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I am trying to find out if there is an alternative way of converting string to integer in C.

I regularly do the following in my code.

char s[] = "45";

int num = atoi(s);

So, is there a short way or another way

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14  
Your tags and title say you want a solution in C, but your question says C or C++. Which one do you want? –  In silico Aug 11 '11 at 6:32
    
@Yann, Sorry for that confusion. I will prefer C . –  user618677 Aug 11 '11 at 16:16

8 Answers 8

up vote 31 down vote accepted

There is strtol which is better IMO. Also I have taken a liking in strtonum, so use it if you have it (but remember it's not portable):

long long
     strtonum(const char *nptr, long long minval, long long maxval,
     const char **errstr);

EDIT

You might also be interested in strtoumax and strtoimax which are standard. For example you could say:

uintmax_t num = strtoumax(s, NULL, 10);
if (num == UINTMAX_MAX && errno == ERANGE)
    /* Could not convert. */

Anyway, stay away from atoi:

The call atoi(str) shall be equivalent to:

(int) strtol(str, (char **)NULL, 10)

except that the handling of errors may differ. If the value cannot be represented, the behavior is undefined.

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9  
@downvoter A comment would be helpful :-) –  cnicutar Aug 11 '11 at 6:36
    
what do I need to include for strtonum? I keep getting an implicit declaration warning –  trideceth12 Mar 30 '13 at 1:57
    
@trideceth12 On systems where it's available it should be declared in #<stdlib.h>. However, you could use the standard strtoumax alternative. –  cnicutar Mar 30 '13 at 10:21
    
Hmm, can't seem to get a reference to it - I'm using libc 2.15. At first I thought it was because I was using the -ANSI flag, but then even dropping that flag I couldn't get it. –  trideceth12 Mar 31 '13 at 13:21

Don't use functions from ato... group. These are broken and virtually useless. A moderately better solution would be to use sscanf, although it is not perfect either.

To convert string to integer, functions from strto... group should be used. In your specific case it would be strtol function.

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1  
sscanf actually has undefined behavior if it tries to convert a number outside the range of its type (for example, sscanf("999999999999999999999", "%d", &n)). –  Keith Thompson Aug 11 '11 at 6:50
    
@Keith Thompson: That's exactly what I mean. atoi provides no meaningful success/failure feedback and has undefined behavior on overflow. sscanf provides success/failure feedback of sorts (the return value, which is what makes it "moderately better"), but still has undefined behavior on overflow. Only strtol is a viable solution. –  AndreyT Aug 11 '11 at 6:55
    
Agreed; I just wanted to emphasize the potentially fatal problem with sscanf. (Though I confess I sometimes use atoi, usually for programs that I don't expect to survive more than 10 minute before I delete the source.) –  Keith Thompson Aug 11 '11 at 6:58

Yes, you can store the integer directly:

int num = 45;

If you must parse a string, atoi or strol is going to win the "shortest amount of code" contest.

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If you want to do it safely, strtol() actually requires a fair amount of code. It can return LONG_MIN or LONG_MAX either if that's the actual converted value or if there's an underflow or overflow, and it can return 0 either if that's the actual value or if there was no number to convert. You need to set errno = 0 before the call, and check the endptr. –  Keith Thompson Aug 11 '11 at 6:54

In C++, you can use a such function:

template <typename T>
T to(const std::string & s)
{
    std::istringstream stm(s);
    T result;
    stm >> result;

    if(stm.tellg() != s.size())
        throw error;

    return result;
}

This can help you to convert any string to any type such as float, int, double...

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You can code a little atoi() for fun:

int             my_getnbr(char *str)
{
  int           result;
  int           puiss;

  result = 0;
  puiss = 1;
  while (('-' == (*str)) || ((*str) == '+'))
    {
      if (*str == '-')
        puiss = puiss * -1;
      str++;
    }
  while ((*str >= '0') && (*str <= '9'))
    {
      result = (result * 10) + ((*str) - '0');
      str++;
    }
  return (result * puiss);
}

You can also make it recursive wich can old in 3 lines =)

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Thanks so much .. But could you tell me how the below code works? code ((*str) - '0') code –  user618677 Aug 11 '11 at 16:15
    
a character has an ascii value. If you are uner linux type: man ascii in the shell or if not go to:table-ascii.com. You will see that the character '0' = 68 (i think) for a int. So to get the number of '9' (it's '0' + 9) so you get 9 = '9' - '0'. You get it? –  jDourlens Aug 11 '11 at 16:31
    
Thanks a bunch. –  user618677 Aug 11 '11 at 17:22

Full strtol solution with error handling ported to c and extended from c++ taken from How to parse a string to an int in C++? in comment by @Dan Moulding:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <limits.h> //for [LONG|INT][MIN|MAX]
#include <errno.h> //for erno

typedef enum { S2ISUCCESS, S2IOVERFLOW, S2IUNDERFLOW, S2IINCONVERTIBLE } STR2INT_ERROR;
// S2I prefix so as not to conflict with OVERFLOW and UNDEFLOW of math

