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I am really confused on why I am getting following compilation error. Microsoft Visual Studio Compiler.

error C2678: binary '=' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'const std::string' (or there is no acceptable conversion)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <iterator>

class MyException {
public:
    MyException(    std::string message, 
                        int line = 0) : m_message(message),
                                        m_line(line) {}
    const char* what() const throw(){
        if ( m_line != 0 ) {
            std::ostringstream custom_message;
            custom_message << "Parsing Error occured at ";
            custom_message << m_line << " Line : ";
            custom_message << m_message;        
            m_message = custom_message.str();
        }
        return m_message.c_str();
    }
private:
    std::string m_message;
    int m_line;
};
int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    try {
        // do something
    }catch(MyException &e){
        std::cout << e.what();
    }
}

Error is coming at line m_message = custom_message.str();

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4  
You're missing the header <string>, which might account for the behavior. –  templatetypedef Aug 11 '11 at 6:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You declare the method as const

const char* what() const throw(){

but then you try to change the object

m_message = custom_message.str();

so you get an error.

What you should do instead is construct the custom message in the constructor.

class MyException {
public:
    MyException(const std::string& message, int line = 0) : 
        m_message(message), m_line(line) {
        if ( m_line != 0 ) {
            std::ostringstream custom_message;
            custom_message << "Parsing Error occured at ";
            custom_message << m_line << " Line : ";
            custom_message << m_message;        
            m_message = custom_message.str();
        }
    }
    const char* what() const throw(){
        return m_message.c_str();
    }
private:
    std::string m_message;
    int m_line;
};

Also I changed your code to pass the std::string by reference, which is usual practice.

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You are trying to assign to MyException::m_message inside a const-qualified method MyException::what(). Inside such what() the entire *this object is considered to be const, which means that m_message member is also const. You can't assign anything to a const-qualified std::string object, since std::string's assignment operator requires a modifiable (i.e. a non-const one) object on the left-hand side. You are supplying a const one.

If you really want to be able to modify the m_message inside what(), you should declare it as mutable member of the class (in this case it appears to be a good idea). Or use some other approach.

As @john noted, in your specific case it makes more sense to actually build m_message in constructor instead of postponing it till what(). I don't really understand why you'd even want to rebuild your m_message every time you call what(). Unless your m_line is expected to change somehow from one call to what() to another, there's really no need to do it every time.

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In addition to the other answers;

You're not including the <string> header, which may be the cause of a problem later.

Something that used to get me a lot is that some std:: headers include others, which allows you to use a class, but maybe only with limited functionality because the std:: headers that they include are the bare minimum that is needed for that file to run. This is quite an annoyance because sometimes you declare a std:: class such as string and you haven't included the header, the definition will be fine but everything else may or may not work - leading you to a lot of debugging because the definition worked fine.

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See the declaration of the what() function, it is marked const (the second const on the line). That means that it cannot alter any member variables, in your case the m_message string. That is why you get the error.

Now, how do you fix it?

Your code is wrong, your what() function will prepend the "Parsing Error occured at " etc. text each time you invoke the what() function. So, instead of doing that having to modify the m_message member, I suggest that you format the entire message in the ctor of the class:

MyException(std::string message, int line = 0)
{
    if (line != 0)
    {
        std::ostringstream custom_message;
        custom_message << "Parsing Error occured at ";
        custom_message << line << " Line : ";
        custom_message << message;        
        m_message = custom_message.str();            
    }
    else
        m_message = message;
}
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