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Here's the documentation for this plugin (There's only two functions.) http://tkyk.github.com/jquery-history-plugin/#documentation

$(document).ready(function() {
    function load(num) {
        $('#content').load(num +".html");
    }

    $.history.init(function(url) {
        load(url == "" ? "1" : url);
    });

    $('#ajax-links a').live('click', function(e) {
        var url = $(this).attr('href');
        url = url.replace(/^.*#/, '');
        $.history.load(url);
        return false;
    });
});

Here's the html:

<body>
  <h1>jQuery History Plugin Ajax Sample</h1>
  <div id="ajax-links">
    <ul>
      <li><a href="#1">load 1.html</a></li>
      <li><a href="#2">load 2.html</a></li>
      <li><a href="#3">load 3.html</a></li>
    </ul>
    <div id="content"></div>
    <hr />
  </div>
  <p>[<a href="../">All samples</a>] [<a href="http://github.com/tkyk/jquery-history-plugin">Project home</a>]</p>
</body>
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
load(url == "" ? "1" : url);

The question mark here is a a ternary if operation, Simply put, it is a short, inline if statement.

Expanded out, the statement would look something like this:

if (url == "")
    load("1");
else
    load(url);

If the statement before the question mark evaluates to true, then the left-hand side of the colon is used, otherwise (if it is false) the right-hand side is used. You can also nest this, though it isn't always a good idea (for readability).

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You're good, thanks again –  user784637 Aug 11 '11 at 9:09
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Its shorthand for:

If (url == ""){
   load("1");
}
else {
   load(url);
}

Ie. If url equals "" then return "1", otherwise, return url

In your example, if the url equals "" then, 1.html will be loaded, otherwise, url + ".html" will be loaded

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So those are the return values? I can read it just like you posted, but can you give me the pseudo code? –  user784637 Aug 11 '11 at 9:02
    
I'm confused, wouldn't the proper syntax be to include the word "return"? –  user784637 Aug 11 '11 at 9:05
    
It's called a ternary operator and is basically a shorthand method for a conditional statement - more info at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ternary_operation –  simnom Aug 11 '11 at 9:05
    
Why the downvote? –  Curt Aug 11 '11 at 9:08
    
I upvoted just to let you know –  user784637 Aug 11 '11 at 9:10
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It is a ternary operation.

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OMG!!! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!! I GET IT, THAT LINK SOLVED ALL MY PROBLEMS! –  user784637 Aug 11 '11 at 9:07
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