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I have an application with one form in it, and on the Load method I need to hide the form.

The form will display itself when it has a need to (think along the lines of a outlook 2003 style popup), but I can' figure out how to hide the form on load without something messy.

Any suggestions?

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17 Answers 17

up vote 63 down vote accepted

I'm coming at this from C#, but should be very similar in vb.net.

In your main program file, in the Main method, you will have something like:

Application.Run(new MainForm());

This creates a new main form and limits the lifetime of the application to the lifetime of the main form.

However, if you remove the parameter to Application.Run(), then the application will be started with no form shown and you will be free to show and hide forms as much as you like.

Rather than hiding the form in the Load method, set the Visible property of the form to False using the designer. You can create the form before calling Application.Run(), I'm assuming the form will have a NotifyIcon on it to display an icon in the task bar - this can be displayed even if the form itself is not yet visible.

Update: You will also want to set the Application.ShutdownMode property to ShutdownMode.OnExplicitShutdown.

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7  
By far and away the best (and one of the simplest) solutions I've seen. All the garbage about setting opacity to zero, having separate Timer instances to hide the form etc have code smell for days. –  nathanchere Mar 12 '10 at 0:26
    
I could have +1ned your answer but that would mess your round-figure reputation. But..what the hell –  Ben Jan 20 '13 at 18:47
    
I want to give you so many reps. –  NMunro Jul 3 '13 at 20:26
    
Using this method, will it still be found by Process.MainWindowHandle and the like? –  Sebastian Godelet Sep 16 '13 at 10:07

Usually you would only be doing this when you are using a tray icon or some other method to display the form later, but it will work nicely even if you never display your main form.

Create a bool in your Form class that is defaulted to false:

private bool allowshowdisplay = false;

Then override the SetVisibleCore method

protected override void SetVisibleCore(bool value)
{            
    base.SetVisibleCore(allowshowdisplay ? value : allowshowdisplay);
}

Because Application.Run() sets the forms .Visible = true after it loads the form this will intercept that and set it to false. In the above case, it will always set it to false until you enable it by setting allowshowdisplay to true.

Now that will keep the form from displaying on startup, now you need to re-enable the SetVisibleCore to function properly by setting the allowshowdisplay = true. You will want to do this on whatever user interface function that displays the form. In my example it is the left click event in my notiyicon object:

private void notifyIcon1_MouseClick(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Button == System.Windows.Forms.MouseButtons.Left)
    {
        this.allowshowdisplay = true;
        this.Visible = !this.Visible;                
    }
}
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Thanks! Unlike nearly all of the other suggestions here, this one does NOT show a brief flash of the main window. –  Andy Jan 6 '11 at 10:38
    
This is the actual correct way to do this, so it should be the accepted answer. Back in the MFC days we used to do a similar thing where we would handle the first WM_WINDOWPOSCHANGING message and hide the form there to prevent "window flashing". –  enriquein Sep 28 '11 at 2:15
    
Thanks I tried the accepted answer and it didn't work as I need to show a tray Icon, this however worked perfectly. –  Omar Kooheji Apr 17 '12 at 15:48
    
Thanx. Perfect solution. Also applicable to non-startup forms. –  Arvin Jul 9 '12 at 8:29
    
This works, but I think @Jeff's answer is better since it doesn't require an override with some logic hacking. –  Mark Lakata Jul 18 '13 at 18:10

I use this:

private void MainForm_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (Settings.Instance.HideAtStartup)
    {
        BeginInvoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate
        {
            Hide();
        }));
    }
}

Obviously you have to change the if condition with yours.

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Cool :) Nice one thanks. –  Anuraj Jul 26 '12 at 1:52

At form construction time (Designer, program Main, or Form constructor, depending on your goals),

 this.WindowState = FormWindowState.Minimized;
 this.ShowInTaskbar = false;

When you need to show the form, presumably on event from your NotifyIcon, reverse as necessary,

 if (!this.ShowInTaskbar)
    this.ShowInTaskbar = true;

 if (this.WindowState == FormWindowState.Minimized)
    this.WindowState = FormWindowState.Normal;

Successive show/hide events can more simply use the Form's Visible property or Show/Hide methods.

