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In trying to answer this question I came up with the following code:

#include <string>
#include <iostream> 
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

class Sizes
{
public:
    void operator() ( std::vector<int> v ) { 
        sizeVec.push_back( v.size() );  
    }
    std::vector<int> sizeVec;
};

void outFunc (int i) {
    std::cout << " " << i;
}
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::vector<std::vector<int>> twodVec;

    std::vector<int> vec;
    vec.push_back( 6 );
    twodVec.push_back( vec );
    vec.push_back( 3 );
    twodVec.push_back( vec );
    vec.push_back( 8 );
    twodVec.push_back( vec );
    vec.push_back( 3 );
    twodVec.push_back( vec );

    Sizes sizes;
    std::for_each( twodVec.begin(), twodVec.end(), sizes );
    std::for_each( sizes.sizeVec.begin(), sizes.sizeVec.end(), outFunc );

    return 0;
}

Debugging this shows Sizes::operator() being called and the size of sizeVec increasing with each call as expected. However when the second std::foreach is called the sizeVec is empty... I've created a work around involving passing a vector into Sizes but does anyone know what's going on

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

std::for_each takes a functor by value, not by reference, so the original object is unaffected. You need to do:

sizes = std::for_each( twodVec.begin(), twodVec.end(), sizes );
share|improve this answer
    
Even better, though, is to leave the state outside the function call, since (almost?) all of the algorithms require functors be arbitrarily copyable anyway. –  GManNickG Aug 11 '11 at 10:24
    
@GMan: for_each is the exception to the rule, though. It's explicitly designed to be used this way. "Leaving the state outside the function call" makes re-entrancy tricky. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 11 '11 at 10:26
1  
Thanks Oli, I'd forgotten about this. As as extra for anyone seeing this who has boost, you can use Boost.Ref to simplify this further. –  Patrick Aug 11 '11 at 10:37
1  
@GMan: Yes, that makes sense. But I'd have to ask: why bother? Semantically, this is virtually identical to having the state inside the functor. Either way, the observable behaviour of the functor changes over time, and the order in which it's invoked on the container is important. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 11 '11 at 10:47
1  
I would put the vector outside the Size class (and pass it in as a reference). this has two extra benefits. 1) You do not copy the vector as the functor is passed into for_each. 2) It makes the call to for_each() more intuitive as the operator() is now const and you don;t need a separate variable (just a temporary). –  Loki Astari Aug 11 '11 at 11:01

The code snippets shown below are quoted from your code as it was when I wrote this.

#include <string>
#include <iostream> 
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

class Sizes
{
public:
    void operator() ( std::vector<int> v ) { 

v is passed by value, which can be pretty inefficient! Pass it by reference.


        sizeVec.push_back( v.size() );  
    }
    std::vector<int> sizeVec;
};

void outFunc (int i) {
    std::cout << " " << i;
}
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])

_tmain has never been a valid form of main.

This code will, at best, only compile with Microsoft's compiler.

Also, _tmain has no purpose even with Microsoft's compiler, except for one special case when targeting Windows 9x (not even for targeting Windows 9x in general).

Why are you writing more in order to render your code non-standard and ungrokkable for non-Windows programmers?

Use standard main.


{
    std::vector<std::vector<int>> twodVec;

The >> will probably compile with most modern compilers, due to their support for the upcoming C++0x. But in C++98/C++03 it is invalid. So, still, for portable code write > > (note the space).


    std::vector<int> vec;
    vec.push_back( 6 );
    twodVec.push_back( vec );
    vec.push_back( 3 );
    twodVec.push_back( vec );
    vec.push_back( 8 );
    twodVec.push_back( vec );
    vec.push_back( 3 );
    twodVec.push_back( vec );

    Sizes sizes;
    std::for_each( twodVec.begin(), twodVec.end(), sizes );

sizes can be freely copied here, and is in fact passed by value.

However, std::for_each returns a copy of the final result.

You can assign that back to sizes, even if it is a quite inefficient way of doing things when the functor contains a vector.


    std::for_each( sizes.sizeVec.begin(), sizes.sizeVec.end(), outFunc );

    return 0;

This final return 0; is not necessary with a standard main, since it only expresses the default return value for standard main.


}

Cheers & hth.

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I feel that most of this should be probably written in comments, as it obscures your answer to the question itself. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 11 '11 at 10:37
    
@Oli: SO comments do not support code presentation. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 11 '11 at 10:42
    
@Alf: I wrote this in VS 2008 which automatically creates the _tmain and the return 0 lines, why would I change it? Good point about passing the the vector by reference though. –  Patrick Aug 11 '11 at 11:00

I would do a couple of things differently:

// (1) struct rather than class for functor (as it contains no state).
struct Sizes
{
    // (2) Keep a reference to the vector
    std::vector<int>&    sizeVec;

    Sizes(std::vector<int>& sizeVec): sizeVec(sizeVec) {}

    // (3) The functor can now be const as the the state is external
    void operator() ( std::vector<int> const& v ) const
    {                              //  ^^^^^^  (4) Pass parameter by const reference
                                   //              This avoids an unnecessary copy.
        sizeVec.push_back( v.size() );  
    }
};

std::for_each( twodVec.begin(), twodVec.end(), Sizes(vec) );
                                         //    ^^^^^^^^^^  Call using temporary
                                         //                No need for a Size variable.

Your second for_each and outFunc() can be replaced with some standard objects:

std::copy(sizes.sizeVec.begin(),
          sizes.sizeVec.end(),
          std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " ")
         );

A secondary though more obscure note, By keeping state out of the Sizes object makes it easier to convert to C++0x lambda when this arrives next year:

std::for_each( twodVec.begin(), twodVec.end(), Sizes(vec) );

// becomes

std::for_each( twodVec.begin(),
               twodVec.end(), 
               [&vec] ( std::vector<int> const& v ) {  vec.push_back(v.size()); }
             );
share|improve this answer
    
I am wondering as to the use of a temporary object vec in your call to for_each. The purpose of the OP was to obtain an object (a vector) that holds the sizes of the twodVec. With vec being temporary this information would be lost after the call to for_each, wouldn't it? –  janitor048 Aug 12 '11 at 13:02
    
@janitor048: Named objects can not be temporaries (by definition). What I have done is move the vector out of the Sizes class and put within the scope of the calling class (as a named variable vec). The reason is that the third parameter to for_each() is passed by value and this causes a copy of the third value to be generated (and potentially generated in each iteration of the loop). This would cause all internal member to be copied and copying a vector can be expensive. By moving the vector out of the object I remove this cost. Also having functors with state IMO is usually a flawed –  Loki Astari Aug 12 '11 at 13:59
    
Ah, I see, I missed that vec has been declared within the scope of the calling class. Thanks for the clarification. Indeed I tested (I'm the OP of the post that has been refered to) the OP's version and found poor performance. I'll try yours.. –  janitor048 Aug 12 '11 at 19:17

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