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I have another question related to the safe bool idiom:

typedef void (Testable::*bool_type)() const;             // const necessary?
void this_type_does_not_support_comparisons() const {}   // const necessary?

operator bool_type() const
{
    return ok_ ? &Testable::this_type_does_not_support_comparisons : 0;
}

How come the bool_type (the typedef) and this_type_does_not_support_comparisons are const? Nobody is supposed to actually call the member function through the return pointer anyway, right? Is const necessary here? Would operator bool_type (the member function) violate const-correctness otherwise?

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My bet is that const is not necessary. A body for the function is not either, since you're not supposed to call the function anyway. –  Alexandre C. Aug 11 '11 at 15:03
    
@Alex: But a member function without a body has no address, right? It doesn't compile without a body on VC10, at least. –  FredOverflow Aug 11 '11 at 15:15
    
hmm you're right. I just checked my safe_bool template I have deep in my VS2010 current project and it has a body. It has const too. –  Alexandre C. Aug 11 '11 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The "safe bool idiom" is the technical answer to the question "i want a vehicle that is both sports car and tractor, and maybe a boat". The practical answer is not the technical answer…

That said, the problem it solves is just to give a result that is convertible to bool but not to much of anything else (otherwise an instance of the class could be passed as actual argument where e.g. the formal argument was int, say). A data pointer could be convertible to void*. A function pointer isn't, at least formally within the C++ standard (Posix is something else, practice also).

Using a member function pointer protects against accidentally calling the function, given the pointer from the safe bool operator. The const constricts it a bit, but if fate has put someone on the path of making maximum number of silly mistakes, that person might still manage to call the do-nothing function. Instead of the const I think I would just let it have an argument of a private type, where other code cannot provide such an argument, and then it doesn't have to be a silly member function type anymore.

Can look like this:

#include <stdio.h>

class Foo
{
private:
    enum PrivateArg {};
    typedef void (*SafeBool)( PrivateArg );
    static void safeTrue( PrivateArg ) {}

    bool    state_;

public:
    Foo( bool state ): state_( state ) {}

    operator SafeBool () const
    { return (state_? &safeTrue : 0); }
};

int main()
{
    if( Foo( true ) ) { printf( "true\n" ); }
    if( Foo( false ) ) { printf( "false\n" ); } // No output.

    //int const x1 = Foo( false );        // No compilado!
    //void* const x2 = Foo( false );      // No compilado!
}

Of course, the practical answer is instead something like this:

#include <stdio.h>

class Foo
{
private:
    bool    isEmpty_;

public:
    Foo( bool asInitiallyEmpty )
        : isEmpty_( asInitiallyEmpty )
    {}

    bool isEmpty() const { return isEmpty_; }
};

int main()
{
    if( Foo( true ).isEmpty() ) { printf( "true\n" ); }
    if( Foo( false ).isEmpty() ) { printf( "false\n" ); } // No output.

    //bool const x0 = Foo( false );       // No compilado!
    //int const x1 = Foo( false );        // No compilado!
    //void* const x2 = Foo( false );      // No compilado!
}

Summary wrt. questions asked:

  • How come the bool_type (the typedef) and this_type_does_not_support_comparisons are const?

Somebody didn't quite understand what they coded. Or maybe they intended to restrict the ability to call, a little. But then, pretty futile measure.

  • Nobody is supposed to actually call the member function through the return pointer anyway, right?

Right.

  • Is const necessary here?

No.

  • Would operator bool_type (the member function) violate const-correctness otherwise?

No.

Cheers & hth.,

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"I think I would just let it have an argument of a private type", oh wait, I retract my previous statement, this is brilliant! –  FredOverflow Aug 11 '11 at 15:46
    
I wrote something wrong about the const, somehow confusing black and white. I just strike it out. Sorry -- the rest is OK though. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 11 '11 at 15:52
    
You can still (stupidly, but this is the point of the exercise) declare a free function with signature void (Foo::PrivateArg) and compare it to the result of operator SafeBool. I think the SafeBool type must be a pointer to member function after all. –  Alexandre C. Aug 11 '11 at 16:00
    
@Alexandre C: Regarding your comment "You can still (stupidly, but this is the point of the exercise) declare a free function with signature void (Foo::PrivateArg) and assign its address or compare it to the result of operator SafeBool". Anyone who does use a private type in that way, deserves whatever is coming. As I see it it is out of the realm of practical programming. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 11 '11 at 16:04
    
@Alexandre: I don't know, but an easy way to check is to put the code to Comeau Online compiler. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 11 '11 at 16:09

8.3.5/ A cv-qualifier-seq shall only be part of the function type for a nonstatic member function, the function type to which a pointer to member refers, or the top-level function type of a function typedef declaration. The effect of a cv-qualifier-seq in a function declarator is not the same as adding cv-qualification on top of the function type, i.e., it does not create a cv-qualified function type.

If I read correctly, you can return a pointer to non const member in a const member function. You just won't be able to call it with a non const object.

A way to forbid the calling is:

private:
    struct private_ 
    {
        void this_type_does_not_support_comparisons() {}
    };

public:
    typedef void (private_::*bool_type)() const;

    operator bool_type() const
    {
        return ok_ ? &private_::this_type_does_not_support_comparisons : 0;
    }

Pointer to member functions can still be compared for equality. You have to write an operator== and operator!= for Testable::bool_type types which trigger an error. Easier to do with the CRTP form of the safe bool idiom since those operators become templates and thus can have an erroneous body.

Example:

template <typename T>
class safe_bool_concept
{
    // Implementation detail of safe bool
protected:
    ~safe_bool_concept() {}

public:
    operator safe_bool() const
    {
        return static_cast<const T*>(this)->is_null() ? ...;
    }
};

struct Foo : safe_bool_concept<Foo>
{
    ...

private:
    friend class safe_bool_concept<Foo>;
    bool is_null() const { ... }
};

then you can do (do the same with !=):

template <typename T>
void operator==(const safe_bool_concept<T>& x, const safe_bool_concept<T>&)
{
    x.some_private_member(); // invalid, but won't be generated
                             // unless safe_bool classes are compared
}

This means that the safe bool idiom should be implemented via CRTP if you want to forbid comparisons. Comparisons to zero will still work however.

If you go the non-member function route, you'll have to provide <, >, <= and >= too.

share|improve this answer
    
@Alf: let me write some code, so that my intent is clearer. –  Alexandre C. Aug 11 '11 at 17:43

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