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I'm trying to do this:

interface IA
{
}

class A : IA
{
}

class Foo<T> where T: IA
{
}

class Program
{
    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
        Foo<A> fooA = new Foo<A>();
        Foo<IA> fooIA = fooA as Foo<IA>;
    }
}

However, the cast from Foo<A> to Foo<IA> does not compile. I recall seeing covariance issues like this when casting between List<T>'s, but I didn't think it applied to simple generics like this.

What is a good work around to getting this cast to work? How do I solve this problem?

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1  
Some related reading: stackoverflow.com/questions/245607/… –  drharris Aug 11 '11 at 15:14
3  
A Foo<IA> simply isn't a Foo<A>, and can't be made to be so. You haven't said what you're trying to achieve, which makes it very hard to help you towards a solution. –  Jon Skeet Aug 11 '11 at 15:16
    
@Jon: The real example is substantially more complex, but this simple code I have provided is the bare bones of the problem. It all comes down to using generics to represent a base type, and those classes perform operations on those base types and NEVER need to downcast them, so the typical danger in this is moot since I will not be downcasting IA to an A (or a B, or C, or whatever it is). –  void.pointer Aug 11 '11 at 15:26
    
@Robert: But without seeing the code within Foo, we can't tell anything about the safety involved, or the best way of working around it. –  Jon Skeet Aug 11 '11 at 16:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

All generic classes are invariant. Interfaces (and delegates) on the other hand can support co- and contra-variance, but only in the cases where it's possible safely. And they need to opt-in explicitly.

For example via IFoo<out T> or IFoo<int T>

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those classes perform operations on those base types and NEVER need to downcast them

Then why do you need a Foo<A> to begin with? Declare it as Foo<IA> and add A's to it.

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interface IA
    {
    }

    class A : IA
    {
    }

    interface IFoo<T> where T : IA
    {
    }

    class Foo<T> : IFoo<T> where T : IA
    {
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            IFoo<A> fooA = new Foo<A>();
            Foo<IA> fooIa = fooA as Foo<IA>;
        }
    }
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Sorry this is in java but you could do something like this:

interface Alpha
{
}

class Beta implements Alpha
{
}  

class Foo<T>
{
}

class Program
{
    static void main(string[] args)
    {
        Foo<Beta> fooBeta = new Foo<Beta>();
        Foo<? implements Alpha> fooAlpha = fooBeta;
    }
}

This doesn't solve the issue completely but you get you can at least get access to all of the Alpha methods without knowing about Beta...

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