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I hate to ask such a newbie question but I am certain that I am doing something fundamentally wrong and I am having a hard time finding others out there who are as clueless.

The NEW view of my MCMPART model requires the user to enter values for :length and :width of a part. From those values, I want to derive :squarefeet (:length * :width/144) and the sheet metal :shearsize (:length X :width). To do this I have modified my model as follows:

class Mcmpart < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :sheet
    belongs_to :partloc
    belongs_to :material

    def squarefeet
      self.squarefeet = self.length * self.width/144
    end

    def shearsize
      self.shearsize = [self.length, self.width].join(' X ')
    end

end

The controller is just generic scaffold but here is the create method:

  def create
    @mcmpart = Mcmpart.new(params[:mcmpart])

    respond_to do |format|
      if @mcmpart.save
        format.html { redirect_to(@mcmpart, :notice => 'Mcmpart was successfully created.') }
        format.xml  { render :xml => @mcmpart, :status => :created, :location => @mcmpart }
      else
        format.html { render :action => "new" }
        format.xml  { render :xml => @mcmpart.errors, :status => :unprocessable_entity }
      end
    end
  end

To clarify the construction of the model, here is the database migration file:

class CreateMcmparts < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :mcmparts do |t|
      t.string :partnumber
      t.references :material
      t.references :sheet
      t.references :partloc
      t.decimal :length, :precision => 10, :scale => 3
      t.decimal :width, :precision => 10, :scale => 3
      t.decimal :squarefeet, :precision => 10, :scale => 3
      t.decimal :weight, :precision => 10, :scale => 3
      t.string :shearsize
      t.string :project
      t.boolean :bus

      t.timestamps
    end
  end

  def self.down
    drop_table :mcmparts
  end
end

I am sure someone will spot my problem right away. This is creating a virtual attribute that displays just find in my SHOW view. However, what I want is for this to add the :shearsize and :squarefeet params to my database. Instead I am getting a nil value for both attributes in my database. And since it is not an instance attribute as I require, it is not governed by the precision/scale values set in my database and therefore displays as many as 8 digits after the decimal point.

Is there something I need to do in the controller? I have tried to replace self.shearsize with @mcmpart.shearsize but that just causes my pages to fail.

Kudos to the first person to point out my rookie error(s).

Thank you,

share|improve this question
    
please post your create action from controller –  Bohdan Aug 11 '11 at 5:33
    
Please find the controller code added moments ago. Thank you. –  Byron Aug 11 '11 at 5:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Based on following assumption I am trying to solve your problem.

  1. length and width are not DB attributes.
  2. Mcmpart model is as it is you provided.

First add these lines to your Mcmpart model

before_save :prepopulate #being dumb here, name anything you want but not attribute name like you already did.
attr_accessor :length, width

private

def prepopulate
  self.squarefeet = self.length * self.width/144
  self.shearsize = [self.length, self.width].join(' X ')
end

So this is how your model should look like after these additions.

class Mcmpart < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :sheet
  belongs_to :partloc
  belongs_to :material

  before_save :prepopulate 
  attr_accessor :length, :width

  private

  def prepopulate
    self.squarefeet = self.length * self.width/144
    self.shearsize = [self.length, self.width].join(' X ')
  end
end

This should be working now. If it does not then I need more detail as it is unclear to me. It would be better if you can post controller and model (complete code).

share|improve this answer
    
I should have been clearer in my question. Length and Width are DB attributes. I have added the DB migration file content to the original question to clarify. Thank you. I will attempt to implement your suggestion and watch for any changes in your response that might result from this additional information. –  Byron Aug 11 '11 at 5:56
    
okay then good. Just remove attr_accessor :length, :width from my solution –  ducktyped Aug 11 '11 at 6:01
    
Worked like a champ –  Byron Aug 11 '11 at 13:36

I can see your confusion sheersize and squarefeet are both calculated values right? They work in your views right?

So the only reason you want to store them in your database is so that you can format them right?

If the above assumptions are correct then you don't need to store them in your database you can format them as you calculate them and there are various view helpers to restrict the number of decimal points shown.

I have no idea how many decimal points you want to show but if you wanted to show 2 decimal places you could try this

def squarefeet
  self.squarefeet = self.length * self.width/144
  "%.2f" % self.squarefeet %>
end

def shearsize
  self.shearsize = [self.length, self.width].join(' X ')
  "%.2f" % self.shearsize %>
end

change .2f to .4f if you wanted 4 decimal places or whatever number of decimal places you want to have

If you have other reasons for storing the data in the database then I suggest you use an on save filter and do the calulations in there. If you want more info on that then ask

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks James. The further I get in the learning process the more I am asking myself "what actually does have to go into the database?". Obviously the t.reference attributes do but it there is so much data that can be derived on the client side. Thanks for the tip. –  Byron Aug 11 '11 at 6:05
    
You are on a programming learning curve that is not just Rails specific :) Good luck! –  jamesw Aug 11 '11 at 6:09

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