/* 
* converts string s to int i (output in i), supposing it is base base
*
* max base = 36
*
* returns STR2INT_ERROR accordingly
*
* preceding whitespace is ignored. tailing whitespace will lead to an error.
*
* test in/out:
*
*  "10" 10
*  "-10" -10
*  "10." S2IINCONVERTIBLE
*  "10.0" S2IINCONVERTIBLE
*  "10.0e10" S2IINCONVERTIBLE
*  "a10" S2IINCONVERTIBLE
*  "10a" S2IINCONVERTIBLE
*  " 10" 10
*  "10 " S2IINCONVERTIBLE
*  "1000000000000" S2IOVERFLOW (10^12 > int max)
*  "-1000000000000" S2IINCONVERTIBLE (-10^12 < int min)
*
*/
STR2INT_ERROR str2int (int *i, char *s, int base)
{
  char *end;
  long  l;
  errno = 0;
  l = strtol(s, &end, base);

  if ((errno == ERANGE && l == LONG_MAX) || l > INT_MAX) {
    return S2IOVERFLOW;
  }
  if ((errno == ERANGE && l == LONG_MIN) || l < INT_MIN) {
    return S2IUNDERFLOW;
  }
  if (*s == '\0' || *end != '\0') {
    return S2IINCONVERTIBLE;
  }
  *i = l;
  return S2ISUCCESS;
}


/*same as str2int, but prints errors to stderr*/
STR2INT_ERROR str2int_stderr (int *i, char *s, int base)
{
  STR2INT_ERROR out = str2int (i, s, base);
  if(out == S2IINCONVERTIBLE){
    fprintf(stderr,"\"%s\" is not strtol int \n",s);
  } else if(out == S2IOVERFLOW){
    fprintf(stderr,"\"%s\" is too large for an int. max value: %d\n",s,INT_MAX);
  } else if(out == S2IUNDERFLOW){
    fprintf(stderr,"\"%s\" is too small for an int. min value: %d\n",s,INT_MIN);
  }
  return out;
}

int main(){

  int i;
  STR2INT_ERROR err;
  err = str2int_stderr (&i, "12345681234568", 10);
  if ( err == S2ISUCCESS ){
    fprintf(stderr, "you entered:\n%d\n",i);
  }

  return 0;

}
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This function will help you

int strtoint_n(char* str, int n)
{
    int sign = 1;
    int place = 1;
    int ret = 0;

    int i;
    for (i = n-1; i >= 0; i--, place *= 10)
    {
        int c = str[i];
        switch (c)
        {
            case 45:
                if (i == 0) sign = -1;
                else return -1;
                break;
            default:
                if (c >= 48 && c <= 57) ret += (c - 48) * place;
                else return -1;
        }
    }

    return sign * ret;
}

int strtoint(char* str)
{
    char* temp = str;
    int n = 0;
    while (*temp != '\0')
    {
        n++;
        temp++;
    }
    return strtoint_n(str, n);
}

Ref: http://amscata.blogspot.com/2013/09/strnumstr-version-2.html

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If you know some about the compiler or DFA (NFA),you can write a function to do the same thing like atoi().It is very simple.

EDIT: Here is my code.You should know about DFA or NFA at first.

    #include<stdio.h>
    #include<string.h>

    static inline int is_digit(char c)
   {
      return (c >= '0' && c <= '9');
   }

   static inline int is_hex(char c)
   {
      return is_digit(c) || (c <= 'f' && c >= 'a');
   }

   static inline int hex_to_int(char c)
   {
     return is_digit(c)?c - '0':c - 'a' + 10;
   }

    static inline int is_oct(char c)
    {
     return (c <= '7' && c >= '0');
    }

    /*
     * s is the string to be converted
     * len is the string's length
     * if the coverting goes well,*is_ok will be set 1,or 0
     */
    int to_int(char*s,int len,int*is_ok)
    {
    int res,puiss;
    int i;
    res    = 0;
    puiss  = 1;
    i      = 0;
    *is_ok = 0;/*init*/
    if(s[i] == '-'){
            puiss = -1;
            i++;
    }else if(s[i] == '+')
            i++;

    if(s[i] == '0' ){/*it is oct or hex*/
            i++;
            if(len > i && s[i] == 'x'){
                    i++;
                    if(len > i && is_hex(s[i]))
                            *is_ok = 1;
                    else 
                            return 0;   
        do{
                            res <<= 4;
                            res |= hex_to_int(s[i]);
                            i++;
                    }while(len > i && is_hex(s[i]));
            }else if(len > i && is_oct(s[i])){
                    *is_ok = 1;
                    do{
                            res <<= 3;
                            res |= s[i] - '0';  
                            i++;
                    }while(len > i && is_oct(s[i]));
            }else
                    *is_ok = 1;
    }else{
            if(len > i && is_digit(s[i]))
        *is_ok = 1;
            else
        return 0;
            do{
        res *= 10;
                    res += s[i] - '0';
                    i++;
      }while(len > i && is_digit(s[i]));
            }
            return puiss*res;
    }



    int main()
    {
    char buf[80] = "";
    int  is_ok;int res;
    while(scanf("%s",buf)){
            res = to_int(buf,strlen(buf),&is_ok);
            printf("%s,value:%d.\n",is_ok?"Fine":"No",res);
            if(res == -111)
                    break;
    }
    return 0;
    }
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Sorry, but how does this answer the question? –  Mysticial Mar 15 at 21:53
    
Sorry, but I am using mobile phone.It is not easy to code.I think it is just an explanation(maybe too short,:-)) to the function. –  lessmoon Mar 15 at 21:58
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  user1981275 Mar 15 at 22:47
    
I will post my code soon…Thanks for your remind. –  lessmoon Mar 15 at 22:54

protected by Mysticial Mar 15 at 21:52

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