforce by having a CU which has it has first header) and, excepted for classes, there should be at most one declaration which isn't the definition, CU which need it should include the file which contain it. Minimizing the number of includes is worthwhile, but subordinated to these rules. –  AProgrammer Aug 11 '11 at 6:38

Both solutions appear to work. Are there any hidden dangers of which I should be aware when selecting extern over include?

Yes. The API may be changing, and the compiler won't work for you, it will work against you.

Learn to use the compiler to your advantage. No, not only "NOW", on the long term I mean. The long term is where you make stupid mistakes, not when there's everything fresh in your head. Yes, your brain's memory is somehow volatile.

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Usually one reduces dependencies by forward-declaring classes. Here's an example. Say we have two prerequisite headers, parser.h and token.h, defined as follows:

parser.h:

class Parser
{
public:
  void doFoo();
  void doBar();
  // ... lots of other stuff
};

token.h:

class Token
{
public:
  void doQuux();
  void doBaz();
  // ... continues for a while
};

Now, having a "user,h" which uses those two, instead of writing it like:

#include "parser.h"
#include "token.h"

void useParserAndToken( Parser &, Token & );

you write

class Parser;
class Token;

void useParserAndToken( Parser &, Token & );

This way you end up saying that there are classes Parser and Token, but how they are defined exactly doesn't matter. This results in faster compiles.

In order to reduce dependencies you usually only forward-declare classes. Duplicating function declarations doesn't make much sense, on the other hand.

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