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I have a collection of objects (lets call them MyItem) and each MyItem has a method called IsCompatibleWith which returns a boolean saying whether it's compatible with another MyItem.

public class MyItem
{
    ...
    public bool IsCompatibleWith(MyItem other) { ... }
    ...
}

A.IsCompatibleWith(B) will always be the same as B.IsCompatibleWith(A). If for example I have a collection containing 4 of these, I am trying to find a LINQ query that will run the method on each distinct pair of items in the same collection. So if my collection contains A, B, C and D I wish to do the equivalent of:

A.IsCompatibleWith(B); // A & B
A.IsCompatibleWith(C); // A & C
A.IsCompatibleWith(D); // A & D
B.IsCompatibleWith(C); // B & C
B.IsCompatibleWith(D); // B & D
C.IsCompatibleWith(D); // C & D

The code initially used was:

var result = from item in myItems
             from other in myItems
             where item != other && 
                   item.IsCompatibleWith(other)
             select item;

but of course this will still do both A & B and B & A (which is not required and not efficient). Also it's probably worth noting that in reality these lists will be a lot bigger than 4 items, hence the desire for an optimal solution.

Hopefully this makes sense... any ideas?

Edit: One possible query -

MyItem[] items = myItems.ToArray();
bool compatible = (from item in items
                   from other in items
                   where
                       Array.IndexOf(items, item) < Array.IndexOf(items, other) &&
                       !item.IsCompatibleWith(other)
                   select item).FirstOrDefault() == null;

Edit2: In the end switched to using the custom solution from LukeH as it was more efficient for bigger lists.

public bool AreAllCompatible()
{
    using (var e = myItems.GetEnumerator())
    {
        var buffer = new List<MyItem>();
        while (e.MoveNext())
        {
            if (buffer.Any(item => !item.IsCompatibleWith(e.Current)))
                return false;
            buffer.Add(e.Current);
        }
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this question
    
The item != other will short circuit the && so the item.IsCompatibleWith(other) is not called on the same ones no? –  Preet Sangha Aug 11 '11 at 9:02
    
That bit is fine, it's the fact that the code above will do the following comparisons: A & B | A & C | A & D | B & A (Already done once) | B & C | B & D | C & A (Already done once) | C & B (Already done once) | C & D | D & A (Already done once) | D & B (Already done once) | D & C (Already done once) –  Robert Davey Aug 11 '11 at 9:08
    
Are you aware that your final query is much less efficient than your original? –  LukeH Aug 11 '11 at 9:58
    
If A IsCompatibleWith B and B IsCompatibleWith C is it true that C IsCompatibleWith A? –  Jodrell Aug 11 '11 at 10:00
    
@LukeH: Is it? IsCompatibleWith takes a lot of time to run so I thought the sacrifice on the IndexOf was better than running IsCompatibleWith multiple times unnecessarily. –  Robert Davey Aug 11 '11 at 10:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit...

Judging by the "final query" added to your question, you need a method to determine if all the items in the collection are compatible with each other. Here's how to do it reasonably efficiently:

bool compatible = myItems.AreAllItemsCompatible();

// ...

public static bool AreAllItemsCompatible(this IEnumerable<MyItem> source)
{
    using (var e = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        var buffer = new List<MyItem>();

        while (e.MoveNext())
        {
            foreach (MyItem item in buffer)
            {
                if (!item.IsCompatibleWith(e.Current))
                    return false;
            }
            buffer.Add(e.Current);
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Original Answer...

I don't think there's an efficient way to do this using only the built-in LINQ methods.

It's easy enough to build your own though. Here's an example of the sort of code you'll need. I'm not sure exactly what results you're trying to return so I'm just writing a message to the console for each compatible pair. It should be easy enough to change it to yield the results that you need.

using (var e = myItems.GetEnumerator())
{
    var buffer = new List<MyItem>();

    while (e.MoveNext())
    {
        foreach (MyItem item in buffer)
        {
            if (item.IsCompatibleWith(e.Current))
            {
                Console.WriteLine(item + " is compatible with " + e.Current);
            }
        }
        buffer.Add(e.Current);
    }
}

(Note that although this is reasonably efficient, it does not preserve the original ordering of the collection. Is that an issue in your situation?)

share|improve this answer

this should do it:

var result = from item in myItems
         from other in myItems
         where item != other && 
               myItems.indexOf(item) < myItems.indexOf(other) &&
               item.IsCompatibleWith(other)
         select item;

But i dont know if it makes it faster, because in the query has to check the indices of the rows each row.

