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I'm trying to add methods dynamically from external files. Right now I have __call method in my class so when i call the method I want, __call includes it for me; the problem is I want to call loaded function by using my class, and I don't want loaded function outside of the class;

Class myClass
{
    function__call($name, $args)
    {
        require_once($name.".php");
    }
}

echoA.php:

function echoA()
{
    echo("A");
}

then i want to use it like:

$myClass = new myClass();
$myClass->echoA();

Any advice will be appreciated.

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From the php manual: "...All functions and classes in PHP have the global scope...". So at least: "...and I don't want loaded function outside of the class;..." will not be possible. –  Yoshi Aug 11 '11 at 13:19
    
This sounds like a bad idea... –  deceze Aug 11 '11 at 13:20
    
@Yoshi i think i didn't explained well, when i include the file that contains the function, it can be called anywhere, like: echoA(); instead of $myClass->echoA(); –  Shadow Walker Aug 11 '11 at 13:21
2  
PHP is not Ruby. Once class is defined, you can't really add methods to it. –  Mchl Aug 11 '11 at 13:24

8 Answers 8

You cannot dynamically add methods to a class at runtime, period.*
PHP simply isn't a very duck-punchable language.

* Without ugly hacks.

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if i read the manual right, the __call get called insted of the function, if the function dosn't exist so you probely need to call it after you created it

Class myClass
{
    function __call($name, $args)
    {
        require_once($name.".php");
        $this->$name($args);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You can't add methods to php classes while execution. –  Yoshi Aug 11 '11 at 13:24
    
i tried this 2hours ago, we cant add method by including a file that contains function(s), that's why i asked this question ;) –  Shadow Walker Aug 11 '11 at 13:33

You can dynamically add attributes and methods providing it is done through the constructor in the same way you can pass a function as argument of another function.

class Example {
function __construct($f) { $this->action=$f; }
}

function fun() {
echo "hello\n";
}

$ex1 = new class('fun');

You can not call directlry $ex1->action(), it must be assigned to a variable and then you can call this variable like a function.

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Please post an essential part here –  VladL Sep 17 '14 at 8:11

What you are referring to is called Overloading. Read all about it in the PHP Manual

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I've worked up the following code example and a helper method which works with __call which may prove useful. https://github.com/permanenttourist/helpers/tree/master/PHP/php_append_methods

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2  
Note that link-only answers are discouraged, SO answers should be the end-point of a search for a solution (vs. yet another stopover of references, which tend to get stale over time). Please consider adding a stand-alone synopsis here, keeping the link as a reference. –  kleopatra Oct 16 '13 at 9:40

You can create an attribute in your class : methods=[]
and use create_function for create lambda function.
Stock it in the methods attribute, at index of the name of method you want.
use :

function __call($method, $arguments)
{
   if(method_exists($this, $method))
      $this->$method($arguments);
   else
      $this->methods[$method]($arguments);
}

to find and call good method.

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Is this what you need?

$methodOne = function ()
{
    echo "I am  doing one.".PHP_EOL;
};

$methodTwo = function ()
{
    echo "I am doing two.".PHP_EOL;
};

class Composite
{
    function addMethod($name, $method)
    {
        $this->{$name} = $method;
    }

    public function __call($name, $arguments)
    {
        return call_user_func($this->{$name}, $arguments);
    }
}


$one = new Composite();
$one -> addMethod("method1", $methodOne);
$one -> method1();
$one -> addMethod("method2", $methodTwo);
$one -> method2();
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