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Is there a simple function for rounding UP a DateTime to the nearest 15 minutes?

E.g.

2011-08-11 16:59 becomes 2011-08-11 17:00

2011-08-11 17:00 stays as 2011-08-11 17:00

2011-08-11 17:01 becomes 2011-08-11 17:15

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7 Answers 7

up vote 86 down vote accepted
DateTime RoundUp(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    return new DateTime(((dt.Ticks + d.Ticks - 1) / d.Ticks) * d.Ticks);
}

Example:

var dt1 = RoundUp(DateTime.Parse("2011-08-11 16:59"), TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15));
// dt1 == {11/08/2011 17:00:00}

var dt2 = RoundUp(DateTime.Parse("2011-08-11 17:00"), TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15));
// dt2 == {11/08/2011 17:00:00}

var dt3 = RoundUp(DateTime.Parse("2011-08-11 17:01"), TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15));
// dt3 == {11/08/2011 17:15:00}
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2  
This solution just made it into my utility library as an extension method. –  JYelton Aug 11 '11 at 16:42
    
I'm bad at math. What would the RoundDown() equivalent look like? ...Found that... I'll leave an answer. –  Theo Jun 14 '13 at 20:21
    
@Theo: stackoverflow.com/a/10100259 –  dtb Jun 14 '13 at 20:23
2  
Why does this work? I'm having a hard time visualizing this. –  user1454265 May 16 at 19:51
1  
@user14.. The ( + d.Ticks - 1) makes sure it will round up if necessary. The / and * are rounding. Example round 12 to the next 5: (12 + 5 - 1) = 16, 16 / 5 = 3 (because it is an integer datatype), 3 * 5 = 15. tada :) –  Diego Frehner Aug 9 at 10:13

if you need to round to a nearest time interval (not up) then i suggest to use the following

    static DateTime RoundToNearestInterval(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
    {
        int f=0;
        double m = (double)(dt.Ticks % d.Ticks) / d.Ticks;
        if (m >= 0.5)
            f=1;            
        return new DateTime(((dt.Ticks/ d.Ticks)+f) * d.Ticks);
    }
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Came up with a solution that doesn't involve multiplying and dividing long numbers.

public static DateTime RoundUp(this DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    var delta = (d.Ticks - (dt.Ticks % d.Ticks)) % d.Ticks;
    return new DateTime(dt.Ticks + delta);
}

public static DateTime RoundDown(this DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    var delta = dt.Ticks % d.Ticks;
    return new DateTime(dt.Ticks - delta);
}

public static DateTime RoundToNearest(this DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    var delta = dt.Ticks % d.Ticks;
    bool roundUp = delta > d.Ticks / 2;

    return roundUp ? dt.RoundUp(d) : dt.RoundDown(d);
}

Usage:

var date = new DateTime(2010, 02, 05, 10, 35, 25, 450); // 2010/02/05 10:35:25
var roundedUp = date.RoundUp(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15)); // 2010/02/05 10:45:00
var roundedDown = date.RoundDown(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15)); // 2010/02/05 10:30:00
var roundedToNearest = date.RoundToNearest(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15)); // 2010/02/05 10:30:00
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4  
I thought for sure that this would be faster than using multiplication and division, but my testing shows that it isn't. This over 10000000 iterations, the modulus method took ~610ms on my machine, while the mult/div method took ~500ms. I guess FPUs make the concerns of old a non-issue. Here is my test code: pastie.org/8610460 –  viggity Jan 7 at 16:45
void Main()
{
    var date1 = new DateTime(2011, 8, 11, 16, 59, 00);
    date1.Round15().Dump();

    var date2 = new DateTime(2011, 8, 11, 17, 00, 02);
    date2.Round15().Dump();

    var date3 = new DateTime(2011, 8, 11, 17, 01, 23);
    date3.Round15().Dump();

    var date4 = new DateTime(2011, 8, 11, 17, 00, 00);
    date4.Round15().Dump();
}

public static class Extentions
{
    public static DateTime Round15(this DateTime value)
    {   
        var ticksIn15Mins = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(15).Ticks;

        return (value.Ticks % ticksIn15Mins == 0) ? value : new DateTime((value.Ticks / ticksIn15Mins + 1) * ticksIn15Mins);
    }
}

Results:

8/11/2011 5:00:00 PM
8/11/2011 5:15:00 PM
8/11/2011 5:15:00 PM
8/11/2011 5:00:00 PM
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3  
2011-08-11 17:00:01 gets truncated to 2011-08-11 17:00:00 –  JYelton Aug 11 '11 at 16:49
1  
@JYelton: Thanks for pointing out +1. I changed my code to accommodate that. –  Vlad Bezden Aug 11 '11 at 17:03

Since I hate reinventing the wheel, I'd probably follow this algorithm to round a DateTime value to a specified increment of time (Timespan):

  • Convert the DateTime value to be rounded to a decimal floating-point value representing the whole and fractional number of TimeSpan units.
  • Round that to an integer, using Math.Round().
  • Scale back to ticks by multiplying the rounded integer by the number of ticks in the TimeSpan unit.
  • Instantiate a new DateTime value from the rounded number of ticks and return it to the caller.

Here's the code:

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{

    public static DateTime Round( this DateTime value , TimeSpan unit )
    {
        return Round( value , unit , default(MidpointRounding) ) ;
    }

    public static DateTime Round( this DateTime value , TimeSpan unit , MidpointRounding style )
    {
        if ( unit <= TimeSpan.Zero ) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("unit" , "value must be positive") ;

        Decimal  units        = (decimal) value.Ticks / (decimal) unit.Ticks ;
        Decimal  roundedUnits = Math.Round( units , style ) ;
        long     roundedTicks = (long) roundedUnits * unit.Ticks ;
        DateTime instance     = new DateTime( roundedTicks ) ;

        return instance ;
    }

}
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This is nice code for rounding to the nearest DateTime, but I also want the ability to round up to a multiple of unit . Passing in MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero to Round does not have the desired effect. Do you have something else in mind by accepting a MidpointRounding argument? –  HappyNomad Nov 26 '13 at 8:19

Elegant?

dt.AddSeconds(900 - (x.Minute * 60 + x.Second) % 900)
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A more correct version would be: x.AddSeconds(900 - (x.AddSeconds(-1).Minute * 60 + x.AddSeconds(-1).Second) % 900).AddSeconds(-1), that takes care of the "stays" condition. –  Olaf Aug 11 '11 at 16:35

Caution: the formula above is incorrect, i.e. the following:

DateTime RoundUp(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    return new DateTime(((dt.Ticks + d.Ticks - 1) / d.Ticks) * d.Ticks);
}

should be rewritten as:

DateTime RoundUp(DateTime dt, TimeSpan d)
{
    return new DateTime(((dt.Ticks + d.Ticks/2) / d.Ticks) * d.Ticks);
}
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1  
I disagree. Since the integer division / d.Ticks rounds down to the nearest 15-min interval (let's calls these "blocks"), adding only a half block doesn't guarantee rounding up. Consider when you have 4.25 blocks. If you add 0.5 blocks, then test how many integer blocks you have, you still only have 4. Adding one tick less than a full block is the correct action. It ensures you always move up to the next block range (before rounding down), but prevents you from moving between exact blocks. (IE, if you added a full block to 4.0 blocks, 5.0 would round to 5, when you want 4. 4.99 will be 4.) –  Brendan Jan 15 at 8:37

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