Edit: if you have an index in myItem you should use that one instead of indexOf. And you can remove the "item != other" from the where clause, little bit redundant now

share|improve this answer
1  
This will only select items compatible with the items after them in myItems, not the ones compatible with every other. Moreover, you can get the index of the element in the enumeration alongside the element with the Enumerable.Select<TSource, TResult>(IEnumerable<TSource>, Func<TSource, Int32, TResult>) overload. You don't have to call IndexOf. –  Falanwe Aug 11 '11 at 9:31

Here's an idea:

Implement IComparable so that your MyItem becomes sortable, then run this linq-query:

var result = from item in myItems
             from other in myItems
             where item.CompareTo(other) < 0 && 
                   item.IsCompatibleWith(other)
             select item;
share|improve this answer
    
We may run into problems with this approach as it's possible the data in A and B will be identical, so it may end up skipping them. There isn't any data on the object we can use to ensure CompareTo will always sort them in the same order. –  Robert Davey Aug 11 '11 at 9:25

If your MyItem collection is small enough, you can storage the results of item.IsCompatibleWith(otherItem) in a boolean array:

var itemCount = myItems.Count();
var compatibilityTable = new bool[itemCount, itemCount];

var itemsToCompare = new List<MyItem>();
var i = 0;
var j = 0;
foreach (var item in  myItems)
{
    j = 0;
    foreach (var other in itemsToCompare)
    {
        compatibilityTable[i,j] = item.IsCompatibleWith(other);
        compatibilityTable[j,i] = compatibilityTable[i,j];
        j++;
    }
    itemsToCompare.Add(item);
    i++;
}

var result = myItems.Where((item, i) =>
                     {
                         var compatible = true;
                         var j = 0;
                         while (compatible && j < itemCount)
                         {
                             compatible = compatibilityTable[i,j];
                         }
                         j++;
                         return compatible;
                     }
share|improve this answer

So, we have

IEnumerable<MyItem> MyItems;

To get all the combinations we could use a function like this.

//returns all the k sized combinations from a list
public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Combinations<T>(IEnumerable<T> list,
                                                          int k)
{
    if (k == 0) return new[] {new T[0]};

    return list.SelectMany((l, i) =>
        Combinations(list.Skip(i + 1), k - 1).Select(c => (new[] {l}).Concat(c))
    );
}

We can then apply this function to our problem like this.

var combinations = Combinations(MyItems, 2).Select(c => c.ToList<MyItem>());
var result = combinations.Where(c => c[0].IsCompatibleWith(c[1]))

This will perform IsCompatableWith on all the combinations without repetition.

You could of course perform the the checking inside the Combinations functions. For further work you could make the Combinations function into an extention that takes a delegate with a variable number of parameters for several lengths of k.

EDIT: As I suggested above, if you wrote these extension method

public static class Extenesions
{
    IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Combinations<T>(this IEnumerable<T> list, int k)
    {
        if (k == 0) return new[] { new T[0] };

        return list.SelectMany((l, i) =>
            list.Skip(i + 1).Combinations<T>(k - 1)
                .Select(c => (new[] { l }).Concat(c)));
    }

    IEnumerable<Tuple<T, T>> Combinations<T> (this IEnumerable<T> list, 
                                                 Func<T, T, bool> filter)
    {
        return list.Combinations(2).Where(c =>
            filter(c.First(), c.Last())).Select(c => 
                Tuple.Create<T, T>(c.First(), c.Last()));

    }
}

Then in your code you could do the rather more elegant (IMO)

var compatibleTuples = myItems.Combinations(a, b) => a.IsCompatibleWith(b)))

then get at the compatible items with

foreach(var t in compatibleTuples)
{
    t.Item1 // or T.item2
}
share|improve this answer

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