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This works in the Load event as well. I think this is the Way It Was Intended. –  Mark Lakata Jul 18 '13 at 18:11

Extend your main form with this one:

using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace HideWindows
{
    public class HideForm : Form
    {
        public HideForm()
        {
            Opacity = 0;
            ShowInTaskbar = false;
        }

        public new void Show()
        {
            Opacity = 100;
            ShowInTaskbar = true;

            Show(this);
        }
    }
}

For example:

namespace HideWindows
{
    public partial class Form1 : HideForm
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }
    }
}

More info in this article (spanish):

http://codelogik.net/2008/12/30/primer-form-oculto/

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website is out of order. –  Cocoa Dev Feb 9 '12 at 18:37
    protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
    {
        Visible = false; // Hide form window.
        ShowInTaskbar = false; // Remove from taskbar.
        Opacity = 0;

        base.OnLoad(e);
    }
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I have struggled with this issue a lot and the solution is much simpler than i though. I first tried all the suggestions here but then i was not satisfied with the result and investigated it a little more. I found that if I add the:

 this.visible=false;
 /* to the InitializeComponent() code just before the */
 this.Load += new System.EventHandler(this.DebugOnOff_Load);

It is working just fine. but I wanted a more simple solution and it turn out that if you add the:

this.visible=false;
/* to the start of the load event, you get a
simple perfect working solution :) */ 
private void
DebugOnOff_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
this.Visible = false;
}
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Here is a simple approach:
It's in C# (I don't have VB compiler at the moment)

public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    Hide(); // Also Visible = false can be used
}

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Thread.Sleep(10000);
    Show(); // Or visible = true;
}
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if you dont add the Show Line in Form1_Load, the form is shown anyway, even if you set visible to false... -1 –  Eugenio Miró Nov 5 '09 at 20:29
    
-1 This does not work. Application.Run() conspires against your to show the form no matter what. –  Mark Lakata Jul 18 '13 at 18:32

In the designer, set the form's Visible property to false. Then avoid calling Show() until you need it.

A better paradigm is to not create an instance of the form until you need it.

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Launching an app without a form means you're going to have to manage the application startup/shutdown yourself.

Starting the form off invisible is a better option.

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This example supports total invisibility as well as only NotifyIcon in the System tray and no clicks and much more.

More here: http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/TheNotifyIconExample

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As a complement to Groky's response (which is actually the best response by far in my perspective) we could also mention the ApplicationContext class, which allows also (as it's shown in the article's sample) the ability to open two (or even more) Forms on application startup, and control the application lifetime with all of them.

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static void Main()
{
    Application.EnableVisualStyles();
    Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
    MainUIForm mainUiForm = new MainUIForm();
    mainUiForm.Visible = false;
    Application.Run();
}
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Still shows the main window briefly before closing it. –  Andy Jan 6 '11 at 10:35

I do it like this - from my point of view the easiest way:

set the form's 'StartPosition' to 'Manual', and add this to the form's designer:

Private Sub InitializeComponent()
.
.
.
Me.Location=New Point(-2000,-2000)
.
.
.
End Sub

Make sure that the location is set to something beyond or below the screen's dimensions. Later, when you want to show the form, set the Location to something within the screen's dimensions.

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In the second answer above (I dont have enough reputation to add a comment), it works perfectly, but if someone needs to read the image of the notify icon from resource file, then you have add that line as follows

protected override void SetVisibleCore(bool value)
{            
 base.SetVisibleCore(allowshowdisplay ? value : allowshowdisplay);
 notifyIcon1.Icon = (System.Drawing.Icon)(Properties.Resources.Printer);
}

trying to do that at form load wont work ....

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Why do it like that at all?

Why not just start like a console app and show the form when necessary? There's nothing but a few references separating a console app from a forms app.

No need in being greedy and taking the memory needed for the form when you may not even need it.

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Based on various suggestions, all I had to do was this:

To hide the form:

Me.Opacity = 0
Me.ShowInTaskbar = false

To show the form:

Me.Opacity = 100
Me.ShowInTaskbar = true
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What if the user accidently hits an Enter key or types in the transparent area ? I think you should also do Me.Enable = false; –  Angshuman Agarwal Mar 23 '12 at 16:05

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