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I can't cast one anonymous type to another. And I wonder why.

public static class Class1{
    public static object GetFinance(Guid contractB2CId)
    {
        return new
        {
         Item1 = reader.ValueOrDefault<decimal>(0),
         Item2 = reader.ValueOrDefault<decimal>(1),
         Item3 = reader.ValueOrDefault<decimal>(2),
         Item4 = reader.ValueOrDefault<decimal>(3),
         Item5 = reader.ValueOrDefault<decimal>(4),
         Item6 = reader.ValueOrDefault<decimal>(5)
       };
    }


     object obj = GetFinance();
     var financeInfo = obj.UnsafeCast(new
       {
           Item1 = default(decimal),
           Item2 = default(decimal),
           Item3 = default(decimal),
           Item4 = default(decimal),
           Item5 = default(decimal),
           Item6 = default(decimal)


       });

 } 

     public static class Class2{                                               
     public static T UnsafeCast<T>(this object obj, T type)
     {
       return (T) obj;
     }
} 

The exception

Unable to cast object of type '<>f__AnonymousType16[System.Decimal,System.Decimal,System.Decimal,System.Decimal,System.Decimal,System.Decimal]' to type '<>f__AnonymousType06[System.Decimal,System.Decimal,System.Decimal,System.Decimal,System.Decimal,System.Decimal]'.

enter image description here

UPDATE: is there any way to avoid this exception except using Tuple<decimal.....> or using one assembly?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Anonymous types are bound to the assembly (technically, the module) that they are declared in. My guess is that this code is in different assemblies. Thus they are completely different types that happen to look similar.

Note that dynamically generated code (ASP.NET pages etc) will be in a different assembly.

By the way, this trick is called "cast by example", and it works fine (just tested it) as long as the types are in the same assembly.

Here it is working, because it is all in one assembly:

static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        object obj = GetFinance();
        var financeInfo = obj.UnsafeCast(new
        {
            Item1 = default(decimal), Item2 = default(decimal),
            Item3 = default(decimal), Item4 = default(decimal),
            Item5 = default(decimal), Item6 = default(decimal)
        });
        System.Console.WriteLine(financeInfo.Item3); // 76
    }
    public static object GetFinance()
    {
        decimal x = 76;
        return new
        {
            Item1 = x, Item2 = x, Item3 = x,
            Item4 = x, Item5 = x, Item6 = x
        };
    }

    public static T UnsafeCast<T>(this object obj, T type)
    {
        return (T)obj;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
My code is in differenst assemblies. I think it is the reason of the exception. –  Alexandre Aug 11 '11 at 11:43
    
if the types are in the same assembly the cast is redundant so yes that will work. But unless you are casting to object or an otherwise redundant cast (casting to the same type) you will have no luck using cast on anonymous types –  Rune FS Aug 11 '11 at 11:46
1  
@Alex if it is in different assemblies, I know it is the reason. Type-equivalence for anonymous types only works in the same assembly. Consider using a named type - perhaps Tuple.Create(...) etc –  Marc Gravell Aug 11 '11 at 11:46
    
@RuneFS - if it is the return type from a method, it can only be exposed as object. So casting it back isn't really redundant, as that is the only way to get it back typed. And it will work fine, as shown above. However, cast-by-example is horribly brittle at the best of times, and I don't recommend it ;p –  Marc Gravell Aug 11 '11 at 11:49
    
@Marc you are of course right. I forgot that scenario because I would kill any one on my team doing so :p but yes you are right there's a third possible scenario that will work –  Rune FS Aug 11 '11 at 11:51

As you can tell from the error message, the compiler has generated 2 distinct types. f__AnonymousType1 and f__AnonymousType0. And they are in no way related.

The fact that they contain (exactly) the same properties is a coincidence, the compiler will not cast between two 'same' types. They have to be related.

The same problem without Anonymous Types:

class A1
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

class A2
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}


   A1 a = new A1();
   A2 b = (A2) a;    // error 

Error 1 Cannot convert type 'MyApp.A1' to 'MyApp.A2'

But if you are using C#4, do take a look at Tuple<T1,T2,T3,T4,T5,T6>. It should let you do the same thing or at least something similar.

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In the language spec it is fully stated that two anonymous types with the same names and types in the same order will be the same type, unless (see my answer) ;p –  Marc Gravell Aug 11 '11 at 11:28
1  
No, I disagree; it is a different problem. Cast-by-example works fine, within certain constraints. It isn't a good idea, but it works. –  Marc Gravell Aug 11 '11 at 11:31
    
OK, I didn't investigate why they are different types. You're probably right about different assemblies. –  Henk Holterman Aug 11 '11 at 11:37

These are technically 2 completely separate classes. You can't just cast between 2 classes because they look like each other. For the language, it would be equally impossible as trying to convert a double to a button. If you use c# 4.0 I would suggest using the generic Tuple class, making everything typed. If not, write your own little class to use.

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If they were in the same assembly they would be the same type (guaranteed in the C# spec) - the expectation isn't unreasonable here, simply one of the caveats hasn't been met. –  Marc Gravell Aug 11 '11 at 11:33

if you look at the exception you'll see they are two different types. One does not derive from the other.

The specifications says:

An anonymous type is a nameless class type that inherits directly from object An anonymous type is a nameless class type that inherits directly from object. The members of an anonymous type are a sequence of read/write properties inferred from the object initializer(s) used to create instances of the type. Specifically. Within the same program, two anonymous object initializers that specify a sequence of properties of the same names and types in the same order will produce instances of the same anonymous type

Taken from the error message you have to different types that both derive from object. So why would you expect to be able to cast from one to the other?

if you had

class foo<T1,T2,T3,T4,T5,T6>{
T1 Item1
T2 Item2
T3 Item3
T4 Item4
T5 Item5
T6 Item6
}

and

class Bar<T1,T2,T3,T4,T5,T6>{
T1 Item1
T2 Item2
T3 Item3
T4 Item4
T5 Item5
T6 Item6
}

would you also expect to be able to cast between those two?

the only difference is the name of the types. Mine are called Foo and Bar yours <>f_AnonymousType1 and <>f_AnonymousType0

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1  
"why do you think..." - how about because the language spec formally states that (within certain bounds) this is guaranteed to work. The expectation is not unreasonable - simply, the constraints haven't been met. –  Marc Gravell Aug 11 '11 at 11:32
1  
@Marc Gravel You might be right as I remember the specs they say that with in specific bounds the generated type will be the same not deriving from one another or convertiable to one another. I've I remember incorrect I would love a ref to the spec if you have. On that assumption seeing that the two types are not the same (which of course would make "casting" possible) I stated my question –  Rune FS Aug 11 '11 at 11:37
    
well, this comes close: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… "Within the same program, two anonymous object initializers that specify a sequence of properties of the same names and types in the same order will produce instances of the same anonymous type. (This definition includes the order of the properties because it is observable and material in certain circumstances, such as reflection.)" - this isn't the spec doc though; in reality, "program" should read "assembly" –  Marc Gravell Aug 11 '11 at 11:40
    
@Marc you that's the same source as I found. From the error message it's evident that either the types are from two different assemblies or maybe there's something wrong with the univers (blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/04/25/…) my money are on two assemblies –  Rune FS Aug 11 '11 at 11:48

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