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#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <numeric>
using namespace std;

float mean (float num[], float n)
{
    int i;
    float sum=0;
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)
    sum=sum+num[i];
    return (sum/n);

}
int main()  
{

    int minusElements;  
    int n;
    cout << "Enter number of Elements:";  
    cin >> n;



    minusElements = n - 1  ;
    int i,j, num[n];  
    float  temp;

    float f;
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)  
    {
    cin >> f;
    num.push_back(f);
    }


    cout << "Enter " << n << " numbers:\n";
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)  
    cin >> num[i];
    cin.get();
    float m = mean(&num[0], num.size());


}  

//33 request for member `push_back' in `num', which is of non-class type `int[((unsigned int)((int)n))]' 

//41 request for member `size' in `num', which is of non-class type `int[((unsigned int)((int)n))]' 
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3  
I don't see a question. –  sharptooth Aug 11 '11 at 5:03
    
Please indent your code (it's more likely to make people want to answer), and also include the following things in the body: what the goal of this code is, what you've tried, and what's not working. –  Chris Aug 11 '11 at 5:04
    
I see uninitialized variables in mean. –  Benjamin Bannier Aug 11 '11 at 5:04
    
@Chris I fixed the code indentation, but in doing so I discovered a big nesting of code (like for loops) without { } surrounding braces, which made it very difficult for me to ascertain what was intentionally nested code and what wasnt. John: if you could please add { } braces so we know what code should be nested and what code shouldnt be. –  Moses Aug 11 '11 at 5:12
    
how to post the question? –  John Aug 16 '11 at 1:55
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closed as not a real question by sharptooth, Chris, Benjamin Bannier, Richard, Kerrek SB Aug 12 '11 at 8:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers

First thing first:

 int num[numElements];  

This is not allowed in Standard C++. Its variable length array (VLA) since numElements is not a const expression. VLA is allowed only in C99.


cout << "Mean:"<< mean(num,n);

mean() takes float* but type of num is int[] which can convert to int*, but not to float*. Hence the error.

The solution is : in C++, use std::vector<float> as:

#include <vector> //must include this!

std::vector<float> num;

float f;
for(i=0;i<numElements;i++)  
{
  cin >> f;
  num.push_back(f);
}

//then call mean() as
float m = mean(&num[0], num.size());

Beside all these, your mean() function is wrongly implemented. What is numElements? Its an uninitialized variable which you're using in the for loop. This invokes undefined-behaviour. Solution is : you don't need numElements to begin with. Just use n which you pass to the function as argument.


Also, in C++, you don't even need a function to calculate the mean, you can use functions from <numeric> as:

#include <numeric>

//if num is std::vector
float mean = std::accumulate(num.begin(), num.end(), 0) / num.size();

//if num is float[n] or float* (num of elements = n)
float mean = std::accumulate(num, num + n, 0) / n;

Alright. Since you're a beginner and wants to learn how to solve this problem. After you tried yourself which didn't work, so here is how you should be doing this:

C-style coding in C++:

#include <iostream>

float mean (float *num, int n)
{
    float sum = 0;
    for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++ )
          sum += num[i];
    return sum/n; 
}
int main()  
{
    int count; 
    std::cin >> count;
    float *numbers = new float[count]; //allocate memory!

    for(int i=0; i< count ;i++)  
    {
       std::cin >> numbers[i];
    }
    std::cout << mean(numbers, count) << std::endl;
    delete [] numbers; //must deallocate the memory!
}

Input (number of elements followed by the elements on the next line):

6
12 89 23 12 32 11

Output:

29.8333

Online Demo : http://www.ideone.com/hdZPd

Note C-style coding in C++ is not recommended, but its okay for learning purpose only.


C++ style coding in C++:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <numeric>

int main()  
{
    int count; 
    std::cin >> count;
    std::vector<float> numbers(count);

    for(int i=0; i< count ;i++)  
    {
       std::cin >> numbers[i];
    }
    float mean = std::accumulate(numbers.begin(), numbers.end(), 0.0)/ numbers.size();
    std::cout << mean << std::endl;
}

Input (number of elements followed by the elements on the next line):

6
12 89 23 12 32 11

Output:

29.8333

Online Demo : http://www.ideone.com/aZ7u8

Hope it helps you understanding the problem and the solution in both style.

share|improve this answer
    
He's probably using one where it allows you to do so, from the title you can see he has an issue with passing an int array to a function that wants a float array. Although he should fix his question.... –  Jesus Ramos Aug 11 '11 at 5:05
    
thanks for the info –  John Aug 11 '11 at 5:14
    
I'm just a newbie in C++ –  John Aug 11 '11 at 5:22
    
@John: No problem. You will learn C++ gradually. In this case, you don't even need mean() function. See my answer again. I explained how you can use std::accumulate function from <numeric> header. –  Nawaz Aug 11 '11 at 5:23
    
@Nawaz: Sir, can we start at the beginning? –  John Aug 11 '11 at 5:36
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Based on the title to this question, I'm fairly certain your problem is with this line:

int num[numElements], i,j,temp;

You meant:

int i,j;
// shouldn't be using num[numElements] in c++ (see Nawaz's answer for why)
float num[], temp; // temp *also* should be a fload based on usage.

You also seem to have an extra for(i=0;i<numElements;i++)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the info –  John Aug 11 '11 at 5:14
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Change int num[numElements] to float num[numElements]? You're sending an array of ints to something that expects an array of floats.

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