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I'm currently working on refactoring some old code and I found a snippet where I don't understand how to properly use Generics for the Swing Application Framework class TaskListener.Adapter.

This is the relevant code snippet:

public void executeTask(Task<?, ?> task, boolean handleException) {
    task.addTaskListener(new TaskListener.Adapter() { /* <-- Two warnings here */
        @Override
        public void failed(TaskEvent event) { /* ... */ }
    });
    getContext().getTaskService().execute(task);
}

1. First I want to get rid of the warnings. "unchecked conversion" and "found raw type". I tried to change the code to new TaskListener.Adapter<Object, Object>, but then I get the error "cannot be applied to given types". Is a raw type the only thing I can use here because of the (Task<?, ?> declaration?

2. The declaration of the failed method in org.jdesktop.application.TaskListener.Adapter is public void failed(TaskEvent<Throwable> event), but if I try to change my code to this:

@Override
public void failed(TaskEvent<Throwable> event) { /* ... */ }

I get "method does not override a method from a supertype". Again I have to go with the raw TaskEvent. Why is that?

Thank you for your help.

EDIT: Javadoc for TaskListener on Jarvana.

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1  
Could you post the declaration of TaskListener.Adapter, specifically its generic parameters? – Péter Török Aug 11 '11 at 8:13
    
I added a link to Javadocs of the class. (It's a standard Swing Application Framework class.) – Daniel Rikowski Aug 11 '11 at 8:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't apply an adapter genericised as <Object, Object> to a Task<?, ?> because who knows what the wildcards are? It could be a Task<String, Integer> in which case the adapter's bounds wouldn't match and so it wouldn't be applicable.

(Well, it might be that in this case they are OK because they're consumers, but the compiler can't infer that by itself. If this is the case, then Task.addTaskListener needs to be declared to take a TaskListener<? super T, ? super V> in order to satisfy the compiler.)

Because of the way the addTaskListener is declared, you need to pass in a listener with the exact same generic bounds. And this is impossible when you declare them as wildcards, since you have no way to refer back to them later. What you need to do instead is make the method generic, which is similar to using ? wildcards except you're giving them names so you can refer to them later on in the method:

public <T, V> void executeTask(Task<T, V> task, boolean handleException) {
    task.addTaskListener(new TaskListener.Adapter<T, V>() {
        @Override
        public void failed(TaskEvent event) { /* ... */ }
    });
    getContext().getTaskService().execute(task);
}

As for the second part, I have no idea - it looks fine to me as well. Perhaps this is some misleading error that comes from the raw types, although that seems unlikely since neither generic parameter is involved in the declaration at all. If the compiler still doesn't like the override after the above changes, then perhaps the problem is somewhere else (like you've accidentally placed the method in the wrong class' scope, etc.)

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1  
Adding the Generic parameters to my method allows me to use <Throwable>. Weird... I can't see how those two things are related. – Daniel Rikowski Aug 11 '11 at 9:39
    
@DR Me neither; maybe the compiler throws a strop at the raw type and so decides that it'll ignore generic bounds throughout the class. It's quite feasibly a bug in Sun's javac, I've encountered a few which are generics-related, especially when dealing with more "interesting" situations. – Andrzej Doyle Aug 11 '11 at 9:43
1  
@DR, the reason is exactly what I tried to explain in my answer below. – Péter Török Aug 11 '11 at 10:04

Not knowing the library and the source code, here's my guess:

public <K, V> void executeTask(final Task<K, V> task, boolean handleException) {
    task.addTaskListener(new TaskListener.Adapter<K, V>() {
        @Override
        public void failed(final TaskEvent<Throwable> event) {
            super.failed(event);
        }
    });
    getContext().getTaskService().execute(task);
}

(Edit: I downloaded the lib and the above code compiles without warning)

share|improve this answer
  1. Have you tried new TaskListener.Adapter<?, ?> ?

  2. When you tried to add the <Throwable> type parameter, was your new TaskListener.Adapter created as a raw type, or did it have generic type parameters?

    In the first case, what happens is that the compiler treats the whole class (and its superclass too) as a raw type (for backward compatibility). That is, all generic type parameters within the class, regardless of whether these are class- or method-specific, are omitted. So when it finds your method declaration with a generic parameter, it is compared against a superclass method with a raw parameter. Hence, no match.

share|improve this answer
    
new TaskListener.Adapter<?, ?> that wouldn't work. The compiler has no way to know that these question marks match what the outer question mark matches. – Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 11 '11 at 8:38
    
1. Yes, but only out of despair :). It can't work (See @Seans comment) 2. TaskListener.Adapter has generic parameters, but that specific method doesn't use them, it explicitly uses Throwable. – Daniel Rikowski Aug 11 '11 at 9:30
    
@DR, in the case I described above, the compiler throws away all generic type parameters in the class, regardless of whether these are class- or method-specific. – Péter Török Aug 11 '11 at 10:03
    
@Sean, I was under the impression the OP can't change the signature of executeTask. If he can, of course it is best to do it the way you and Andrzej describe. – Péter Török Aug 11 '11 at 10:06
    
@Péter Török: if it is the case that the OP can't change the signature (where does it say that?), then he can make a wrapper method, that takes <?,?> and then passes it onto a private method declared with <T,V> like the other people said – newacct Aug 11 '11 at 10:50

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