Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Take this simple example for example:

<asp:Panel ID="pnlTest" runat="server">
    <asp:TextBox ID="txPanelText" Text="Text" runat="server" />
</asp:Panel>

Now, in the codebehind, do this:

pnlTest.Enabled = false;
txPanelText.Enabled = true;

Why does disabling the panel also disable the textbox within it? Furthermore, why does explicitly enabling the textbox have no effect?

This obviously has something to do with the ASP.NET framework. Is there any way I can avoid this?

NOTE: This is not the actual code I am using in my application. It's just an example to show how disabling a control also recursively disables all child controls within it.

share|improve this question
    
Obviously if you disable the panel, everything in it will be disabled - this is by design. –  IrishChieftain Aug 11 '11 at 15:43
    
your title says how to disable controls withing panel but in the question it says you need to enable controls withing a disabled panel –  Jayantha Aug 11 '11 at 15:45
    
IrishChieftain - Right, I knew it had to be framework-related, hence my question of "Is there any way I can avoid this?". Jayantha - Right. The controls are automatically being disabled, so my code example above illustrates how I am trying to forcibly enable them after the fact. –  oscilatingcretin Aug 11 '11 at 15:55
    
I think it would help if you described the UI and what it does. Then we might be able to come up with an alternative for you. Typically I try to avoid getting into these situations when designing my UI :) –  IrishChieftain Aug 11 '11 at 16:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That is by design, and to achieve the effect that you're looking for you'll need to use a different approach. I would suggest recursively iterating through the child controls and using some logic to determine which controls get disabled and which don't.

share|improve this answer

you can do this in client side using javascript.

var controls = document.getElementById("<%=pnlTest.ClientID%>").getElementsByTagName("input");

for (var i = 0; i < controls.length; i++)
    controls[i].disabled = true; 
share|improve this answer
    
Remember, the example I had given is only a simple example. The control hierarchy in our actual app contains many controls of different types. Additionally, some controls have to remain disabled, so we can't do an unconditional, brute force enabling of every child control. The only way I can see getting this to work is by recursively getting a collection of all enabled child controls and then re-enabling them on the client after the fact, but I am looking to not have to resort to such a hack that's only theoretical at this point. –  oscilatingcretin Aug 11 '11 at 15:48

This is because the controls have an additional internal property called IsEnabled that is returned as False if the control or any of the controls in the parent tree have Enabled set to False. During rendering, the TextBox adds the disabled attribute if this IsEnabled property is False.

You could create your own custom controls by inheriting from the Panel and TextBox controls and add in your own properties and logic. Something like what I have below should work.

Also, I wouldn't recommend rendering the disabled attribute on the Panel, which renders as a div. The disabled attribute is not a standard html attribute for a div, and the browsers render the contents inconsistently. For example, IE 9 dims an inner text box (if the text box does not have its own disabled attribute) BUT you can still modify the text box value. Firefox ignores the tag and renders the text box as normal.

public class TextBox : System.Web.UI.WebControls.TextBox, IDisabled
{

    public System.Nullable<bool> Disabled
    {
        get { return (System.Nullable<bool>)ViewState["Disabled"]; }
        set { ViewState["Disabled"] = value; }
    }

    public override bool Enabled
    {
        get
        {
            if (this.Disabled.HasValue)
            {
                return !this.Disabled.Value;
            }
            else
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
        set { this.Disabled = !value; }
    }

    protected override void AddAttributesToRender(System.Web.UI.HtmlTextWriter writer)
    {
        base.AddAttributesToRender(writer);

        if (Utilities.RenderDisabled(this))
        {
            writer.AddAttribute(System.Web.UI.HtmlTextWriterAttribute.Disabled, "disabled");
        }
    }

}

public class Panel : System.Web.UI.WebControls.Panel, IDisabled
{

    public System.Nullable<bool> Disabled
    {
        get { return (System.Nullable<bool>)ViewState["Disabled"]; }
        set { ViewState["Disabled"] = value; }
    }

    public override bool Enabled
    {
        get { return true; }
        set { this.Disabled = !value; }
    }

}

public interface IDisabled
{
    System.Nullable<bool> Disabled { get; set; }
    bool Enabled { get; set; }
}

public sealed class Utilities
{
    public static bool RenderDisabled(IDisabled control)
    {
        return (control.Disabled.HasValue && control.Disabled.Value) || (!control.Disabled.HasValue && IsParentDisabled(control));
    }

    public static bool IsParentDisabled(IDisabled control)
    {
        System.Web.UI.Control current = ((System.Web.UI.Control)control).Parent;
        IDisabled currentDisabled = default(IDisabled);
        while (current != null)
        {
            currentDisabled = current as IDisabled;
            if (currentDisabled != null && currentDisabled.Disabled.HasValue)
            {
                return currentDisabled.Disabled.Value;
            }
            current = current.Parent;
        }

        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.