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In reference to Steve McConnell's Code Complete and its reference to "Programming into a language" versus "Programming in a language" (see this blog entry by Jon Skeet if you don't have the book handy), I would like to know your favorite/best examples of where you programmed into a language. I'll include my own for good measure.

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...reviewing community wiki info to determine if this matches up... I think it does, but it seems like the whole community wiki thing itself is controversial... I'll ponder this and come back to review later. Perhaps others will make up my mind for me ;-) –  Dan Coates Mar 31 '09 at 18:51
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4 Answers

I recently had to implement (as a proof of concept) a finite state machine in RPG II. This isn't a natural match (to say the least) but by doing exactly what McConnell suggests, the code was reasonably straight forward:

C*
C*            Factor 1  Op   Factor 2  Result           Comments
C*
C* -----------State 0 --------------------------------------------
C*
C             STATE     IFEQ 0
C             CURCHAR   CASLT'0'       REJECT
C             CURCHAR   CASGT'9'       REJECT
C                       CAS            STATE=1
C                       END
C                       ELSE
C*
C* -----------State 1 --------------------------------------------
C*
C             STATE     IFEQ 1
C             CURCHAR   CASLT'.'       STATE=2
C             CURCHAR   CASLT'0'       ACCEPT
C             CURCHAR   CASGT'9'       ACCEPT
C                       END
C                       ELSE
C*
C* -----------State 2 --------------------------------------------
C*
C             STATE     IFEQ 2
C             CURCHAR   CASLT'0'       REJECT
C             CURCHAR   CASGT'9'       REJECT
C                       CAS            STATE=3
C                       END
C                       ELSE
C*
C* -----------State 3 --------------------------------------------
C*
C             STATE     IFEQ 3
C             CURCHAR   CASLT'0'       ACCEPT
C             CURCHAR   CASGT'9'       ACCEPT
C                       END
C                       ELSE
C*
C* ----------------------------------------------------------------
C*
C                       END                             End for state 3
C                       END                             End for state 2
C                       END                             End for state 1
C                       END                             End for state 0
C*
C* ----------------------------------------------------------------
C*
C             STATE=1   BEGSR
C                       Z-ADD1         STATE
C                       ENDSR
C*
C             STATE=2   BEGSR
C                       Z-ADD2         STATE
C                       ENDSR
C*
C             STATE=3   BEGSR
C                       Z-ADD3         STATE
C                       ENDSR
C*
C             ACCEPT    BEGSR
C                       ENDSR
C*
C             REJECT    BEGSR
C                       ENDSR

The key was breaking the problem into two parts: figure out what you want to express, and then figure out how best to express it in the target language. I fear a pure RPG II style solution would have been an utter mess.

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My current favorite example of this is for VB/ASP.NET web projects. I hate massive "if" statements in the page load and then trying to figure out the logic on postbacks. Therefore, I have created a convention to separate code that loads on first requests, post backs, and a section for both. Applying this to all aspx.vb files helps me keep sane regarding this. I put this code in even if the subs are empty, as it makes it extremely easy to alter the code later.

Protected Sub Page_Load(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Me.Load
    If IsPostBack Then
        handlePostBack(sender, e)
    Else
        handleFirstTimeHere(sender, e)
    End If

    ' do this regardless

End Sub

Private Sub handlePostBack(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs)
    ' stuff to do on postbacks
End Sub

Private Sub handleFirstTimeHere(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs)
    ' stuff to do on non postbacks
End Sub
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This seems pretty useless, honestly. I don't see how it makes it any easier to alter the code when all you have done is move the programming from one spot in your file to another. If anything it would make it harder because you have to jump around more to find the logic. –  TheTXI Mar 31 '09 at 18:29
    
small blocks of code = easier to understand. easier to understand = harder to get wrong and easier to test. Also allowes for better scoping of variables. –  TofuBeer Mar 31 '09 at 18:31
    
I agree with these comments, but here's why I did it: It's hard to determine the nominal path thru the code, and thus, devs write it differently. Some use ispostback because it's a positive test, some use not ispostback because non pb's come first. This saves you the agony of figuring that out. –  Dan Coates Mar 31 '09 at 18:42
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I missed the concepts of Blocks (from Smalltalk) in Java and went through a phase where I did something like this (this general type of back in JDK 1.1, updated for generics):

interface Block<T>
{
    void perform(T data);
}

public class Main
{
    public static void main(final String[] argv)
    {
        final ForEach<Integer> each;
        final List<Integer>    values;

        each   = new ForEach<Integer>();
        values = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        each.iterate(values,
                     new Block<Integer>()
                     {
                        public void perform(final Integer data)
                        {
                            System.out.println(data);
                        }
        });
    }
}

class ForEach<T>
{
    public void iterate(final Iterable<T> values,
                        final Block<T>      block)
    {
        for(final T value : values)
        {
            block.perform(value);
        }
    }
}
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This is probably one of the most useless things I've programmed, but here it is:

This is a documented, unit tested PHP implementation of Ruby's Enumerable mixin. All methods (except .entries and .to_set) listed here are implemented: ruby-doc.org::Enumerable

The motivation for doing this came from this StackOverflow question, "How can I use PHP closures like ruby blocks?". This class emulates ruby blocks using anonymous functions, and it's more a proof of concept than anything else.

Source code and examples available here.

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