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I have two very similar but not identical C# objects. I am copying the values from one class to another.

Each class has some properties that expose an enumeration type. The inside of the enumerations are the same but the names are different e.g.

public enum EnumA
{
 A,
 B
} 

public EnumA EnumAProperty
{
 get{ return enumA;}
}

public enum EnumB
{
 A,
 B
} 

public EnumB EnumBProperty
{
 get{ return enumB;}
}

I want to assign the value returned from EnumBProperty to EnumAProperty is this possible?

share|improve this question
    
And yes I know I need a set! – AJM Aug 11 '11 at 15:09
    
hmmm not sure if enum types are compatible in that way... – Tony The Lion Aug 11 '11 at 15:11
    
unless you assigned values to the enum members and got the value of EnumA and assigned that value to EnumB. Would that work? – Tony The Lion Aug 11 '11 at 15:12
1  
eNumb – something so bad that it numbs its users to the pain of using it. :-) – SLaks Aug 11 '11 at 15:15
    
On a design note (and obviously not knowing your objects) - do the separate enums need to be defined in the object classes, or could you have a common enum in a separate static class, and have your objects use that? That eliminates the parsing/maintenance/setting-a-non-defined-enum-value issues, if it is possible to do. – Wonko the Sane Aug 11 '11 at 15:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can do via casting but I would not recommend it as it is fragile — if any of the enum members are reordered or new items added the result may not be what you expect.

EnumAProperty = (EnumA) EnumBProperty;

Even worse with the casting is if you have items in your source enum with no equivalent in the destination — below there are more colours than shapes:

enum Color { Red = 0, Yellow = 1, Blue = 2 };
enum Shape ( Square = 0, Triangle = 1 };

Color color = Color.Red;
Shape shape = (Shape) color;

shape could end up with the value 2 even though this value is not defined.

Instead, I'd suggest you use a switch statement to map:

EnumAProperty = ConvertToA(EnumBProperty);

...

private static EnumA ConvertToA(EnumBProperty b)
{
    switch (b)
    {
        case EnumB.Flannel: return EnumA.HandTowel;
        case EnemB.Vest: return EnumA.UnderShirt;
        ...
        default: throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("b");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the ver important, but often overlooked, point that you can assign a value that isn't defined in the enum. – Wonko the Sane Aug 11 '11 at 15:21

Each enum member has a corresponding integer value.
By default, these values are assigned in ascending order, starting with 0.

If the order of the items in the enums (and thus their numeric values) are the same, you can just cast the numeric value to EnumB to get the EnumB member with the same value:

 EnumBProperty = (EnumB)(int)EnumAProperty;

If not, you need to re-parse it:

EnumBProperty = (EnumB)Enum.Parse(typeof(EnumB), EnumAProperty.ToString());
share|improve this answer

As long as both enum's of different types you can'not assign it directly. You can define integer offset for an items so you can assign values through the integer value

public enum EnumA 
{  
 A = 0,  
 B = 1
}   

public enum EnumB
{  
 A = 0,  
 B = 1
}   

EnumBPropertry = (int)EnumAProperty
share|improve this answer
    
That's ok, until somebody changes the definition of the enum in one but not the other. – Wonko the Sane Aug 11 '11 at 15:22

You could either cast it to an integer or convert it to a string and then do an Enum.Parse on it.

share|improve this answer

Try the following:

EnumAProperty = (EnumA)Enum.Parse(typeof(EnumA), EnumBProperty.ToString);
share|improve this answer
EnumBProperty = (EnumB)Enum.Parse(typeof(EnumB), EnumAProperty.ToString());
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