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There's no way to do something like this, in C++ is there?

union {
    {
        Scalar x, y;
    }
    Scalar v[2];
};

Where x == v[0] and y == v[1]?

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1  
Please be aware that while C++ guarantees that elements of an array are laid out contiguously, it only guarantees that the address of an element of a POD struct is greater than the address of all earlier-declared elements. This means it's possible (though unlikely) that v[1] and y don't correspond. –  j_random_hacker Apr 1 '09 at 2:12
    
@ j_random_hacker: Are you sure? I believe there's another rule, inherited from C, from which yoiu can derive that there's no initial padding (something in the aliasing rules IIRC, about accessing a struct via a pointer of the type of the first element) –  MSalters Sep 27 '10 at 8:34
    
Yeah, that rule exists in C++ as well. There's no initial padding, but I think @j_random_hackers point is that there might be padding in the struct after the first element (and before the second one) –  jalf Sep 27 '10 at 8:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

How about

union {
    struct {
        int x;
        int y;
    };
    int v[2];
};

edit:

union a {
    struct b { int first, second; } bee;
    int v[2];
};

Ugly, but that's more accurate

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Of course! A struct! Brilliant! –  Mark Mar 31 '09 at 19:31
1  
Wouldn't you give the struct a name so you can reference union_name.struct_name.x? –  Tom Ritter Mar 31 '09 at 19:31
1  
Depending on what type x, y, and z are, and which specific compiler you're using, and even what the target platform is, you may see issues caused by data alignment. Essentially, x and y may not necessarily reside in memory in direct correspondence with v[0] and v[1]. –  John Watts Mar 31 '09 at 21:01
1  
+1 John Watts. C++ guarantees that elements of an array are laid out contiguously, but only guarantees that the address of an element of a POD struct is greater than the address of all earlier-declared elements (i.e. there is more flexibility in laying out structs). –  j_random_hacker Apr 1 '09 at 2:06
2  
At least, please add a compile-time assertion that offsetof(v[1]) == offsetof(y) (using e.g. BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT). This will be the case on most compilers/platforms, but it never hurts to make sure. –  j_random_hacker Apr 1 '09 at 2:09

Since you are using C++ and not C, and since they are of the same types, why not just make x a reference to v[0] and y a reference to v[1]

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+1. This nicely gets around the fact that v[1] is not guaranteed by C++ language rules to correspond to y. –  j_random_hacker Apr 1 '09 at 2:10
    
Assuming you mean for the code operating on the struct to declare these references as local variables: the compiler will optimise them away, so there's no need to t worry about performance. –  j_random_hacker Apr 1 '09 at 2:11

Try this:

template<class T>
struct U1
{
    U1();
    T   v[2];
    T&  x;
    T&  y;
};

template<class T>
U1<T>::U1()
    :x(v[0])
    ,y(v[1])
{}

int main()
{
    U1<int>   data;

    data.x  = 1;
    data.y  = 2;
}
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1  
g++ gives sizeof(U1<char>) as 12.. rather than 2. (g++ 4.0.1) –  Michael Anderson Sep 27 '10 at 7:56
    
@Michael: Why do you think it should be 2? –  Loki Astari Sep 27 '10 at 8:24
2  
I'm saying that for something that is essentially providing access to two pieces of data, the resulting struct is expanded by a large degree by holding two additional pointers... That may be acceptable in some cases, and unacceptable in others .. Just a warning to those looking at this solution. –  Michael Anderson Sep 27 '10 at 8:52

I've used something like this before. I'm not sure its 100% OK by the standard, but it seems to be OK with any compilers I've needed to use it on.

struct Vec2
{
  float x;
  float y;
  float& operator[](int i) { return *(&x+i); }
};

You can add bounds checking etc to operator[] if you want ( you probably should want) and you can provide a const version of operator[] too.

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Depending on what "Scalar" is, yes, you can do that in C++. The syntax is almost exactly (maybe even exactly exactly, but I'm rusty on unions) what you wrote in your example. It's the same as C, except there are restrictions on the types that can be in the unions (IIRC they must have a default constructor). Here's the relevant Wikipedia article.

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Scalar is just a float or double... changeable if I need more precision. Thanks –  Mark Mar 31 '09 at 19:33

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