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I am trying to build gdb for armv6 architecture. I will be compiling this package on a Fedora Linux-Intel x86 box. I read the process of installing the gdb, like

  1. Download the source pachage

  2. run configure -host

  3. make

But I got lost in the process because I was not able to make out what will be the host, target, needed for the configure script.

I need to basically be able to debug programs running on armv6 architecture board which runs linux kernel 2.6.21.5-cfs-v19. The gdb executable which I intend to obtain after compilation of the source also needs to be able to run on above mentioned configuration.

Now to get a working gdb executable for this configuration what steps should I follow?

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3 Answers 3

We (www.rockbox.org) use the arm target for a whole batch of our currently working DAPS. The target we specify is usually arm-elf, rather than arm-linux.

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Be careful with arm-linux vs. arm-elf, eg.

We sometimes say arm-elf is for "bare metal". Unfortunately there's another "bare metal" target arm-eabi and no one knows what the difference between these two exactly is.

BTW,

The gdb executable which i intend to obtain after compilation of the source,also needs to be able to run on above mentioned configuration.

Really? Running GDB on an ARM board may be quite slow. I recommend you either of

  1. Remote debugging of the ARM board from an x86 PC
  2. Saving a memory core on the ARM board, transferring it to an x86 PC and then inspecting it there

Cf.

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"2. Saving a memory core on the ARM board, transferring it to an x86 PC and then inspecting it there" won't he/she need to also transfer all the libraries that the application uses included libc? Otherwise the backtrace could be entirely random? –  bruce.banner Feb 8 '12 at 20:25
    
Yes, personally I like the cross-debootstrap tool on Debian which can create a complete file system hierarchy for an ARM device on my x86 development machine. But I suppose similar tools are available for other Linux distros. By googling "arm chroot" I found several possible alternatives like wiki.meego.com/ARM/chroot blog.coralic.nl/2010/08/12/… –  nodakai Feb 9 '12 at 0:26

target/host is usually the target tool chain you would be using (mostly arm-linux)

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