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The following SQL query:

SELECT messages.id, messages.created_at, comments.created_at FROM messages
LEFT JOIN comments ON comments.message_id = messages.id 
WHERE (messages.id IN (429,443)) 
ORDER BY GREATEST(messages.created_at, comments.created_at) DESC

returns:

 id         messages.created_at     comments.created_at
--------------------------------------------------------
 443                2                       5
 429                1                       4
 443                2                       3

 (I replaced dates with numbers for readability)

To get each id only once I added DISTINCT:

SELECT DISTINCT messages.id FROM messages
LEFT JOIN comments ON comments.message_id = messages.id 
WHERE (messages.id IN (429,443)) 
ORDER BY GREATEST(messages.created_at, comments.created_at) DESC

But, in the result the id values changed order:

id
---
429
443

What could be the reason for that ?

How could I keep the order ?

share|improve this question
1  
My guess is that mysql stops after it finds the first two matches and orders them accordingly. Likely the last two entries are being found first because they were inserted first judging by your use of created_at. –  Jrod Aug 11 '11 at 13:00
    
I'm not sure, but you don't really know which of the rows you retain after the distinct. I'm not sure how mysql does that. It would be interesting to see you run both queries and include both created_at columns. –  Narnian Aug 11 '11 at 13:00
1  
SELECT messages.id, messages.created_at, comments.created_at so we can see the values of the other columns since that is what you are ordering by. I'm guessing that the created_at for 429 is higher than the created_at for 443 –  Hunter McMillen Aug 11 '11 at 13:01
    
I updated the question. –  Misha Moroshko Aug 11 '11 at 13:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

the distinct key word is doing what it's supposed to do, return one row each with a given column value. Distinct doesn't allow you to specify which such row will be returned, and it's clear from the original query that such an ordering is allowed (there is a row with id 443 that follows a row with id 429).

To take control of what rows will be returned, you need to reformulate the query. A typical solution I'll take is to use a group by, selecting the group column and the desired row from each group, something to the effect of

SELECT message.id, MAX(message.created_at) FROM message GROUP BY message.id;

If I need to do more, I'll use this sort of query as a subselect in a larger query, possibly joining on the id field to get more fields from the preferred row, Or ordering the query in a particular way.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Indeed, GROUP BY seems a reasonable approach here. –  Misha Moroshko Aug 11 '11 at 14:07

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